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is moment, through the retreating North Carolinians, the Seventh Georgia regiment, Colonel Wilson, of Anderson's brigade, Toombs's division, with fixed bayonets and the steadiness of veterans, charged the rifle pits and drove the enemy from them with Anderson bad led two of his regiments (the 7th and 8th Georgia) into action, and held two others in reserve, while Brig. Gen. Toombs advanced with his own brigade, under the immediate command of Brig.-Gen. Sommer close to the scenes of action, and lied the troops under a terrific fire, and by his voice and example entirely treatability their steadiness. Brigadier General Toombs had in the morning, by my order, detached from his division Col. Anderson's brigade to support Brigadier General just before the enemy ceased the vigor his attack, and in time to share its dangers. Brigadier General commanding Toombs's brigade, (the carter being in command of the division,) showed his usual promptness and courage. Col. Levy, of the
0th Louisiana marching to its place under a heavy fire, with the accuracy of a parades drill. The other regiments were assigned positions out of the range of fire. In addition, Gen. McLeon placed the whole of his division under arms, ready to move as circumstances might require. Col. Anderson bad led two of his regiments (the 7th and 8th Georgia) into action, and held two others in reserve, while Brig. Gen. Toombs advanced with his own brigade, under the immediate command of Brig.-Gen. Sommer close to the scenes of action, and by my order, having just arrived, placed two regiments of this brigade in action, retaining the rest as a reserves. These dispositions rendered our position perfectly secure, and the enemy suffering from his two repulses, darkness put an to the contest. The dispositions of Gen. McLaws were skillfully made. His whole bearing and conduct is deserving of the highest commendation. I cannot designate all the many gallant officers and private
l Cobb's command formed a part, hearing the serious firing, he tend to the scene of action, and exhibited great coolness and judgment in his arrangement. The 10th Louisiana, 15th Virginia, a part of the 17th Mississippi, and the 11th Alabama, were ordered up as reserves, and were placed in position, the 10th Louisiana marching to its place under a heavy fire, with the accuracy of a parades drill. The other regiments were assigned positions out of the range of fire. In addition, Gen. McLeon placed the whole of his division under arms, ready to move as circumstances might require. Col. Anderson bad led two of his regiments (the 7th and 8th Georgia) into action, and held two others in reserve, while Brig. Gen. Toombs advanced with his own brigade, under the immediate command of Brig.-Gen. Sommer close to the scenes of action, and by my order, having just arrived, placed two regiments of this brigade in action, retaining the rest as a reserves. These dispositions rende
vanced in two heavy columns--one along the old York road, and the other along the Warwick road, and, on the 5th of April. appeared simultaneously along the whole front of our line, from Minor's farm to Yorktown. I have no accurate data upon which to base an exact statement of his force, but, from various sources of information, I was satisfied that I had before me the enemy's Army of Potomac, under the command of Gen. McClellan, with the exception of the two corps d' armee of Banks and McDowell respectively, forming an aggregate number of certainly not less than 100,000 men, since ascertained to have been 120,000. On every portion of my lines, he attacked us with a furious cannonading and musketry, which was responded to with effect by our batteries and troops of the line. His skirmishers were also well thrown forward on this and the succeeding day, and energetically felt our whole line, but were everywhere repulsed by the steadiness of our troops. Thus, with 5,000
position. We had only three pieces in position at that point, but two of them could not be used with much effect, and were rarely fired, so that we were constrained to reply with one six pounder of the Troop Artillery, Cobb's Georgia Legion, Capt. Stanley, under the particular charge of Lieut. Pope. This piece was served with the greatest accuracy and effect, and by the coolness and skill with which it was handled the great odds against us was almost counterbalanced. By 3½ P. M., the intensiomptness and courage. Col. Levy, of the 2d Louisiana regiment, was the Colonel commanding at Dam No. 1 and evinced judgment, courage, and high soldierly qualities in his conduct and arrangements, which I desire specially to commend. Capt. Stanley was in command of two pieces of artillery, including the six pounder so effectively served. Both he and Lieut Pope conducted themselves with skill and courage. Capt. Jordan's piece was in a very exposed place, and was soon disabled, aft
rs pressing us closely in front of Yorktown, Brig.-Gen. Early ordered a sorted to be made from the redoubts, for the purpose of dislodging him from Palmentary's peach orchard. This was effected in the most gallant manner by the 2d Florida. Col. Ward and 2d Mississippi Battalion, Lt. Col. Taylor, all under the command of Col. Ward. The quick and reckless charge of our men, by throwing the enemy into a hasty flight, enabled us to effect, with little loss, an enterprise of great hazard agCol. Ward. The quick and reckless charge of our men, by throwing the enemy into a hasty flight, enabled us to effect, with little loss, an enterprise of great hazard against a superior force, supported by artillery, when the least wavering or hesitation on our part would have been attended with great loss. The Warwick line, upon which we rested, may be briefly described, as follows: Warwick river rises very near York river, and about a mile and a half to the right of Yorktown. Yorktown and Redoubts Nos. 4, and 5, united by long curtains and flanked by rifle-pits, for the left of the line, until, at the commencement of the military road, it reaches Wa
t. In a few days the object of his delay was apparent. In every direction in front of our lines, through the intervening woods and along the open fields, earthworks began to appear. Through the energetic action of the Government reinforcements began to pour in, and each hour the army of the Peninsula grew stronger and stronger, until all anxiety passed from my mind as to the result of an attack upon us. The enemy's skirmishers pressing us closely in front of Yorktown, Brig.-Gen. Early ordered a sorted to be made from the redoubts, for the purpose of dislodging him from Palmentary's peach orchard. This was effected in the most gallant manner by the 2d Florida. Col. Ward and 2d Mississippi Battalion, Lt. Col. Taylor, all under the command of Col. Ward. The quick and reckless charge of our men, by throwing the enemy into a hasty flight, enabled us to effect, with little loss, an enterprise of great hazard against a superior force, supported by artillery, when t
o fall back. At this moment, through the retreating North Carolinians, the Seventh Georgia regiment, Colonel Wilson, of Anderson's brigade, Toombs's division, with fixed bayonets and the steadiness of veterans, charged the rifle pits and drove the et Brigadier General Howell Cobb, who was in command at that point, forming, the 2d Louisiana, 7th and 8th Georgia, of Col. Anderson's brigades, the 15th and 24th Georgia, and Cobb's Legion, in line of battle on our front, received the attack with graddition, Gen. McLeon placed the whole of his division under arms, ready to move as circumstances might require. Col. Anderson bad led two of his regiments (the 7th and 8th Georgia) into action, and held two others in reserve, while Brig. Gen. atability their steadiness. Brigadier General Toombs had in the morning, by my order, detached from his division Col. Anderson's brigade to support Brigadier General Cobb. and late in the evening, when ordered forward by me, promptly and energ
forces in such a manner as to accomplish these objects with the least risk possible, under the circumstances of great hazard which surrounded the little Army I commanded. I had prepared, as my real line of defence, positions in advance, at Harwood's and Young's Mills. Both flanks of this line were defended by boggy and difficult streams and swamps. In addition, the left flank was defended by elaborate fortifications at ship Point, connected by a broken line of redoubts, crossing theed in fortifying were taken from me and discharged by superior orders, in December last, and a delay of nine weeks consequently occurred before I could reorganize the laborers for the engineers. Keeping, then, only small bodies of troops at Harwood's and Young's Mills, and at Ship Point, I distributed my remaining forces along the Warwick line, embracing a front from Yorktown to Minor's farm of twelve miles, and from the latter place to Mulberry Island Point of one and a half miles. I
es, the 15th and 24th Georgia, and Cobb's Legion, in line of battle on our front, received the attack with great firmness, and the enemy recoiled with loss from the steady fire of our troops, before reaching the middle of the water. Brigadier General McLaws, commanding the second division, of which General Cobb's command formed a part, hearing the serious firing, he tend to the scene of action, and exhibited great coolness and judgment in his arrangement. The 10th Louisiana, 15th Virgid two regiments of this brigade in action, retaining the rest as a reserves. These dispositions rendered our position perfectly secure, and the enemy suffering from his two repulses, darkness put an to the contest. The dispositions of Gen. McLaws were skillfully made. His whole bearing and conduct is deserving of the highest commendation. I cannot designate all the many gallant officers and privates who distaining themselves, and respectfully call the attention of the Commanding
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