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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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China (China) (search for this): chapter 8
teen hundred men, and was scattered by Federal troops under Brigadier-General James A. Garfield. Its chief action was at Pound Gap, March 16, 1862. Brigadier-General Humphrey Marshall (U. S.M. A. 1832) was born in Frankfort, Kentucky, January 13, 1812. He resigned from the army the year after his graduation and became a lawyer. He went to the Mexican War as colonel of cavalry, and led a charge at Buena Vista. In 1849, he became a member of Congress, and, after being commissioner to China in 1852, served again until 1859. He entered the Confederate service, being made brigadier-general in October, 1861. At the head of a small force, sometimes called the Army of Eastern Kentucky, he undertook the conquest of that region, but was driven from it by Brigadier-General James A. Garfield in March, 1862. After this, he had several commands in Virginia and resigned from the service in June, 1863. He resumed his practice of law and was elected member of the Confederate Congress fro
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
d had temporary command of Hardee's Corps. He continued to hold his division in Cheatham's Corps, and at the battle of Franklin was killed, November 30, 1864. A brilliant charge at Chickamauga earned him the title of Stonewall of the West, and it was he who initiated the Order of the Southern Cross and was among the first to urge the advantages to the Confederates of colored troops. Confederate generals no. 7 Georgia (continued) Philip Cook leader in Gordon's attack on Fort Stedman. William M. Gardner, commander of the Post of Richmond, Va., in 1865. John K. Jackson, commanded a Reserve Corps Army of the Mississippi. Claudius C. Wilson, led a brigade in the Army of Tennessee. Isaac M. St. John, Commissary General, 1865. Bryan M. Thomas, led a brigade of Alabamians. G. Moxley Sorrell, staff officer with Longstreet. Dudley M. Dubois, led a brigade in Longstreet's Corps. Marcellus A. Stovall, led a brigade in Hood's Corps. Lucius J. Gartrell, led
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
this army, and now the troops in eastern Virginia and North Carolina were made part of it. By the end of July, 1862, the dicommanded the corps from time to time. A new corps of North Carolina and Virginia troops under Lieutenant-General R. H. And February, had been organized in a corps, and those in North Carolina under Bragg. The aggregate present of the old Army oft twenty thousand. The army surrendered to Sherman in North Carolina, April 26, 1865. General Braxton Bragg (U. S.M. A. end of the war he fought with the Army of Tennessee in North Carolina. He died, January 22, 1879. Army of the West Tenne conspicuous at Port Gibson and Vicksburg in 1863. North Carolina James G. Martin led a brigade defending Richmht at Antietam, Confederate generals--no. 15 North Carolina Alfred M. Scales led a North Carolina brigadewas sent to resist the onward march of Sherman through North Carolina, and he participated in the battle of Bentonville. He
Sailor's Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ongstreet's Corps. He was engaged at the battle of Chickamauga, commanding a brigade in McLaws' Division of the Left Wing. Returning to the East he was prominent in the Wilderness campaign, and in the Shenandoah he was with Ewell's Corps at Sailors' Creek, when his command was captured on April 6, 1865, and he was released from Fort Warren, Mass., July 24, of the same year. He was elected President of the State Senate and later became a judge of the Circuit Court of South Carolina. General Keefferson Davis. He was appointed major-general serving with the volunteer troops with temporary rank on February 7, 1865, the commission dating from October 20, 1864. On the same date he was also made full major-general. He was captured at Sailor's Creek, April 6, 1865, and was paroled six days later, which parole was extended until April 23, 1865. In addition to serving as aide to President Davis, General Lee was in command of military forces in the city of Richmond. In the latter part of
Chickasaw Bayou (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
sistant adjutant-general in New Mexico when the Civil War broke out. He was dismissed from the service in June, 1861, having enlisted as captain in the Confedate cavalry. He served with the forces that later became the Army of the West, and after the battle of Pea Ridge was made brigadier-general. He had a division in the Army of the West, and commanded the whole force temporarily in June, 1862. As major-general, he had a division with Pemberton's forces in the battle with Sherman at Chickasaw Bayou, December 26, 1862. In 1863, he was placed at the head of the Department of East Tennessee, and in 1864-65, he was in command of the Department of the Gulf, surrendering at Meridian, Mississippi, May 11, 1865. He was the founder of the Southern Historical Society, and from 1886 to 1889 was American minister to Colombia. He died in Peoria, Illinois, January 11, 1900. Confederate generals—No. 14 Missouri John B. Clark commanded a Cavalry brigade; engaged at Pea Ridge
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
o New Orleans, where he died, August 30, 1879. Confederate generals--no. 6 Georgia Howell Cobb, leader of Cobb's Georgia Legion. G. T. Anderson commanded a brigade in Longstreet's Corps. David E. Twiggs, in command in East Louisiana in 1861. Pierce M. B. Young, brilliant Cavalry leader. Goode Bryan led a Georgia brigade in Longstreet's Corps. Hugh W. Mercer led a Georgia brigade in the Army of Tennessee. David R. Jones, active leader at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. William M. Brown, defender of Savannah, December, 1864. Clement A. Evans, leader in the Army of Northern Virginia. Robert Toombs, defender of Lee's Right flank at Antietam. First Corps—Army of the Mississippi and of Tennessee Major-General Leonidas Polk commanded from June, 1861, to March, 1862, the First Division in the Western Department (No. 2), the troops of which were scattered along the Mississippi from Columbus, Kentucky, to Memphis, and in the interior of Tenn
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
f Tennessee at Chickamauga and remained in East Tennessee until April, 1864, when it rejoined the Ar 1863, he was sent with part of his corps to Tennessee and took command of the left wing at the batcommander of the Army of the Mississippi (or Tennessee), and led it into Kentucky in September, 186ongstreet's Corps. In September, he went to Tennessee with Longstreet's Corps, which he commanded tation. After the war he became a farmer in Tennessee, and was appointed postmaster of Nashville is, with the exception of Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri. He was sent to the Senate, brganization was denominated the Army of West Tennessee. To Price was assigned a corps, which contiartillery in the provisional army of the State of Tennessee. As brigadier-general, lie commanded a William F. Brantly commanded a brigade in Tennessee. Douglas H. Cooper, leader of Indian troopned to the command of all the cavalry in western Tennessee and northern Mississippi. In March and [20 more...]
Red River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
fter his repulse at Glorieta, March 28, 1862, he was driven back into Texas. He continued his service at the head of various commands in Louisiana, south of the Red River. After the war he entered the service of the Khedive of Egypt, where he was, from 1869 to 1873, engaged in building coast and river defenses. He died at Freder the west bank of the Mississippi near New Orleans in July, but was driven back by Weitzel and Franklin. The following year he was instrumental in defeating the Red River expedition. In September, 1864, he was sent to command the Department of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana, and surrendered to Major-General Canby, May 4,rmy of Northern Virginia. Joseph O. Shelby, Cavalry commander in Arkansas and Missouri battles. M. M. Parsons led a brigade in Price's division; defender of Red River. Joseph H. Cockrell, distinguished in Missouri campaigns; later U. S. Senator. John S. Marmaduke, leader of Cavalry West of the Mississippi. Daniel M. Fr
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
, he was given the District of Texas, which was afterward enlarged to include New Mexico and Arizona. Magruder recaptured Galveston, January 1, 1863, and kept the po lost an arm. Later, he was colonel of a regiment sent against the Indians in New Mexico. He resigned from the army to enter the Confederate service, and came into c forces on the Rio Grande above Fort Quitman, and those in the territories of New Mexico and Arizona. Its main object was the conquest of California. Brigadier-Generibley tent. The outbreak of the Civil War found him on an Indian campaign in New Mexico, serving as a major of dragoons, but he accepted a commission as brigadier-geconspicuous at New Orleans in 1862. Henry H. Sibley, conspicuous leader in New Mexico. Albert G. Blanchard led a brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia. Zebht at West Point, and served in the West, being assistant adjutant-general in New Mexico when the Civil War broke out. He was dismissed from the service in June, 1861
Payne Gap (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
For this General Floyd was relieved of his command. In November, 1862, he was in command of the Virginia State Line, and died at Abingdon, Virginia, August 26, 1863. Army of Eastern Kentucky A title applied to the troops under Brigadier-General Humphrey Marshall, consisting of the militia of Wise, Scott and Lee counties, in 1861. It was a small force of about fifteen hundred men, and was scattered by Federal troops under Brigadier-General James A. Garfield. Its chief action was at Pound Gap, March 16, 1862. Brigadier-General Humphrey Marshall (U. S.M. A. 1832) was born in Frankfort, Kentucky, January 13, 1812. He resigned from the army the year after his graduation and became a lawyer. He went to the Mexican War as colonel of cavalry, and led a charge at Buena Vista. In 1849, he became a member of Congress, and, after being commissioner to China in 1852, served again until 1859. He entered the Confederate service, being made brigadier-general in October, 1861. At t
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