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Browsing named entities in Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.).

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e the Samian territory, and forms towards it, beyond the promontory Trogilium,Cape Santa Maria. a strait of above 7 stadia in width. Priene is called by some writers Cadme, because Philotus, its second founder, was a Bœotian. Bias, one of the seven wise men, was a native of Priene, of whom Hipponax uses this expression; More just in pleadings than Bias of Priene. In front of Trogilium lies an island of the same name. Thence, which is the nearest way, is a passage across to Sunium of 1600 stadia. At the commencement of the voyage, on the right hand are Samos, Icaria, and the Corsiæ islands;The Furni islands. on the left, the Melantian rocks.Stapodia. The remainder of the voyage lies through the middle of the Cyclades islands. The promontory Trogilium itself may be considered as a foot of the mountain Mycale. Close to Mycale is another mountain, the Pactyas, belonging to the Ephesian territory, where the Mesogis terminates. From Trogilium to Samos are 40 stadia. Both t
is of a triangular shape, at 2000 stadia; and the breadth of the river, where it is separated into two mouths, at about 200 stadia.This number is too large. There is probably an error in the text. Groskurd reads 20; but Kramer refers to Arrian's expedition of Alexander, v. 20, and suggests that we may here read 100 (r) instead of 200 (s). He calls the island Delta, and says that it is as large as the Delta of Egypt; but this is a mistake. For the Egyptian Delta is said to have a base of 1300 stadia, and each of the sides to be less than the base. In Patalene is Patala, a considerable city, from which the island has its name. Onesicritus says, that the greatest part of the coast in this quarter abounds with swamps, particularly at the mouths of the river, which is owing to the mud, the tides, and the want of land breezes; for these parts are chiefly under the influence of winds blowing from the sea. He expatiates also in praise of the country of Musicanus, and relates of
as Kramer proposes, the words kai\ po|o\s tou\s Pe/o|sas be introduced into the text. Strabo frequently mentions together the three successive governments of Persians, Macedonians, and Parthians. B. xi. c. xiii. § 4, and c. xiv. § 15. in the time of the Macedonians, who governed Syria. When Antiochus the Great attempted to plunder the temple of Belus, the neighbouring barbarians, unassisted, attacked and put him to death. In after-times the king of ParthiaMithridates I., son of Phraates, 163 B. C., and 124 years after the expedition of Antiochus. heard that the temples in their country contained great wealth, but knowing that the people would not submit, and admonished by the fate of Antiochus, he invaded their country with a large army; he took the temple of Minerva, and that of Diana, called Azara, and carried away treasure to the amount of 10,000 talents. Seleuceia also, a large city on the river Hedyphon,Probably the Djerrahi. was taken. It was formerly called So
ire. The Romans and the chiefs of the Arabian tribes occupy the parts on this side the Euphrates as far as Babylonia. Some of the chiefs attach themselves in preference to the Parthians, others to the Romans, to whom they adjoin. The Scenitæ nomades, who live near the river, are less friendly to the Romans than those tribes who are situated at a distance near Arabia Felix. The Parthians were once solicitous of conciliating the friendship of the Romans, but having repulsed Crassus,B. C. 54. who began the war with them, they suffered reprisals, when they themselves commenced hostilities, and sent Pacorus into Asia.The Parthians became masters of Syria under Pacorus, and of Asia Minor under Labienus. B. C. 38. But Antony, following the advice of the Armenian,Artavasdes, king of the Armenians. B. xi. c. xiii. § 4. was betrayed, and was unsuccessful (against them). Phraates, hisThe text would lead us to suppose that Phraates succeeded Pacorus, whereas below, § 8, Pacorus, the eld
called by the Macedonians Mygdones, occupy the parts towards the Euphrates, and both Zeugmata, that is, the Zeugma in Commagene, and the ancient Zeugma at Thapsacus. In their territory is Nisibis,Nisibin. which they called also Antioch in Mygdonia, situated below Mount Masius,Kara-dagh. and Tigranocerta,Sered. and the places about Carrhæ, Nicephorium,Haran. Chordiraza,Racca. and Sinnaca, where Crassus was taken prisoner by stratagem, and put to death by Surena, the Parthian general.B. C. 51. Near the Tigris are the places belonging to the Gordyæi,Gordyæa was the most northerly part of Assyria, or Kurdistan, near the lake Van. From Carduchi, the name of the inhabitants, is derived the modern name Kurds. whom the ancients called Carduchi; their cities are Sareisa, Satalca, and Pinaca, a very strong fortress with three citadels, each enclosed by its own wall, so that it is as it were a triple city. It was, however, subject to the king of Armenia; the Romans also took it by st
ey adjoin. The Scenitæ nomades, who live near the river, are less friendly to the Romans than those tribes who are situated at a distance near Arabia Felix. The Parthians were once solicitous of conciliating the friendship of the Romans, but having repulsed Crassus,B. C. 54. who began the war with them, they suffered reprisals, when they themselves commenced hostilities, and sent Pacorus into Asia.The Parthians became masters of Syria under Pacorus, and of Asia Minor under Labienus. B. C. 38. But Antony, following the advice of the Armenian,Artavasdes, king of the Armenians. B. xi. c. xiii. § 4. was betrayed, and was unsuccessful (against them). Phraates, hisThe text would lead us to suppose that Phraates succeeded Pacorus, whereas below, § 8, Pacorus, the eldest son of the Parthian king, died before his father, Orodes. Letronne, therefore, and Groskurd suppose that the words, the son of Orodes, are omitted after Pacorus above, and his in the translation would then refer to Orod
ter Egypt is difficult of access, i. e. from the eastern side towards Phœnicia and Judæa, and on the side of Arabia Nabatæa, which is contiguous; through which countries the road to Egypt lies. The country between the Nile and the Arabian Gulf is Arabia, and at its extremity is situated Pelusium. But the whole is desert, and not passable by an army. The isthmus between Pelusium and the recess of the Arabian Gulf near Heroopolis is 1000 stadia; but, according to Poseidonius, less than 1500 stadia in extent. Besides its being sandy and without water, it abounds with reptiles, which burrow in the sand. In sailing up the river from Schedia to Memphis,Memphis was the residence of the Pharaohs, who succeeded Psammitichus, B. C. 616. The Memphite Nome rose into importance on the decline of the kingdom of Thebais, and was itself in turn eclipsed by the Hellenic kingdom of Alexandria. The village of Mitranieh, half concealed in a grove of palm trees, about ten miles south of Giz
latitude of the places about Meroë. Then entering far into Africa, and having made another bend, it flows towards the north, a distance of 5300 stadia, to the great cataract;Genadil. and inclining a little to the east, traverses a distance of 1200 stadia to the smaller cataract at Syene,Assouan. and 5300 stadia more to the sea.Thus Eratosthenes calculated, in following the windings of the Nile, 12,900 stadia, which is 7900 stadia more than he calculated in a straight line, as he made thee) adopted by that geographer. According to this hypothesis, the distance in Strabo will be thus divided: Setting out from Meroë, the Nile runs, days. 1. 2700 stadia to the north12ċ8 2. 3700 to the S. and S. W.17ċ6 3. 5300 to the N. 1/4 E.25 4. 1200 to the N.5ċ7 61ċ1 which nearly corresponds with the account of Timosthenes. The number of days corresponds tolerably well with the distance given by the explorers sent by Nero for the discovery of Meroë: they reported the distance to be 873 miles
ebira or Marsa Sollom. to Parætonium is a run of 900 stadia for a vessel in a direct course. There is a city and a large harbour of about 40 stadia in extent, by some called the city Parætonium,Baretoun, or Berek-Marsa. Alexander, after passing 1600 stadia through that part of the desert where water was to be found to Parætonium, then turned inland to visit the oracle of Ammon. Arrian, b. iii. § 3 by others, Ammonia. Between these is the village of the Egyptians, and the promontory Ænesisphtificial construction, but was inferior to it in size, the sides of the base being a stadium each in length. On the greater pyramid is an inscription which states the amount expended on herbs and radishes for the workmen, and it informs us that 1600 talents were paid for this purpose. The lesser pyramid bears no inscription, and it has an ascent formed in it through an opening in one of the sides. But although the kings built these pyramids for their own tombs, yet it has so happened that
000 stadia, which he had calculated in a straight line for the same interval, he imagined this great difference arose from the excessive winding course of the Nile; consequently he supposed the Nile to change frequently the direction of its course. This opinion had its influence in the construction of Ptolemy's map, which presents to us nearly all the inflexions which Eratosthenes imagined; in calculating the intervals of positions assigned by Ptolemy along the river, we find a total of 1260 minutes; and adding about 1/6 for the small windings, we have a total of 1470 minutes, which are equal to 12,400 stadia of the module (700 to the degree) adopted by that geographer. According to this hypothesis, the distance in Strabo will be thus divided: Setting out from Meroë, the Nile runs, days. 1. 2700 stadia to the north12ċ8 2. 3700 to the S. and S. W.17ċ6 3. 5300 to the N. 1/4 E.25 4. 1200 to the N.5ċ7 61ċ1 which nearly corresponds with the account of Timosthenes. The number of
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