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en, Foote, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, King, Seward, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson. NAYs, Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Clingman, Crittenden, Fitch, Green, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane of Oregon, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Saulsbury, and Sebastian. The leading conspirators in the Senate, who might have defeated the amendment and carried the Crittenden Compromise, did not vote. This reticence was preconcmorning, March 3, 1861. the Crittenden Compromise was finally rejected by a vote of twenty against nineteen. The vote was as follows:-- ayes.--Messrs. Bayard, Bright, Bigler, Crittenden, Douglas, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane, Latham, Mason, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Thompson, Wigfall--19. noes.--Messrs. Anthony, Bingham, Chandler, Clarke, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkie, Fessenden, Foote, Foster, Grimes, Harlan, King. Morrill, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull. W
R. M. T. Hunter (search for this): chapter 9
ropositions Toombs declares himself a rebel, 224. Hunter's propositions, 225. Seward's position defined Un a provisional government. The plan is to make Senator Hunter, of Virginia, Provisional President, and Jeffer Davis Commander-in-chief of the Army of Defense. Mr. Hunter possesses, in a more eminent degree, the philosop, Bright, Clingman, Crittenden, Fitch, Green, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane of Oregon, Masby two of the ablest members of that House, namely, Hunter of Virginia, and Seward of New York. Their speecheguage, but irreconcilable opposition of sentiment. Hunter's foreshadowed the aims and determination of the coion, of which he was to be the Prime Minister. Mr. Hunter was one of the most polished, subtle, and dangerorance, and conciliation. The speeches of Toombs, Hunter, and Seward were key-notes to all that. succeeded Bayard, Bright, Bigler, Crittenden, Douglas, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane, Latham, Mason
Benjamin F. Wade (search for this): chapter 9
m, Cameron, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkee, Fessenden, Foote, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, King, Seward, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson. NAYs, Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Clingman, Crittenden, Fitch, Green, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane of Oreg great Civil War, as exponents of the conflicting views entertained concerning the Government, its character, and its power. Charles Sumner, Henry Wilson, Benjamin F. Wade, and others in the Senate; and John Sherman, Charles Francis Adams, Thomas Corwin, and others in the House of Representatives, made powerful speeches againstnoes.--Messrs. Anthony, Bingham, Chandler, Clarke, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkie, Fessenden, Foote, Foster, Grimes, Harlan, King. Morrill, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull. Wade, Wilkinson, Wilson--20. It might have been carried had the conspirators retained their seats. The question was then taken in the Senate on a resolution of the Hou
Thomas Corwin (search for this): chapter 9
y, notwithstanding great concessions were offered. These concessions were embodied in an elaborate report submitted by Mr. Corwin, January 14, 1861. the Chairman of the Committee. It condemned legislative interference with the Fugitive Slave Law. the Governors of the States, asking them to lay it before their respective Legislatures. In addition to this report, Mr. Corwin submitted a joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution, whereby any further amendment, giving Congressvention of the States to amend the Constitution. A proposition was also made to substitute the Crittenden Compromise for Corwin's report. Albert Rust, of Arkansas, offered in the Senate a proposition, substantially the same as Crittenden's, as the Charles Sumner, Henry Wilson, Benjamin F. Wade, and others in the Senate; and John Sherman, Charles Francis Adams, Thomas Corwin, and others in the House of Representatives, made powerful speeches against Mr. Crittenden's propositions, and in fav
E. H. Baker (search for this): chapter 9
t, so thoroughly wise and patriotic, and so eminently necessary at that critical moment in averting the most appalling national danger, was adopted by a vote of twenty-five against twenty-three. The vote was as follows:--yeas, Messrs. Anthony, Baker, Bingham, Cameron, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkee, Fessenden, Foote, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, King, Seward, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson. NAYs, Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, our last libation, and swear by our God, by all that is sacred and holy, that the Constitution shall be saved and the Union preserved. From this lofty attitude of patriotism he never stooped a line during the fierce struggle that ensued. Senator Baker, of Oregon, who attested his devotion to his country by giving his life in its defense on the battle-field a few months later, October 21, 1861. made a most eloquent appeal for the preservation of the Union. January 12. He and others had be
y, Baker, Bingham, Cameron, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkee, Fessenden, Foote, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, King, Seward, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson. NAYs, Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Clingman, Crittenden, Fitch, Green, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane of Oregon, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Saulsbury, and Sebastian. The leading conspirators in the Senate, who might have defeated the amsition. After a long debate, continuing until late in the small hours of Sunday morning, March 3, 1861. the Crittenden Compromise was finally rejected by a vote of twenty against nineteen. The vote was as follows:-- ayes.--Messrs. Bayard, Bright, Bigler, Crittenden, Douglas, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane, Latham, Mason, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Thompson, Wigfall--19. noes.--Messrs. Anthony, Bingham, Chandler, Clarke, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkie, Fessend
Leonidas Polk (search for this): chapter 9
ing, Seward, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson. NAYs, Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Clingman, Crittenden, Fitch, Green, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane of Oregon, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Saulsbury, and Sebastian. The leading conspirators in the Senate, who might have defeated the amendment and carried the Crittenden Compromise, did not vote. This reticence was preconcerted. They had resolved not to accept anttenden Compromise was finally rejected by a vote of twenty against nineteen. The vote was as follows:-- ayes.--Messrs. Bayard, Bright, Bigler, Crittenden, Douglas, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane, Latham, Mason, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Thompson, Wigfall--19. noes.--Messrs. Anthony, Bingham, Chandler, Clarke, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkie, Fessenden, Foote, Foster, Grimes, Harlan, King. Morrill, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull. Wade, Wilkinson, Wilson--20. It m
Alfred Iverson (search for this): chapter 9
(naming them These were, Benjamin Fitzpatrick and Clement C. Clay, Jr., of Alabama; R. W. Johnson and William K. Sebastian, of Arkansas; Robert Toombs and Alfred Iverson, of Georgia; Judah P. Benjamin and John Slidell, of Louisiana; Jefferson Davis and Albert G. Brown, of Mississippi; John Hemphill and Lewis T. Wigfall, of Tex her fate and maintain her fortunes. His white-haired colleague, Fitzpatrick, indorsed his sentiments, and both withdrew. A week later, January 28, 1861. Senator Iverson, of Georgia, having received a copy of the Ordinance of Secession from the Convention of the politicians of his State, formally withdrew, when he took the occons will not have something to say and something to do on that subject. Cotton is King! and it will find means to raise your blockade and disperse your ships. Iverson prudently kept himself away from all personal danger during the war that ensued; and in less than a year he saw his overrated monarch dethroned, and heard the cry
Saulsbury (search for this): chapter 9
vote of twenty-five against twenty-three. The vote was as follows:--yeas, Messrs. Anthony, Baker, Bingham, Cameron, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkee, Fessenden, Foote, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, King, Seward, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson. NAYs, Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Clingman, Crittenden, Fitch, Green, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane of Oregon, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Saulsbury, and Sebastian. The leading conspirators in the Senate, who might have defeated the amendment and carried the Crittenden Compromise, did not vote. This reticence was preconcerted. They had resolved not to accept any terms of adjustment. They were bent on disunion, and acted consistently. See notice of The 1860 Association, on page 95. In the Senate Committee of Thirteen, which was composed of five Republicans and eight opposed to them, Mr. Crittenden's proposition to restore the
John Ellis Wool (search for this): chapter 9
ss, 216. the conspiracy revealed by a Southern man, 217. the people alarmed Unsatisfactory Message from President Buchanan, 218. position of the President General Wool's warning firmness of the Union men in Congress, 219. Jefferson Davis's proposition to amend the Constitution, 220. useless labors of the two great committen. He did not ask Congress for any more power, nor did he give a word of encouragement to the loyal people that he would heed the warning voice of the veteran General Wool, and others, who implored the Government not to yield Fort Sumter to the insurgents, and thereby cause the kindling of a civil war. So long as the United States keep possession of that fort, said Wool, the independence of South Carolina will only be in name, and not in fact. Then, with prophetic words, whose predictions were fulfilled a few weeks later, he said:--If, however, it should be surrendered to South Carolina, the smothered indignation of the Free States would be roused beyond
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