hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) 942 140 Browse Search
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) 529 203 Browse Search
Virginia (Virginia, United States) 512 0 Browse Search
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) 457 125 Browse Search
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) 436 332 Browse Search
September 422 422 Browse Search
August 395 395 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 368 12 Browse Search
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) 335 89 Browse Search
John Gibbon 328 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. Search the whole document.

Found 218 total hits in 90 results.

... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
George Sykes (search for this): chapter 9
emselves at the battle of Cloyd's Mountain. The eleven remaining regiments were formed into two brigades, constituting Crawford's (3d) Division, Fifth Corps. Sykes's Division. Another division remarkable for superiority in discipline and efficiency, was Sykes's Division of Regulars. The regular troops of the United StatesSykes's Division of Regulars. The regular troops of the United States Army-serving in the Army of the Potomac were formed into one division of two brigades, under command of Major-General George Sykes, who was succeeded in 1863 by General Romeyn B. Ayres. This division included the Second, Third, Fourth, Sixth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Fourteenth, and Seventeenth United States Infantry. The regimMajor-General George Sykes, who was succeeded in 1863 by General Romeyn B. Ayres. This division included the Second, Third, Fourth, Sixth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Fourteenth, and Seventeenth United States Infantry. The regiments were small, seldom having over eight companies to a regiment, and often only three. At Gaines's Mill, and at Gettysburg, they sustained a terrible percentage of loss. The division became so reduced in numbers that it was withdrawn from the field in 1864. The largest losses in the division occurred in the Fourteenth Infantr
William W. Belknap (search for this): chapter 9
) 876 the Philadelphia Brigade. Gibbon's (2D) Division, Second Corps. This brigade was commanded at Gettysburg by General Alex. S. Webb, and was the one which so successfully withstood the brunt of the attack made by Pickett's Divisioni:--   Killed and Died of Wounds. 69th Pennsylvania Infantry 178 71st Pennsylvania Infantry 161 72d Pennsylvania Infantry 193 106th Pennsylvania Infantry 104   Total (during the war) 636 The gallant little Iowa Brigade (Belknap's) of the Seventeenth Corps:--   Killed and Died of Wounds. 11th Iowa Infantry 93 13th Iowa Infantry 119 15th Iowa Infantry 126 16th Iowa Infantry 105   Total (during the war) 443 Custer's famous Cavalry Brigade, which sustained the highest percentage of loss of any brigade in the mounted service:--   Killed and Died of Wounds. 1st Michigan Cavalry 164 5th Michigan Cavalry 141 6th Michigan Cavalry 135 7th Michigan Cavalry 85   Total (durin<
John Gibbon (search for this): chapter 9
mbered only 2,800. Close to it, however, in point of loss stands Gibbon's (2d) Division Formerly Sedgwick's. of the Second Corps, and Grn lost 480 killed, 2,318 wounded, and 196 missing; total, 2,994. Gibbon's Division, at Gettysburg, lost 344 killed, 1,197 wounded, and 101 s exceeded in only one instance. At Manassas, under command of General Gibbon, the first four regiments named lost 148 killed, 626 wounded, a while the Sharpshooters' Battalion was assigned elsewhere. General John Gibbon commanded the Iron Brigade at Manassas, South Mountain, and it should be stated that it was the original Iron Brigade, and that Gibbon's Brigade was not known by that title until after Antietam, at whic  Total (during the war) 876 the Philadelphia Brigade. Gibbon's (2D) Division, Second Corps. This brigade was commanded at Get during the war, occurred at Gettysburg, in Harrow's (1st) Brigade, Gibbon's (2d) Division, Second Corps. Its loss, as officially reported, w
ted the Potomac in 1861, marched together at the Grand Review in 1865. It was commanded successively by General Wm. F. Smith, formerly of the Third Vermont; General W. T. Brooks; Col. Henry Whiting, Second Vermont; and General Lewis A. Grant, formerly of the Fifth Vermont. At one time the Twenty-sixth New Jersey, a nine months regiment, was attached to the brigade for a few months, but it was a temporary arrangement only. The old Brigade should not be confounded with the Vermont Brigade (Stannard's) which was so prominently engaged at Gettysburg. This latter organization was in the First Corps, and was composed of nine months troops, Gettysburg being its only battle. Iron Brigade. Equally good fighting was done by the famous Iron Brigade of the West, First Division, First Corps. Its record is, also, a heroic one.   Killed and Died of Wounds. 2d Wisconsin Infantry 238 6th Wisconsin Infantry 244 7th Wisconsin Infantry 281 19th Indiana Infantry 179 24th Mic
Irwin McDowell (search for this): chapter 9
rigades of infantry. The Reserves were prominently engaged at Dranesville, Mechanicsville, Gaines's Mill, Charles City Cross Roads (Glendale), Manassas, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, and in the Wilderness campaign. At Fredericksburg the division made a gallant fight, the losses being unusually severe in proportion to the number engaged. The division was commanded in turn by Generals McCall, Reynolds, Meade, and Crawford. It was attached, originally, to the First (McDowell's) Corps, but while on the Peninsula it served in the Fifth Corps. At Manassas, Antietam, and Fredericksburg, it was again in the First Corps. After Fredericksburg it was ordered to Washington to rest and recruit its shattered regiments, but it rejoined the Army on the Gettysburg campaign, when it was assigned to the Fifth Corps, in which it remained until mustered out. The casualties in this division do not amount to the heroic aggregate shown by some other divisions, but the percenta
Josiah Pickett (search for this): chapter 9
D) Division, Third Corps.   Killed and Died of Wounds. 70th New York Infantry 190 71st New York Infantry 88 72d New York Infantry 161 73d New York Infantry 156 74th New York Infantry 130 120th New York Infantry 151   Total (during the war) 876 the Philadelphia Brigade. Gibbon's (2D) Division, Second Corps. This brigade was commanded at Gettysburg by General Alex. S. Webb, and was the one which so successfully withstood the brunt of the attack made by Pickett's Divisioni:--   Killed and Died of Wounds. 69th Pennsylvania Infantry 178 71st Pennsylvania Infantry 161 72d Pennsylvania Infantry 193 106th Pennsylvania Infantry 104   Total (during the war) 636 The gallant little Iowa Brigade (Belknap's) of the Seventeenth Corps:--   Killed and Died of Wounds. 11th Iowa Infantry 93 13th Iowa Infantry 119 15th Iowa Infantry 126 16th Iowa Infantry 105   Total (during the war) 443 Custer's famous Cav<
Francis C. Barlow (search for this): chapter 9
— in which more men were killed and wounded than in any other division in the Union Army, east or west. Its losses aggregated 2,287 killed, 11,724 wounded, Including the mortally wounded. and 4,833 missing; total, 18,844. This division was the one which Richardson — its first commander — led on the Peninsula, and at whose head he fell at Antietam; the one which, made the bloody assault on Marye's Heights; which, under Caldwell, fought so well in the Gettysburg wheat-field; which, under Barlow, surged over the enemy's works at Spotsylvania; and which, under Miles, was in at the death in 1865. Within its ranks were the Irish Brigade, and crack regiments like the Fifth New Hampshire, the One Hundred and Fortieth Pennsylvania, and the Sixty-fourth New York. Over 14,000 men were killed or wounded in this division during the war; yet it never numbered 8,000 muskets, and often could muster only half of that. After the charge on Marye's Heights it numbered only 2,800. Close to it, <
Thomas A. Smyth (search for this): chapter 9
of the Seventh New York Heavy Artillery was added; but it was detached in February, 1865, and the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery took its place. In July, 1864, the One Hundred arid Sixteenth Pennsylvania was transferred to the Fourth Brigade. But the Irish Brigade was composed, substantially, as above; and, each of the regiments having reenlisted, its service was continuous and unbroken. It was commanded, in turn, by General Thomas Francis Meagher, Colonel Patrick Kelly (killed), General Thos. A. Smyth Killed while in command of another brigade. (killed), Colonel Richard Byrnes (killed), and General Robert Nugent. Mention should also be made of the following named brigades, and their losses:-- First Jersey Brigade. First Division, Sixth Corps.   Killed and Died of Wounds. 1st New Jersey Infantry 153 2d New Jersey Infantry 96 3d New Jersey Infantry 157 4th New Jersey Infantry 161 10th New Jersey Infantry 93 15th New Jersey Infantry 240   To
Lysander Cutler (search for this): chapter 9
irst Brigade, Third Division (Crawford's), Fifth Corps, while the Sharpshooters' Battalion was assigned elsewhere. General John Gibbon commanded the Iron Brigade at Manassas, South Mountain, and Antietam; General Meredith, at Gettysburg; and General Cutler at the Wilderness. Cutler was succeeded in 1864, by General Edward S. Bragg,--formerly Colonel of the Sixth Wisconsin--an officer of marked ability and an intrepid soldier. There was another organization, in the Army of the Potomac, knownCutler was succeeded in 1864, by General Edward S. Bragg,--formerly Colonel of the Sixth Wisconsin--an officer of marked ability and an intrepid soldier. There was another organization, in the Army of the Potomac, known as the Iron Brigade, and it was in the same division with the Iron Brigade of the West. It was composed of the Second United States Sharpshooters, the Twenty-second, Twenty-fourth, Thirtieth, and Eighty-fourth New York, forming Hatch's (1st) Brigade, First Division, First Corps. But the Twenty-second, Twenty-fourth, and Thirtieth New York were two years regiments, and were mustered out in May, 1863, thereby breaking up the organization. The Eighty-fourth New York (14th Brooklyn) was an excep
August Willich (search for this): chapter 9
36th Illinois 204 44th Illinois 135 73d Illinois 114 74th Illinois 83 88th Illinois 103 22d Indiana 153 21st Michigan 83 2d Missouri 91 15th Missouri 115 24th Wisconsin 111   Total (during the war) 1,192 Willich's Willich was wounded at Resaca, and succeeded by Col. William H. Gibson. (1ST) Brigade. Wood's (3D) Division, Fourth Corps.   Killed and Died of Wounds. 25th Illinois 83 35th Illinois 109 89th Illinois 133 32d Indiana 171Willich was wounded at Resaca, and succeeded by Col. William H. Gibson. (1ST) Brigade. Wood's (3D) Division, Fourth Corps.   Killed and Died of Wounds. 25th Illinois 83 35th Illinois 109 89th Illinois 133 32d Indiana 171 68th Indiana 39 8th Kansas 105 15th Ohio 179 49th Ohio 202 15th Wisconsin 94   Total (during the war) 1,115 Harker's (3D) Brigade. Sheridan's (2D) Division, Fourth Corps.   Killed and Died of Wounds. 22d Illinois Infantry 147 27th Illinois Infantry 112 42d Illinois Infantry 181 51st Illinois Infantry 115 79th Illinois Infantry 85 3d Kentucky Infantry 109 64th Ohio Infantry 114 65th Ohio Infantry 126 125th Ohio Infantry Transferre
... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9