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February 8th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 15
te wounded. gallantry of Captain Walke. losses. General Grant's victory. results. gunboats repair to Cairo. Grant prepares to advance towards Shiloh. battle at Pittsburg Landing (Shiloh). services rendered by the gun-boats Lexington and Taylor. Captain Gwin's report. the Navy aids materially in saving the Army from destruction. a terrible battle and great loss of life. the Confederates as fighters. extracts from records of the times. congratulatory orders, &C. On the 8th of February, 1862, Gen. Grant telegraphed to Gen. Halleck: Fort Henry is ours; the gunboats silenced the batteries before the investment was completed. I shall take and destroy Fort Donelson on the 8th. and return to Fort Henry. The same reasons which had induced Grant to undertake the capture of Fort Henry still urged him to take Fort Donelson; that is, to get the control of the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers and be able to penetrate into the heart of Tennessee with his troops and Foote's gun-bo
t. as the most appropriate way of giving thanks to God, the only Giver of victory, and under such circumstances it makes a very happy impression on all sincere hearts. The Carondelet had had two 32 or 42-pounder shot in her bow between wind and water, and leaked badly; her hull and her crew being more cut up and disabled than any other gun-boat of the squadron. As General Grant could then dispense with her services, she returned to Cairo for repairs. Arriving there on the morning of the 17th, Commander Walke reported to the flag-officer the success of our arms, and the surrender of Fort Donelson to General Grant. Flag-officer Foote immediately issued the following Congratulatory orderFebruary 17th, 1862. Flag-officer Foote, the Commander-in-chief of the Naval Forces on the Western waters, while he congratulates the survivors of the distinguished gun-boat, Carondelet in the several actions so bravely fought, sympathizes with the wounded who have gloriously periled their
February 17th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 15
hot in her bow between wind and water, and leaked badly; her hull and her crew being more cut up and disabled than any other gun-boat of the squadron. As General Grant could then dispense with her services, she returned to Cairo for repairs. Arriving there on the morning of the 17th, Commander Walke reported to the flag-officer the success of our arms, and the surrender of Fort Donelson to General Grant. Flag-officer Foote immediately issued the following Congratulatory orderFebruary 17th, 1862. Flag-officer Foote, the Commander-in-chief of the Naval Forces on the Western waters, while he congratulates the survivors of the distinguished gun-boat, Carondelet in the several actions so bravely fought, sympathizes with the wounded who have gloriously periled their lives in honor of the Union and the dear old flag. He also sympathizes with the friends of those gallant dead, who could not have died in a more glorious cause. Let us thank God from the heart, and say, Not unto u
. While Grant was making his movements in the rear of the fort, so as to completely surround it and prevent the escape of any of the garrison, the gun-boats on the water side were preparing for the attack. Foote, according to his own report, did not consider himself properly prepared for such an adventure, as his force was not sufficiently strong to make an attack on the fort; but at the earnest request of Halleck and Grant, he felt called upon to do what he could, and at 3 P. M. on the 14th, he moved up with his fleet in the following order: iron-clads, St. Louis, (flag-ship), Lieut. Paulding; Carondelet, Corn. Walke; Louisville, Com. Dove; Pittsburg, Lieut. E. Thompson; gun-boats: Taylor, Lieut.-Com. Gwin; Conestoga, Lieut.-Com. Phelps, the two latter in the rear. After a severe fight of an hour and a half, during part of which time the iron-clads were within 400 yards of the fort, the flagship St. Louis, and the iron-clad Louisville, had their wheels disabled and drifted o
port of Commander Walke to Admiral Foote. U. S. Gun-Boat Carondelet, Near Fort Donelson, Cumberland River, Feb. 15th. Sir:--I arrived here (towed by the Alps) on the 12th instant, about 11:20 A. M., and seeing or hearing nothing of our Army, I threw a few shell into Fort Donelson, to announce my arrival to General Grant, as he had previously requested. I then dropped down the river a few miles, and anchored for the night, awaiting General Grant's arrival. On the morning of the thirteenth, I weighed anchor, and came again to this place, where I received a dispatch from General Grant, informing me that he had arrived the day before, and had succeeded in getting in position, almost entirely investing the enemy's works. Most of our batteries, (he writes) are established, and the remainder soon will be. If you will advance with your gun-boat at 10 o'clock in the morning, we will be ready to take advantage of any diversion in our favor. I immediately complied with these i
ad the honor of commencing the attack on Fort Donelson; having arrived before the fort two days in advance of the other gun-boats, she fired upon the enemy's works on the morning of February 12th; and also, at the request of General Grant, made a diversion in his favor on February 13th, as narrated in the following report of Commander Walke to Admiral Foote. U. S. Gun-Boat Carondelet, Near Fort Donelson, Cumberland River, Feb. 15th. Sir:--I arrived here (towed by the Alps) on the 12th instant, about 11:20 A. M., and seeing or hearing nothing of our Army, I threw a few shell into Fort Donelson, to announce my arrival to General Grant, as he had previously requested. I then dropped down the river a few miles, and anchored for the night, awaiting General Grant's arrival. On the morning of the thirteenth, I weighed anchor, and came again to this place, where I received a dispatch from General Grant, informing me that he had arrived the day before, and had succeeded in getting
such support to induce them to proclaim their sentiments openly. Grant lost no time in getting together a force which he deemed sufficient for the attack on Fort Donelson. Reinforcements were rapidly coming in from various quarters, and Halleck, who up to this time had thrown every objection in the way of the expedition, now seemed anxious to take the credit of the movement to himself, and was doing all he could to hurry troops, stores and siege implements to the scene of action. On the 10th he informed Grant that large re-enforcements would be sent to him. Grant did not, however, wait for these re-enforcements, but while Halleck was writing about picks and shovels he informed Foote that he was only waiting for the return of the gun-boats to attack Fort Donelson. This fortification was the strongest military work in the entire theatre of war. It was situated on the west bank of the Cumberland River, north of the town of Dover, on a peculiarly rugged and inaccessible series
services rendered by the gun-boats Lexington and Taylor. Captain Gwin's report. the Navy aids materially in saving the Army from destruction. a terrible battle and great loss of life. the Confederates as fighters. extracts from records of the times. congratulatory orders, &C. On the 8th of February, 1862, Gen. Grant telegraphed to Gen. Halleck: Fort Henry is ours; the gunboats silenced the batteries before the investment was completed. I shall take and destroy Fort Donelson on the 8th. and return to Fort Henry. The same reasons which had induced Grant to undertake the capture of Fort Henry still urged him to take Fort Donelson; that is, to get the control of the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers and be able to penetrate into the heart of Tennessee with his troops and Foote's gun-boats. On the 7th of February his cavalry penetrated to within a mile of Fort Donelson, but they could obtain no information as to the strength of the place or the number of troops. Foote w
February 15th (search for this): chapter 15
ssippi, a point in Tennessee near Pittsburg, and the town of Chattanooga. All of these points were strongly fortified and defended by large armies, thus closing up East Tennessee, and preventing our armies from marching southward. On the 15th of February, Gen. Grant was assigned to the new military district of West Tennessee, with limits undefined, and Gen. W. T. Sherman to the command of the district of Cairo. Grant commenced at once to concentrate his forces and make his dispositions toary 12th; and also, at the request of General Grant, made a diversion in his favor on February 13th, as narrated in the following report of Commander Walke to Admiral Foote. U. S. Gun-Boat Carondelet, Near Fort Donelson, Cumberland River, Feb. 15th. Sir:--I arrived here (towed by the Alps) on the 12th instant, about 11:20 A. M., and seeing or hearing nothing of our Army, I threw a few shell into Fort Donelson, to announce my arrival to General Grant, as he had previously requested. I
ke either version of the story that suits him best. There is a tradition in the Navy which will go down to posterity, that the Taylor and Lexington prevented part of our Army on that day from being driven into the river, and turned the enemy back when he considered that victory was in his hands. Lieut. Gwin in writing to Foote, puts it Rear-Admiral Henry Walke, (Commander of the Carondelet.) modestly thus: Your old wooden boats, I feel confident, rendered invaluable service on the 6th instant to the land forces. And so will think the reader. Why Gen. Grant did not have a large number of gun-boats at Pittsburg Landing is not understood. as it was a most favorable position for their use, and the 60,000 Confederates spread over a large area of ground would have offered many opportunities for them to throw in an effective fire. The battle of Shiloh was a terrible one, and the losses on both sides were very great (12,000 each). The victory was claimed by both parties, but t
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