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aski, Tenn., having ascertained that a force of rebel cavalry under Roddy, was constructing flat-boats, and hiding them in Little Bear Creek, Spring Creek, and Town Creek, and also that one of Roddy's regiments was foraging on the north side of the Tennessee River, he immediately i me to organize an expedition at once, of sufficient force to drive Roddy away from where he was reported to be, and to destroy all boats and, information was received that Johnson's and Morrow's brigades, of Roddy's command, had crossed the Tennessee, somewhere between Florence anttack from this party, and measures were immediately taken to drive Roddy across the river. Colonel H. O. Miller, Seventy-second Indiana, coinely mounted. A scout also brought me information of an attack by Roddy, with a heavy force, upon our troops stationed at Lebanon, De Kalb ulsed, and driven in confusion towards Gadsden, when, learning that Roddy was being reenforced by Wheeler, our troops withdrew to Sand Mounta
Frank Hanson (search for this): chapter 36
rd and Crufts found the enemy east of the ridge in heavy force and very strongly posted, skirmishing heavily with him until nightfall, when both divisions were withdrawn, ascertaining before leaving, that the enemy was in much stronger force than was supposed, and that, in consequence of late movements on our part, he had been obliged to order back to Dalton the reenforcements he had sent to relieve Polk in Alabama. Cleburne's division (one of those reported to have gone south) attacked Colonel Hanson's mounted infantry command at daylight on the morning of the twenty-sixth, and forced him to retire from the gap. Being convinced that the rebel army at Dalton largely outnumbered the strength of the four divisions I had opposed to it, and the movement against Johnston being a complete success insomuch as it caused the recalling of reenforcements sent to oppose General Sherman's expedition against Meridian, I concluded to withdraw my troops to the position they had occupied previous to t
from Blue Springs, near Cleveland, to Red Clay; Long's brigade of cavalry cooperated with Crufts's column, Long's instructions being to establish communication with Crufts at Red Clay, and then push od to reinforce General Crufts, at Red Clay; Colonel Long, having established communication with Crufn's men leading the advance toward Tunnel Hill; Long's brigade of cavalry at Varnell's Station, on tuctions to move, in conjunction with Crufts and Long's cavalry, down the eastern side of Rock Face Rot-guard to protect his supplies at Cleveland. Long's brigade of cavalry ordered to take post at Clup the positions indicated above. Crufts's and Long's cavalry also fell back to Catoosa Platform on report of casualties; also the report of Colonel Eli Long, commanding Second brigade, Second divisi Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Eli long, Col. Commanding Second Brigade, Second Divi Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Eli long, Col. Commanding Second Brigade, Second Divi
tions being to establish communication with Crufts at Red Clay, and then push on as far as possible toward Dalton on the Spring Place road, observing well the movements of the enemy, so as to give timely warning of any attempt to turn Crufts's left flank; and should the enemy retire, to notify Crufts, so that the latter might advance from Red Clay. During the evening of the twenty-second, General Palmer notified me from Ringgold that he had reliable information that Johnston had despatched Cheatham's and Cleburne's divisions to the relief of Polk, in Alabama, who was falling back before General Sherman's column. On the twenty-third, Davis's division of the Fourteenth corps, closed up on the balance of General Palmer's command at Ringgold; Brigadier-General Matthias, commanding a brigade of the Fifteenth corps, stationed at Cleveland, in reserve, was directed to send six regiments from his command to reinforce General Crufts, at Red Clay; Colonel Long, having established communicati
D. T. Carter (search for this): chapter 36
ng about one hundred and fifty men, attacked Tracy City on the twentieth, and after having three times summoned the garrison to surrender, were handsomely repulsed by our forces. Colonel T. J. Harrison, Thirty-ninth Indiana, (mounted infantry,) reports from Cedar Grove, twenty-first instant, that he had sent an expedition of two hundred men to Sparta, to look after the guerrillas in that vicinity. They divided into five parties, concentrating at Sparta, having passed over the localities of Carter's, Champ Ferguson's, Bledsoe's, and Murray's guerrillas. His (Harrison's) force remained on the Calf-Killer five days, and during that time killed four, (4,) wounded five or six, and captured fifteen, (15,) including a captain and lieutenant, thirty (30) horses, and twenty stand of arms. The Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, having been completed on the fourteenth instant, and trains running regularly from Nashville to this point, steps were immediately taken to commence repairing the
T. J. Harrison (search for this): chapter 36
urrender, were handsomely repulsed by our forces. Colonel T. J. Harrison, Thirty-ninth Indiana, (mounted infantry,) reportsamp Ferguson's, Bledsoe's, and Murray's guerrillas. His (Harrison's) force remained on the Calf-Killer five days, and durininfantry, Colonel Boone's Twenty-eighth Kentucky, and Colonel Harrison's Thirty-ninth Indiana, on the east side of the creekivisions in advance, toward Tunnel Hill, with Boone's and Harrison's regiments of mounted infantry, the former on the left, and Harrison's men leading the advance toward Tunnel Hill; Long's brigade of cavalry at Varnell's Station, on the Cleveland ted by Johnson, attacked him in front. In the mean time, Harrison's regiment of mounted infantry (Thirty-ninth Indiana) occat Cleveland, and keep the left flank well patroled. Colonel Harrison, commanding Thirty-ninth Indiana mounted infantry, withe twenty-sixth to Catoosa Platform, Davis and Baird and Harrison to Ringgold; and on the twenty-seventh they all took up t
J. H. Enson (search for this): chapter 36
ny L, Cornelius Mulchaha, privates, company B, David Hatcher, private, company L, wounded. Fourth Ohio Cavalry.--John Tuelling, private, company C, Alexander Bernhardt, private, company K, wounded. Fourth Michigan Cavalry.--Sergeant David Donahoe, company D, private John Caul, company D, private George Rise, company C, private William Heistine, company B, wounded. Ninety-eighth Illinois Mounted Infantry.--Sergeant H. O. Wilkins, company D, Sergeant B. F. Blackford, company H, private J. H. Enson, company B, private J. B. Shaw, company D, private J. M. Walker, company H, private James Stackwell, company I, private Abram Barnes, company K, wounded; private William H. Hope, company E, private A. M. Anderson, company E, missing. Total.--Two killed, nineteen wounded two missing. I had no means of ascertaining the injury done the enemy; but it was reported that eight bodies were left on the field. I took twenty-three prisoners. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, El
B. F. Blackford (search for this): chapter 36
, company C, Sylvester Stump, company L, Cornelius Mulchaha, privates, company B, David Hatcher, private, company L, wounded. Fourth Ohio Cavalry.--John Tuelling, private, company C, Alexander Bernhardt, private, company K, wounded. Fourth Michigan Cavalry.--Sergeant David Donahoe, company D, private John Caul, company D, private George Rise, company C, private William Heistine, company B, wounded. Ninety-eighth Illinois Mounted Infantry.--Sergeant H. O. Wilkins, company D, Sergeant B. F. Blackford, company H, private J. H. Enson, company B, private J. B. Shaw, company D, private J. M. Walker, company H, private James Stackwell, company I, private Abram Barnes, company K, wounded; private William H. Hope, company E, private A. M. Anderson, company E, missing. Total.--Two killed, nineteen wounded two missing. I had no means of ascertaining the injury done the enemy; but it was reported that eight bodies were left on the field. I took twenty-three prisoners. Very respe
George H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 36
ttery C First Illinois, forty-eight men battery F Fourth United States artillery, fifty-two men battery K Fifth United States artillery, forty-one men Ninth Ohio Independent, eighty-five men First Michigan engineers, eighty-four men First Missouri engineers. Recapitulation: Fifty-two regiments infantry, two regiments of mounted infantry, eight regiments of cavalry, eleven batteries of artillery, and twenty-four detachments. I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, George H. Thomas, Major-General United States Volunteers, Commanding. table of killed and wounded in the Fourth, Fourteenth, and cavalry corps, army of the Cumberland, at the battle of Buzzard's Roost, near Dalton, Ga., on the twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth days of February, 1864: Fourth army corps. Killed: 2 non-commissioned officers, 3 privates; total, 5. Wounded: 1 commissioned officer, 13 non-commissioned officers, 38 privates; total, 52.--Fourteenth army corps. Killed: 3 non-commissioned o
Patrick Carlin (search for this): chapter 36
h of that as possible. In accordance with the above instructions, every thing being in readiness, Johnson's and Baird's divisions moved out from Chattanooga, and occupied Ringgold, Georgia, on the twenty-second, taking up a position on the ridge west of East-Chickamauga Creek, with two regiments of mounted infantry, Colonel Boone's Twenty-eighth Kentucky, and Colonel Harrison's Thirty-ninth Indiana, on the east side of the creek; the former on the right flank, and the latter on the left. Carlin's brigade, of Johnson's division, was stationed about midway between the main line and Taylor's Ridge. Crufts's division, of the Fourth corps, moved on the twenty-second from Blue Springs, near Cleveland, to Red Clay; Long's brigade of cavalry cooperated with Crufts's column, Long's instructions being to establish communication with Crufts at Red Clay, and then push on as far as possible toward Dalton on the Spring Place road, observing well the movements of the enemy, so as to give timel
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