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Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ledges of solid rock. These taxed the effort and patience of the laborers, who were mostly native born, as emigration from Ireland, Italy and Hungary was then but slight. The shore of Medford Pond, or, as it is now termed, Mystic Lake, was originally intended for the southern terminus, but the canal was built six miles further, and ended at the Charlestown mill-pond, special legislation authorizing the extension. But for this, the remaining distance would have been covered by the pond and Mystic, or, as then called, Medford River. Whether the shallowness of the upper river, or its serpentine course caused the continuation of the artificial channel is unknown. Briefly described, the canal was a ditch thirty feet wide and four feet deep below its banks. Sometimes these were below the natural surface of the ground, but in many places, artificial embankments were required to preserve the various levels, of which there were eight. Between these latter, which varied from one to six
Livingston (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
towed in bands and passed the locks singly. Steam navigation had become an assured fact on the Hudson river in 1807, one year before Mr. Sullivan took charge of the canal, but years before the canal went into operation a steamboat was successfully operated upon the Connecticut river, and its owner and inventor was interviewed by Fulton, who, it seems, only made successful application of the inventions of John Fitch in Delaware and Samuel Morey in New Hampshire, assisted by the wealth of Livingston. Morey, to his dying day, complained bitterly of their treatment of him, saying that the cusses had stolen his invention. Not despairing, however, he invented a new form of engine, for which he secured a patent. This was acquired by Sullivan, after his experience with a heavy engine from Philadelphia, which he wrote had a damaging effect upon the boats used upon the canal. Full of hope, Mr. Sullivan purchased the shops and water privilege at Medford, now within the bounds of Wincheste
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 1
th James Sullivan, afterward governor of Massachusetts, was the great enterprise of its time, the Middlesex Canal. So comprehensive was the idea of Judge Sullivan, that fully completed, it would have resulted in an inland waterway from Boston to Canada. Its charter was granted by the General Court, June 22, 1793, and immediately received the signature of the governor, John Hancock and the corporators organized by the choice of James Sullivan for President, and Col. Loammi Baldwin of Woburn andmployees (nameless here) disappeared with $10,000 of the funds of the canal and of the associated Boating Co., of which $3,757.97 belonged to the Middlesex Canal. In the quaint language of Caleb Eddy, he thought it was better to be a rogue in Canada than an honest man in his own country, and also that in his hasty flight he left behind some property, such as canal boats and a dwelling house. While Mr. Eddy took prompt action to secure something from these, it is doubtful if canal boats we
Hungary (Hungary) (search for this): chapter 1
ards of one hundred feet in width to a depth of ten feet to form the canal bed before the embankments were made. This difficulty overcome and Maple Meadow Brook (the source of Ipswich River) crossed, a loop, called the Ox-bow, had to be made around a hill. Much of the work was through a sandy soil, but in various places its course could not avoid ledges of solid rock. These taxed the effort and patience of the laborers, who were mostly native born, as emigration from Ireland, Italy and Hungary was then but slight. The shore of Medford Pond, or, as it is now termed, Mystic Lake, was originally intended for the southern terminus, but the canal was built six miles further, and ended at the Charlestown mill-pond, special legislation authorizing the extension. But for this, the remaining distance would have been covered by the pond and Mystic, or, as then called, Medford River. Whether the shallowness of the upper river, or its serpentine course caused the continuation of the artif
s as will be most advantageous to all parties. I am, gentlemen, very respectfully, Your obt. servant, P. T. Jackson. Pres. B. & L. R. R. The result of the conference thus suggested was the building of the embankment at West Medford, carrying the railway nine and one-half feet above the canal (when full), with abutments thirty-four feet apart, and an additional wall supporting the tow-path. During the early thirties the work on the railway progressed, the canal company, to quote Mr. Dame, assisting in the preparation for its own obsequies, not only in the delivery of the stone ties on which the rails were laid, but in the transportation to Lowell of the two locomotives (Hercules and Stevenson), purchased in England. There they were set up; and as thirty-three years before, the waters of the Concord flowed southward toward Boston, so did the first steam train take the same direction on June 24, 1835. In '38 the dividends of the canal dropped to $20 per share, but still h
John Bradfho (search for this): chapter 1
law provides and that all other perfsons upon the plantation whatsoever enjoyned by law hall make good each man his proportion which is two [ ] of powder & three pound of balls per man dureing the time of theire abode upon the plantation aboue fayd. . . . 14 June 1678 Goodman: Hall Jr by money:0-15-0 Tho: willows in money0-07-6 Goodman: whitcomb & Daniell woodward0-05-0 mr Nathaniel wade0-05-0 Steven willows0-02-6 Jno. whitmore0-2-6 peter Tuft0.02-6 Goodman ffillebrowne0-05-0 John Bradfho0-02-6 —— 17-6 Strangers in Medford, (continued from Vol. 6, no. 4). Names.From. Date.Warned out.Remarks. Goldthwait, Benjamin Major. Tavern keeper.Boston, June 2, 1760Tenant of Col. Royall.   Charity (wife)   Children Gould, AbrahamMar. court, 1758Servant of Benj. Peirce. Gould, ElizabethReading, April 12, 1762In house of Nathan Tufts. Gray, John, and familyDec. 28, 1750 Green, Francis (?)Aug. 31, 1797 Green, IsaacApr. 16, 1784(Wife and family.) Greenleaf, Step
Stevenson (search for this): chapter 1
of the embankment at West Medford, carrying the railway nine and one-half feet above the canal (when full), with abutments thirty-four feet apart, and an additional wall supporting the tow-path. During the early thirties the work on the railway progressed, the canal company, to quote Mr. Dame, assisting in the preparation for its own obsequies, not only in the delivery of the stone ties on which the rails were laid, but in the transportation to Lowell of the two locomotives (Hercules and Stevenson), purchased in England. There they were set up; and as thirty-three years before, the waters of the Concord flowed southward toward Boston, so did the first steam train take the same direction on June 24, 1835. In '38 the dividends of the canal dropped to $20 per share, but still hopeful, the managers kept the canal in order, and in '41 built, at a cost of $5,000, what remains today a monument in granite, the aqueduct at Shawsheen river. While we may wonder at such outlay under existi
Benjamin Willis (search for this): chapter 1
, 1762In house of Nathan Tufts. Gray, John, and familyDec. 28, 1750 Green, Francis (?)Aug. 31, 1797 Green, IsaacApr. 16, 1784(Wife and family.) Greenleaf, Stephen   Maria (wife)Brookline, Mayor June, 1764Dec. 3, 1764 Greenough, Andrew (Hall?)Boston, September, 1769Oct. 8, 1770In family of Andrew Hall. Greenough, JohnJan. 30, 1791 Hadley, AbigailStoneham, Aug. 23, 1766In family of Widow Sarah Connory. Hadley, David Son of Samuel.Stoneham, February, 1762Jan. 1, 1763Apprentice to Benj. Willis. Hadley, SamuelStoneham, Nov. 25, 1762Sept. 1, 1763Tenants of Ebenr Harriden.   Abigail (wife)   Antony.   Jonathan   Abigail   Moses   Hulda Hadley, Samuel, Jr.Stoneham, Apr. 6, 1768Tenant of Thos. Sprague   Rebecca (wife) Hains, AquilaBostonAug. 9, 1763A transient person. Hains, DorcasBoston,June, 1766Mar. 2, 1767Scotchman. Gardener. In employ of Col. Royall. Hair, JohnBoston,April 21, 1769Oct. 8, 1770 Hall, AndrewBoston,September, 1769.   (wife)   Abi
Thomas Sprague (search for this): chapter 1
, 1764 Greenough, Andrew (Hall?)Boston, September, 1769Oct. 8, 1770In family of Andrew Hall. Greenough, JohnJan. 30, 1791 Hadley, AbigailStoneham, Aug. 23, 1766In family of Widow Sarah Connory. Hadley, David Son of Samuel.Stoneham, February, 1762Jan. 1, 1763Apprentice to Benj. Willis. Hadley, SamuelStoneham, Nov. 25, 1762Sept. 1, 1763Tenants of Ebenr Harriden.   Abigail (wife)   Antony.   Jonathan   Abigail   Moses   Hulda Hadley, Samuel, Jr.Stoneham, Apr. 6, 1768Tenant of Thos. Sprague   Rebecca (wife) Hains, AquilaBostonAug. 9, 1763A transient person. Hains, DorcasBoston,June, 1766Mar. 2, 1767Scotchman. Gardener. In employ of Col. Royall. Hair, JohnBoston,April 21, 1769Oct. 8, 1770 Hall, AndrewBoston,September, 1769.   (wife)   AbigailChildren And Andrew Greenough.   Elizabeth   Mary   Anna   Rebeckah   Eunice   Susannah Hall JohnPortsmouth,Apr. 14, 1762Jan. 1, 1763Single man. In employ of Col. Royall. Hall, JohnBoston,
Samuel Thompson (search for this): chapter 1
ved (at Billerica) the first turf, when the work of excavation actually commenced nearly sixteen months after the granting of the charter, the intervening time having been occupied in acquiring title to the land and surveying in the route. Samuel Thompson of Woburn made the preliminary survey, and the work was under the charge of Col. Baldwin, whose interest the enterprise only ceased with his life in 1808. During work in Wilmington, was discovered the tree from which the famous Baldwin apple originated. Mr. Thompson, who was a soldier of the French War, and whose diary is replete with interest, seems to have labored under a disadvantage, but his work led up to a complete survey by an expert survey, Samuel Weston. He found that the Merrimack River at Chelmsford was lower than the highest point the canal would traverse, instead of higher, as was at first supposed; so that other water than that of the Merrimack must fill the canal in its course through the Middlesex towns to the Ch
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