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Dickinson (search for this): chapter 7
union God has made between well doing and well-being,--even then you could not keep slavery in peace till you got a new race to people these shores. The blood which has cleared the forest, tortured the earth of its secrets, made the ocean its vassal, and subjected every other race it has met, will never volunteer its own industry to forge gags for its own lips. You, therefore, who look forward to slavery and peace, make ready to sweep clean the continent, and see that Webster, Foot, and Dickinson be the Shem, Ham, and Japlet of the Ark you shall prepare. [Cheers.] The Carpathian Mountains may serve to shelter tyrants; the slope of Germany may bear up a race more familiar with the Greek text than the Greek phalanx; the wave of Russian rule may sweep so far westward, for aught I know, as to fill with miniature tyrants again the robber castles of the Rhine,--but this I do know: God has piled our Rocky Mountains as ramparts for freedom; He has scooped the valley of the Mississippi as
George S. Boutwell (search for this): chapter 7
or yourselves! There is Concord and Lexington and Bunker Hill, and there they will remain forever. Let us borrow the formula, and when anybody in the United States Senate doubts our position, let us cry, There is Massachusetts! Behold her, and judge for yourselves! There is George Thompson, welcomed by the heart, if he could not be by the pocket of the Commonwealth. [Cheers.] There is Horace Mann in, and Charles W. Upham out, and there they will remain forever. [Cheers.] There is George S. Boutwell in, and George N. Briggs out, and there may they remain forever. [Enthusiastic cheers.] I cannot however quite consent to say that our friend could not be heard in Faneuil Hall. That glorious old name does not belong to bricks and mortar. As the Scottish chief boasted that where McGregor sits is the head of the table, so where Freedom dwells, where all lips are free, wherever the foe of slavery is welcome, no matter whether an English or an African sun may have looked upon him, t
osed against all men of his own race, and the burden of proof on him to show that the claimant does not own him according to Southern law! Verily, gentlemen, our unprofessional eyes can see, or think they see, a difference worth discussing ! Mr. Clay says, in his letter to the Philadelphia Union Meeting, that the question now is, Whether this agitation against slavery shall put down the Union, or the Union be preserved, and that agitation be put down. There is no other alternative. What do to be hoodwinked, and eloquence to be gagged! The fetter and the chain, which, on the other side of the ocean, trade has worn away by the beneficent action of her waters, or Christianity melted in the fervor of her indignant rebuke! These, in Mr. Clay's opinion, it is our appropriate work to forge anew! We have not so read the scroll of our country's destiny. To the anointed eye, the planting of this continent is the exodus of the race out of the bondage of old and corrupt institutions. Th
Ellen Kossuth (search for this): chapter 7
t well have pleaded, in the face of Mr. Webster's recent eloquence, that fear of dethronement, anarchy, Russia, and a thousand ills, justified him in surrendering Kossuth. Would the world, would humanity, would even Mr. Webster, have said Amen to such a plea from his mouth? There may be times when States should say with the greatgo; it is not necessary to live! Perhaps Mr. Curtis may yet find this to be one of those occasions. One thing we know, the great senator told the Sultan that if Kossuth were given up, he could not tell how or when, but verily, Turkey would somehow have to look out for the consequences. I thank thee, Jew, for teaching me that word. Once on a time Emperor Georgia sent after our William and Ellen Kossuth; the Webster Whigs argued for their surrender; and Heaven has graciously permitted us to live and see both how and when they had to look out for the consequences. [Laughter and cheers.] Mr. Curtis defended the right of Massachusetts to surrender the fug
B. R. Curtis (search for this): chapter 7
s it will be found to be the case with laws. Add that to our trophies. Mr. B. R. Curtis--the only one of the speakers entitled to much influence or consideration the great Roman, It is necessary to go; it is not necessary to live! Perhaps Mr. Curtis may yet find this to be one of those occasions. One thing we know, the greatnd when they had to look out for the consequences. [Laughter and cheers.] Mr. Curtis defended the right of Massachusetts to surrender the fugitive slave, on the g a whole age longer, if it skulk Behind the shield of some fair-seeming name. Mr. Curtis forgot to finish his argument, and show us how, in present circumstances, it the surrender clause the only clause in our Constitution relating to slaves, Mr. Curtis's argument would have some shadow of claim to plausibility. But Massachusettbut for Massachusetts' justice and consistency. But, granting the whole of Mr. Curtis's argument, he did not touch, or even glance at, the popular objection to the
George Thompson (search for this): chapter 7
Welcome to George Thompson (1840). A reception to George Thompson, in Faneuil Hall, November George Thompson, in Faneuil Hall, November 15, 1850, was broken up by an angry mob. The meeting was therefore adjourned to Worcester, and suppthe fear of national rebuke at the hands of Mr. Thompson. I am afraid it was no such honorable sentnd especially so big and bitter a drop as George Thompson. [Cheers.] We should have chosen our timbster Whiggery, I mean,--as of hatred for George Thompson. [Cheers.] And it is in connection, part her, and judge for yourselves! There is George Thompson, welcomed by the heart, if he could not bRome for me. [Cheers.] Our welcome to George Thompson to-night is only the joy we have in grasp. [Cheers.] When, therefore, we recount to Mr. Thompson our success and marvellous progress, we areuent gentleman flat plagiarism? Besides, George Thompson has come to his Cuba, come where his starch better Father Mathew played his cards! Mr. Thompson comes here for the benefit of his health.
Rufus Choate (search for this): chapter 7
right hand. Our friend has dwelt long and most impressively on the objection brought against him, as a foreigner, for taking sides on American questions. Mr. Choate said in his speech at Faneuil Hall, If the philanthropist wishes to say anything about slavery, let him strike his blow in Cuba, let him strike it below the linconscious effect of our agitation. In the first place it is considered a settled thing that the Union is in danger! Nothing less, it seems, would have induced Mr. Choate and all the Messrs. Curtises to come forth in its defence. Put that down as one evidence of success. It used to be said that characters which needed defence neuil Hall to-night, talk with such thoughtless impudence, of putting down discussion, remember that whom God would destroy, he first makes mad. Were it not so, Mr. Choate would be the first man to laugh at the spectacle of himself, a very respectable lawyer and somewhat eloquent declaimer of the Suffolk bar, coolly asserting with
cheers.] I cannot however quite consent to say that our friend could not be heard in Faneuil Hall. That glorious old name does not belong to bricks and mortar. As the Scottish chief boasted that where McGregor sits is the head of the table, so where Freedom dwells, where all lips are free, wherever the foe of slavery is welcome, no matter whether an English or an African sun may have looked upon him, there is Faneuil Hall. [Cheers.] Ubi Libertas, ibi patria was Franklin's motto, which Bancroft's lines render well enough,--Where dwell the brave, the generous, and the free, Oh, there is Rome — no other Rome for me. [Cheers.] Our welcome to George Thompson to-night is only the joy we have in grasping his hand, and seeing him with our own eyes. But we do not feel that, for the last fifteen years, he has been absent from us, much less from the battle to whose New England phalanx we welcome him to-night. Every blow struck for the right in England is felt wherever English is spok
George N. Briggs (search for this): chapter 7
oncord and Lexington and Bunker Hill, and there they will remain forever. Let us borrow the formula, and when anybody in the United States Senate doubts our position, let us cry, There is Massachusetts! Behold her, and judge for yourselves! There is George Thompson, welcomed by the heart, if he could not be by the pocket of the Commonwealth. [Cheers.] There is Horace Mann in, and Charles W. Upham out, and there they will remain forever. [Cheers.] There is George S. Boutwell in, and George N. Briggs out, and there may they remain forever. [Enthusiastic cheers.] I cannot however quite consent to say that our friend could not be heard in Faneuil Hall. That glorious old name does not belong to bricks and mortar. As the Scottish chief boasted that where McGregor sits is the head of the table, so where Freedom dwells, where all lips are free, wherever the foe of slavery is welcome, no matter whether an English or an African sun may have looked upon him, there is Faneuil Hall. [Ch
imself, a very respectable lawyer and somewhat eloquent declaimer of the Suffolk bar, coolly asserting with a threatening brow, meant to be like that of Jove, to the swarming millions of the free States, that this discussion must stop! To such nonsense, whether from him, or the angry lips of his wire-puller in front of the Revere House, the only fitting answer is Sam Weller's repetition to Pickwick, It can't be done. [Cheers and laughter.] The like was never attempted but once before, when Xerxes flung chains at the Hellespont- And o'er that foolish deed has pealed The long laugh of a world! Oh, no! this chasm in the forum all the Clay in the land cannot fill. [Cheers.] This rent in the mantle all the Websters in the mill cannot weave up. [Cheers.] Perpetuate slavery amid such a race as ours! Impossible! Re-annex the rest of the continent, if you will; pile fugitive slave bills till they rival the Andes; dissolve, were it possible, the union God has made between well doing
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