hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 214 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 174 2 Browse Search
Andersonville, Ga. (Georgia, United States) 106 0 Browse Search
James Grant 84 0 Browse Search
City Point (Virginia, United States) 60 0 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 59 5 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 56 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 56 0 Browse Search
Robert Ould 50 6 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 43 7 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

Found 157 total hits in 74 results.

... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
hern keep. Port Warren. 1864 Nine of the prisoners in this photograph were officers of the Confederate States ironclad Atlanta, captured at Savannah, June 17, 1863: (1) Master T. L. Wragg, (3) Gunner T. B. Travers, (4) First Assistant Engineer Morrill, (5) Second Assistant Engineer L. G. King, (6) Master Mate J. B. Beville, (7) Pilot Hernandez, (8) Midshipman Peters, (12) Third Assistant Engineer J. S. West, (13) Master Alldridge. The others were: (2) Lieutenant Moses, C. S. A., (9) Captain Underwood, C. S. A., (10) Major Boland, C. S. A., (11) Second Assistant E. H. Browne, (14) Master Mate John Billups of the privateer Tacony, and (15) Captain Sanders, C. S. A. To go into a prison of war is in all respects to be born over. And so in this far little world, which was as much separated from the outer world as if it had been in the outer confines of space, it was striking to see how society immediately resolved itself into those three estates invariably constituted elsewhere.
C. E. Inloes (search for this): chapter 1.5
a Supreme Court. Others well known later as citizens of their home communities and of the United States, can be picked out from the complete roster from left to right as it was written on the photograph: J. F. Stone, First Maryland Cavalry; H. C. Florance, First W. Artillery; D. Kilpatrick, First W. Artillery; William Byrne, Cit. Maryland; D. W. Slye, Cit. Maryland; Van Vinson, First W. Artillery; J. Black, Louisiana Guard; F. F. Case, First W. Artillery; G. W. Dupre, First W. Artillery; C. E. Inloes, First Maryland Cavalry; Edwin Harris, Company H., Seventh Louisiana; W. D. DuBarry, Twenty-seventh South Carolina; H. L. Allan, First W. Artillery; G. R. Cooke, First Maryland Cavalry; J. Bozant, First W. Artillery; C. Rossiter, First W. Artillery, and S. M. E. Clark, First W. Artillery (abbreviation for Washington Artillery). hard the stories of the attitude of some of the prisoners toward their companions are revolting. In Andersonville and Salisbury, organized bands preyed upon the
who became mayor pro tem. of New Orleans, and G. W. Dupre (tenth), later clerk of the Louisiana Supreme Court. Others well known later as citizens of their home communities and of the United States, can be picked out from the complete roster from left to right as it was written on the photograph: J. F. Stone, First Maryland Cavalry; H. C. Florance, First W. Artillery; D. Kilpatrick, First W. Artillery; William Byrne, Cit. Maryland; D. W. Slye, Cit. Maryland; Van Vinson, First W. Artillery; J. Black, Louisiana Guard; F. F. Case, First W. Artillery; G. W. Dupre, First W. Artillery; C. E. Inloes, First Maryland Cavalry; Edwin Harris, Company H., Seventh Louisiana; W. D. DuBarry, Twenty-seventh South Carolina; H. L. Allan, First W. Artillery; G. R. Cooke, First Maryland Cavalry; J. Bozant, First W. Artillery; C. Rossiter, First W. Artillery, and S. M. E. Clark, First W. Artillery (abbreviation for Washington Artillery). hard the stories of the attitude of some of the prisoners toward the
The life of the captured Holland Thompson Confederates in a Northern keep. Port Warren. 1864 Nine of the prisoners in this photograph were officers of the Confederate States ironclad Atlanta, captured at Savannah, June 17, 1863: (1) Master T. L. Wragg, (3) Gunner T. B. Travers, (4) First Assistant Engineer Morrill, (5) Second Assistant Engineer L. G. King, (6) Master Mate J. B. Beville, (7) Pilot Hernandez, (8) Midshipman Peters, (12) Third Assistant Engineer J. S. West, (13) Master Alldridge. The others were: (2) Lieutenant Moses, C. S. A., (9) Captain Underwood, C. S. A., (10) Major Boland, C. S. A., (11) Second Assistant E. H. Browne, (14) Master Mate John Billups of the privateer Tacony, and (15) Captain Sanders, C. S. A. To go into a prison of war is in all respects to be born over. And so in this far little world, which was as much separated from the outer world as if it had been in the outer confines of space, it was striking to see how society immediately r
Les Miserables (search for this): chapter 1.5
ecame helpless. On the other hand, those who had been rated indifferent or ordinary showed unexpected treasures of strength and resourcefulness, cheering their despondent comrades, and preventing them from giving up the fight. The veneer of convention often peeled away, showing the real man beneath, sometimes attractive, sometimes unpleasant. Men who were confined for any length of time stood naked, stripped of all disguise, before their fellows. Where conditions were particularly Les Miserables de City Point—Confederates facing their second fight, 1865 The above caption written on this photograph by a Confederate prisoner's hand speaks eloquently for itself. This was the only Federal prison without any barracks. Only tents stood upon the low, narrow sand-spit. Prisoners were sent here from the West for exchange at City Point; at times as many as twenty thousand were crowded within the limits of the stockade. But from the faded photograph on this page there is reflected t
Edwin Harris (search for this): chapter 1.5
ter as citizens of their home communities and of the United States, can be picked out from the complete roster from left to right as it was written on the photograph: J. F. Stone, First Maryland Cavalry; H. C. Florance, First W. Artillery; D. Kilpatrick, First W. Artillery; William Byrne, Cit. Maryland; D. W. Slye, Cit. Maryland; Van Vinson, First W. Artillery; J. Black, Louisiana Guard; F. F. Case, First W. Artillery; G. W. Dupre, First W. Artillery; C. E. Inloes, First Maryland Cavalry; Edwin Harris, Company H., Seventh Louisiana; W. D. DuBarry, Twenty-seventh South Carolina; H. L. Allan, First W. Artillery; G. R. Cooke, First Maryland Cavalry; J. Bozant, First W. Artillery; C. Rossiter, First W. Artillery, and S. M. E. Clark, First W. Artillery (abbreviation for Washington Artillery). hard the stories of the attitude of some of the prisoners toward their companions are revolting. In Andersonville and Salisbury, organized bands preyed upon the weak or upon those who had managed to
C. Rossiter (search for this): chapter 1.5
nd Cavalry; H. C. Florance, First W. Artillery; D. Kilpatrick, First W. Artillery; William Byrne, Cit. Maryland; D. W. Slye, Cit. Maryland; Van Vinson, First W. Artillery; J. Black, Louisiana Guard; F. F. Case, First W. Artillery; G. W. Dupre, First W. Artillery; C. E. Inloes, First Maryland Cavalry; Edwin Harris, Company H., Seventh Louisiana; W. D. DuBarry, Twenty-seventh South Carolina; H. L. Allan, First W. Artillery; G. R. Cooke, First Maryland Cavalry; J. Bozant, First W. Artillery; C. Rossiter, First W. Artillery, and S. M. E. Clark, First W. Artillery (abbreviation for Washington Artillery). hard the stories of the attitude of some of the prisoners toward their companions are revolting. In Andersonville and Salisbury, organized bands preyed upon the weak or upon those who had managed to retain, or to obtain, some desired necessity or luxury. The possession of a little money, a camp-kettle, a blanket, or an overcoat was sometimes the occasion for jealousy and covetousness wh
C. W. Ringgold (search for this): chapter 1.5
Northern atmosphere somewhat uncongenial, but his companions are evidently at ease. Not every man is a Mark Tapley who can keep cheerful under creditable circumstances. But where the prisoners were men of some mentality they adopted many plans to mitigate the monotony. The Confederate officers at Johnson's Island had debating societies, classes in French, dancing, and music, and a miniature government. From left to right the men standing, exclusive of the two corporals on guard, are C. W. Ringgold, F. U. Benneau, S. DeForrest, J. T. Hespin, J. P. Hambleton, and M. A. Hardin; and the four men seated are J. E. Frescott, N. C. Trobridge, Major S. Cabot, and R. D. Crittenden. vigilance of the prison guard. Some prisoners were often cold and hungry because of their flirtation with the goddess of chance. To many of the prisoners with a limited outlook on life, some excitement was a necessary stimulus, and this was most easily obtained by a game of chance or, if facilities for a game
C. E. Chichester (search for this): chapter 1.5
hours, but others found such indulgence impossible and were forced to seek other methods of enduring the tiresome days. The nervous, mercurial men devised games, laying out checker-or chess-boards on pieces of plank of which they somehow managed to get possession. These boards were never idle, South Carolinians and New Yorkers: a meeting that was as agreeable as possible The two facing sentries formally parleying upon the parapet belong to the Charleston Zouave Cadets, under Captain C. E. Chichester. Below them, past the flag fluttering to the left of the picture, are the prisoners taken at the first battle of Bull Run, July 21, 1861, and placed under their care in Castle Pinckney. The meeting was as agreeable as possible under the circumstances, to all parties concerned. The prisoners, chiefly from New York regiments, behaved themselves like gentlemen and kept their quarters clean. The Cadets treated them as such, and picked up a few useful hints, such as the method of sof
J. F. Stone (search for this): chapter 1.5
How well they fought, how gallantly they conquered in that new and more arduous struggle, the following half-century witnessed. On this page is represented David Kilpatrick (third from left), who became mayor pro tem. of New Orleans, and G. W. Dupre (tenth), later clerk of the Louisiana Supreme Court. Others well known later as citizens of their home communities and of the United States, can be picked out from the complete roster from left to right as it was written on the photograph: J. F. Stone, First Maryland Cavalry; H. C. Florance, First W. Artillery; D. Kilpatrick, First W. Artillery; William Byrne, Cit. Maryland; D. W. Slye, Cit. Maryland; Van Vinson, First W. Artillery; J. Black, Louisiana Guard; F. F. Case, First W. Artillery; G. W. Dupre, First W. Artillery; C. E. Inloes, First Maryland Cavalry; Edwin Harris, Company H., Seventh Louisiana; W. D. DuBarry, Twenty-seventh South Carolina; H. L. Allan, First W. Artillery; G. R. Cooke, First Maryland Cavalry; J. Bozant, First
... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8