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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 28, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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Follansbee (search for this): article 2
r patrons, say no paper ever started in New York has, in six months, met with such general patronage, but the currency so upsets and batters prices, and values, and everything, in such times, that newspaper printing is a Ingar we would rather not indulge in. The owners of the various tugboats plying about the harbor, at a general meeting this morning, resolved to raise their charges in future from twelve to fifteen dollars per hour. The Sixth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, Col. Follansbee, arrived here from Boston this morning. After eating a hearty breakfast they took a steamer for Annapolis. The weather at last exhibits symptoms of a change for the better. We have had no rain as yet, it is true, but there is, a fair promise of it.--An hour's "heavy wet" would be worth millions to the farmers in the country round about, and millions more to the consumers of vegetables and other country produce that are held at exorbitant prices in anticipation of a short crop, ow
ommunications are soon restored — Destruction of property and robbery of stores do not involve impoverishment. Moreover, they have no natural effect upon the main movements of the armies. They are at most an interruption. We do not know of an instance in which they have compelled an enemy to retreat or to yield a strong position. Our own raids have been more or less failures. At the time of their occurrence we had glowing accounts of the raids of Stoneman, Sheridan, Averill, Wilson, and Kautz, and of the dash and brilliancy of their opponents. But beyond the loss of hundreds of gallant men, and some of our finest officers, and horses without number, to what did they practically amount? How will the columns of profit and loss when added up balance? We can have no better illustration of the practical result of these expeditions than that afforded by the recent visit to our doors. On the one hand, we have lost property, but we are very far from being ruined. On the other, the m
ere the growing crops required their labor to the various camps established for their reception. This, too, in excess of what was due from Kentucky. And in Southwestern Kentucky an office, using gunboats and Government transports as aids, was actively engaged with negro troops in forcibly taking hundreds of negroes from the fields to his camp; in many instances taking all the hands on large farms, leaving the crops to perish for want of cultivation. The Yankee editor of the Chronicle (Forney, the pimp,) holds the following language about a people that were once the proudest and quickest to resent Yankee insolence in the old Union. We predict that before the last 500,000 draft is made Gov Bramlette and his slaveholding friends will be as completely prostrated as the slave power of Maryland has been. The damage Done by the invaders. The Frederick (Md) Examiner relates some incidents of the late invasion of that county and city. It appears that the ransom of $200,000
Boston this morning. After eating a hearty breakfast they took a steamer for Annapolis. The weather at last exhibits symptoms of a change for the better. We have had no rain as yet, it is true, but there is, a fair promise of it.--An hour's "heavy wet" would be worth millions to the farmers in the country round about, and millions more to the consumers of vegetables and other country produce that are held at exorbitant prices in anticipation of a short crop, owing to drought. General Dix, you will see, has justituted proceedings against the editor of the Newark Mercury, for a treasonable article in its issue of yesterday, counseling resistance to the draft. It would not be at all surprising now it similar proceedings should be instituted, for like offences, against two weekly papers published in this city. Both have been for some time past publishing ferocious articles against the draft, but if proceeded against at all, it will probably be by civil process. Another
cluded to refer the whole matter back to the two Governments for reconsideration. All negotiations having been terminated Mr Greeley, in company whit Mr Ray, Private Secretary of Mr Lincoln, catted upon the Commissioners at the Clifton House, on the side, where a protracted and pleasant interview was held, and the various questions under consideration were discussed at length. Mr Greeley left the Falls for New York on this afternoon's train. It is understood that the Commissioners, with Sanders and Jewett, who are both here, are to remain and carry on negotiations with the Democrats.--A letter is to be prepared for the Chicago Convention, in which the Commissioners will hold out strong assurances of a restoration of the Union under Democratic auspices. The whole movement is regarded by many as a mere scheme to entrap the Administration into a false position before the country and the world for the benefit of the disunion Democrats Raids that don't pay. The Baltimore Ame
he failure of the late "peace negotiations," says: After considerable correspondence between the parties, it was concluded to refer the whole matter back to the two Governments for reconsideration. All negotiations having been terminated Mr Greeley, in company whit Mr Ray, Private Secretary of Mr Lincoln, catted upon the Commissioners at the Clifton House, on the side, where a protracted and pleasant interview was held, and the various questions under consideration were discussed at length. Mr Greeley left the Falls for New York on this afternoon's train. It is understood that the Commissioners, with Sanders and Jewett, who are both here, are to remain and carry on negotiations with the Democrats.--A letter is to be prepared for the Chicago Convention, in which the Commissioners will hold out strong assurances of a restoration of the Union under Democratic auspices. The whole movement is regarded by many as a mere scheme to entrap the Administration into a false position bef
efer the whole matter back to the two Governments for reconsideration. All negotiations having been terminated Mr Greeley, in company whit Mr Ray, Private Secretary of Mr Lincoln, catted upon the Commissioners at the Clifton House, on the side, where a protracted and pleasant interview was held, and the various questions under consideration were discussed at length. Mr Greeley left the Falls for New York on this afternoon's train. It is understood that the Commissioners, with Sanders and Jewett, who are both here, are to remain and carry on negotiations with the Democrats.--A letter is to be prepared for the Chicago Convention, in which the Commissioners will hold out strong assurances of a restoration of the Union under Democratic auspices. The whole movement is regarded by many as a mere scheme to entrap the Administration into a false position before the country and the world for the benefit of the disunion Democrats Raids that don't pay. The Baltimore American has co
demolished everything they could lay their hands on. The house was entirely emptied of its contents. The house of Mr C Keefer Thoman, which was occupied by the Union forces, suffered severely by the fire of the enemy. One of the shells striking it entered the dining room, and bursting occasioned considerable damage. During the fight Mr Thomas and family were in the sellar, all of whom escaped unhurt. Among the articles taken from his house were the clothing of his negroes. The barn of Mr Best, on the farm of Col Charles E Trail, was struck by a shell and destroyed. The house of Frank Maniz, on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, with part of his furniture and all the railroad property, were fired by the rebels and entirely consumed. Previous to the entry into this city, on the evening of the evacuation of our city by Gen Wallace, these highway robbers visited the residence of Col George R. Dennis, west of this city, on the Harper's Ferry turnpike, and, after helping themselv
James F. Jacques (search for this): article 2
n Market. Who was the Yankee "Price Commissioner?" Col. James F. Jacques, off the Seventy-third regiment H note volunteers, was befoevery captain, it is said, was also a Methodist preaches. Col Jacques was sent with his men to the Army of the Cumberland, where he fougme up in Tennessee, and in the arrangement of which we believe Col Jacques has been for some time engaged. The reporter who tells the story of Colonel Jacques's visit to Richmond assert that it was no respect official in its character, and that he had no warranty whatsoever tom these hints it is not difficult for those who have known of Col Jacques's efforts in Tennessee to guess what has been his object in visiti the reunion between Northern and Southern denominations which Col Jacques expected to bring about in Tennessee, with what success or effect thfulness to the Union and their opposition to slavery. We fear Col. Jacques will accomplish little of the purpose he has at heart. --But he
, where a heavy body of the enemy remained for a day or two, we have no intelligence of their operations other than that they destroyed the printing material of the Old Fellow newspaper, and took whatever property of a movable character they thought might be of use to them. In their course through the country they took wagons, horses, cattle, and sheep, without paying any respect to either friend or foe. A large steam distillery, about a mile and a half from Williamsport, belonging to Mrs Dahl, was fired by the rebels and consumed. The establishment had not been in operation for some time. From Grant's army. A letter, dated at Grant's headquarters on the 21st, says: Rebel deserters coming into our lines on Sunday night concurred in stating that preparations were being made by the enemy for a grand attack our lines yesterday morning, for some unknown reason the attack was not made, and the hopes of our brave boys were doomed to a disappointment. The intelligence
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