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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Halifax (Canada) (search for this): chapter 8
VIII.} 1763. July. expenses. Reed's Reed, i. 32. Halifax, one of the triumvirate, had had the experience of d, as his confidential friend, Ellis, a favorite of Halifax, and for several years Governor of Georgia; a stateade chap. VIII.} 1763. July. eight years before to Halifax, for gaining an imperial revenue by issuing exchequo await the decision. But on Wednesday, the third, Halifax, with Egremont at his side, harangued the king for tration or to form another from their adversaries. Halifax turned this in all the ways that eloquence could di Your majesty has three options, said Grenville and Halifax; to strengthen the hands of the present ministry, oaudience lasted nearly two hours. The king proposed Halifax for the Treasury: Pitt was willing he should have tt for a generation. Of the Secretaries of State, Halifax, as the elder, had his choice of departments, and t details of the colonial administration belonged to Halifax. No sooner was the ministry definitively establish
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
rnard to Sec. of 16 Feb. 1763, and same to same, 25 Oct. 1763. On the extension of the British frontier by the cession of Canada, and the consequent security of the interior, New-England towns, under grants from Wentworth, the Governor of New-Hampshire, rose up on both sides of the Connecticut, and extended to the borders of Lake Champlain. But New-York coveted the lands, and under its old charter to the Duke of York, had long disputed with NewHamp-shire the jurisdiction of the country west of Connecticut River. The British government had hitherto regarded the contest with indifference; but Colden now urged the Board of Trade to annex to New-York all of Massachusetts and of New-Hampshire west of the Connecticut River. The New-England Governments, he reasoned, are all formed on republican principles, and those principles are zealously inculcated in the minds of their youth. The government of New-York, on the contrary, is established as nearly as may be after the model of the En
Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
as commissioned to propose a coalition between Pitt and Temple Calcraft to Lord Temple, 10 Augusence from the king's counsels and presence, and Pitt's concurrence in a coalition of parties and theot to be printed in the Bedford Correspondence. Pitt was willing to treat, Grenville's Diary, in xy. The place of secretary now seemed to await Pitt's acceptance. Your majesty has three options, to Neville, in Bedford Cor. III. 238, 241. For Pitt's account to Wood, see Wood's Letter, in the Ch one. Then openness was pushed to an extreme. Pitt's summons to court was an unsealed note, as lite them down, which Pitt declined to do. Some of Pitt's suggestions were so offensive to the king, ths griefs, pleading his adhesion to the king, on Pitt's leaving the cabinet in 1761; the barbarous usrs. The king proposed Halifax for the Treasury: Pitt was willing he should have the Paymaster's placf the Bedford party and of Grenville, was, said Pitt, a treaty of connivance; Lord Melcombe said, It[1 more...]
Connecticut River (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
up on both sides of the Connecticut, and extended to the borders of Lake Champlain. But New-York coveted the lands, and under its old charter to the Duke of York, had long disputed with NewHamp-shire the jurisdiction of the country west of Connecticut River. The British government had hitherto regarded the contest with indifference; but Colden now urged the Board of Trade to annex to New-York all of Massachusetts and of New-Hampshire west of the Connecticut River. The New-England Governments,Connecticut River. The New-England Governments, he reasoned, are all formed on republican principles, and those principles are zealously inculcated in the minds of their youth. The government of New-York, on the contrary, is established as nearly as may be after the model of the English Constitution. Can it, then, be good policy to diminish the extent of jurisdiction in his majesty's province of New-York, to extend the power and influence of the others'? Colden to the Board of Trade, New-York, 26 Sept., 1763. Little was the issue of t
Newcastle (Canada) (search for this): chapter 8
iament, nor the favor of the court. To strengthen his government, the king, conforming to the views sketched by Bute in the previous April, Bute to Bedford, 2 April, 1763: I once gone, it will be very hard for me to believe that the Duke of Newcastle will, with Lord Hardwicke, &c. continue a violent or peevish opposition, &c &c. Bedford Cor. III. 226. but against the positive and repeated advice Grenville's Diary, in Grenville Papers, II. 191. of his three ministers, directed Egremont to invite Lord Hardwicke to enter the cabinet, as President of the Council. It is impossible for me, said Hardwicke, at an interview on the first day of August, The date of Newcastle's letter, in Albemarle's Memoirs of Rockingham, i. 169, is given as of June 30, 1763, a mistake, for the letter refers to the conversation held in August. to accept an employment, whilst all my friends are out of court. Hardwicke to his son, 5 August, 1763, in Harris, 370. The king, said Egremont, cannot bri
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
the sole judge of elections. Gov. Thomas Boone to Lords of Trade, 15 Sept. 1763. Petition to the king of the Commons House of Assembly of the Province of South Carolina, in Boone's letter of 10 Sept. 1763. The arbitrary and imperious governor was too clearly in the wrong to be sustained; South Carolina to Garth, their South Carolina to Garth, their agent, 2 July, 1766. but the controversy which had already continued for a twelvemonth, and was now at its height, lasted long enough to train the statesmen of South Carolina to systematical opinions on the rights of their legislature, and of the king's power in matters of their privilege. The details of the colonial administraSouth Carolina to systematical opinions on the rights of their legislature, and of the king's power in matters of their privilege. The details of the colonial administration belonged to Halifax. No sooner was the ministry definitively established, than Grenville, as the head of the treasury, proceeded to redeem the promise made to the House of Commons of an American revenue. The revenue from the customs in America could by no means produce a sufficient fund to meet the expenses of its military
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
s for his reward. McCulloh, a crown officer in North Carolina, and agent for an English company concerned in had for many years been a speculator in land in North Carolina, and acted as the land agent of George A. Selwyt that time, nor was he himself ever, agent for North Carolina. His son, Henry Eustace McCulloh, like his fat Roanoke, as well as a member of the Council of North Carolina. [Tryon to Board of Trade, 28 April, 1767. BoaMcCulloh was appointed agent to the province of North Carolina by the Assembly [see America and West Indies, v1769 he was appointed agent for the province of North Carolina by an act of the Legislature. [1769, Nov. 27, C79. [Letter from D. L. Swain, late Governor of North Carolina.] Alexander McCulloh, the nephew of Henry, became also a member of the Council of North Carolina. On reading the note in Grenville Papers, II. 373, 374, Iries respecting Henry McCulloh. The records of North Carolina, at Raleigh, have been thoroughly searched on t
Cornwall (Canada) (search for this): chapter 8
l tax was common in America; but, applied by parliament, would fall unequally upon the colonies holding slaves. The difficulty in collecting quit-rents, proved that a land tax would meet with formidable obstacles. An excise was thought of, but kept in reserve. An issue of exchequer bills to be kept in circulation as the currency of the continent, was urged on the ministry, but conflicted with the policy of acts of parliament against the use of paper money in the colonies. Every body Cornwall in Cavendish. who reasoned on the subject, decided for chap. VIII.} 1763. Sept. a stamp tax, as certain of collection; and in America, where lawsuits were frequent, as likely to be very productive. A stamp act had been proposed to Sir St. Robert Walpole; it had been thought of by Pelham; it had been almost resolved upon in 1755; it had been pressed upon Pitt; it seems beyond a doubt to have been a part of the system adopted in the ministry of Bute, and was sure of the support of Charles T
Rockingham (search for this): chapter 8
, directed Egremont to invite Lord Hardwicke to enter the cabinet, as President of the Council. It is impossible for me, said Hardwicke, at an interview on the first day of August, The date of Newcastle's letter, in Albemarle's Memoirs of Rockingham, i. 169, is given as of June 30, 1763, a mistake, for the letter refers to the conversation held in August. to accept an employment, whilst all my friends are out of court. Hardwicke to his son, 5 August, 1763, in Harris, 370. The king, said; or, which is more probable, aware that the actual ministry could not go on, was himself deceived by his own presumptuously hopeful nature into a belief that those who made the overture must carry it through, he summoned Newcastle, Devonshire, Rockingham, and Hardwicke Hardwicke in Harris, III. 379. to come to London as his council. From his own point of view, there was no unreasonableness W. Gerard Hamilton in Chatham Cor. II. 378. in his demands. But to the court it seemed otherwise
ercise the right of free chap. VIII.} 1763. Sept. discussion. To demand a revenue by instructions Sept. from the king, and to enforce them by stringent coercive measures, was beyond the power of the prerogatisve, under the system established at the revolution. When New-York had failed to make appropriations for the civil service, a bill was prepared to be laid before parliament, giving the usual revenue; and this bill having received the approbation of the great whig lawyers, Northey and Raymond, was the precedent which overcame Grenville's scruples about taxing the colonies without first allowing them representatives. Knox, in a pamphlet, of which George Grenville was part author. It was settled then that there must be a military establishment in America of twenty regiments; that after the first year its expenses must be defrayed by America; that the American colonies themselves, with their various charters, never would agree to vote such a revenue, and that parliament must do
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