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s one of the salient features of the Memoirs. General Rosecrans particularly distinguished himself in the battles of Iuka and Corinth, in the autumn following the first occupation of the latter place. From General Sherman's account, however, the reader would suppose that General Rosecrans had behaved badly in both these actions. Of the battle at Iuka, he says: In the early part of September the enemy in our front manifested great activity, feeling with cavalry at all points, and on the 13th General Van Dorn threatened Corinth, while General Price seized the town of Iuka, which was promptly abandoned by a small garrison under Colonel Murphy. Price's force was about eight thousand men, and the general impression was that he was en route for Eastport, with the purpose to cross the Tennessee River in the direction of Nashville, in aid of General Bragg, then in full career for Kentucky. General Grant determined to attack him in force, prepared to regain Corinth before Van Dorn co
September (search for this): chapter 4
ticism of Generals Buell, Rosecrans, and Thomas, the successive commanders of the Army of the Ohio, forms one of the salient features of the Memoirs. General Rosecrans particularly distinguished himself in the battles of Iuka and Corinth, in the autumn following the first occupation of the latter place. From General Sherman's account, however, the reader would suppose that General Rosecrans had behaved badly in both these actions. Of the battle at Iuka, he says: In the early part of September the enemy in our front manifested great activity, feeling with cavalry at all points, and on the 13th General Van Dorn threatened Corinth, while General Price seized the town of Iuka, which was promptly abandoned by a small garrison under Colonel Murphy. Price's force was about eight thousand men, and the general impression was that he was en route for Eastport, with the purpose to cross the Tennessee River in the direction of Nashville, in aid of General Bragg, then in full career for Ke
September 16th (search for this): chapter 4
t of this battle, which bears date October 22d. The chief expression in it which can be construed into dissatisfaction with General Rosecrans' movements, is where he says, speaking of the delay of his column through the fault of a guide; this caused some disappointment and made a change of plans necessary, and before closing his report he calls attention to the fact that this delay was the fault of a guide. This report sums up the movement and its results as follows: On the 16th of September we commenced to collect our strength to move upon Price at Iuka, in two columns; the one to the right of the railroad, commanded by Brigadier-General (now Major-General) W. S. Rosecrans; the one to the left, commanded by Major-General O. E. C. Ord. On the night of the 18th the latter was in position to bring on an engagement in one hour's march. The former, from having a greater distance to march, and through the fault of a guide, was twenty miles back. On the 19th, by making a rapi
instantly, notifying him that he had ordered Ord's and Hurlbut's divisions rapidly across to Pocahontas, so as to strike the rebels in flank. On the morning of the 5th, General Ord reached Hatchie River at Davis' bridge, with four thousand men; crossed over and encountered the retreating army, captured a battery and several hundrehave been utterly ruined; as it was, Van Dorn regained Holly Springs somewhat demoralized. General Rosecrans did not begin his pursuit till the next morning, the 5th, and it was then too late. General Grant was again displeased with him, and never became fully reconciled. General Rosecrans was soon after relieved, and transf., October 7. It is with heartfelt gratitude the General commanding congratulates the Armies of the West for another victory, won by them on the 3d, 4th, and 5th inst., over the combined armies of Van Dorn, Price, and Lovell. * * * While one division of the army, under Major-General Rosecrans, was resisting and repelling the on
much strengthened by General Grant, and consisted of several detached redoubts bearing on each other, and inclosing the town and the depots of stores at the intersection of the two railroads. Van Dorn closed down on the forts by the evening of the 3d, and on the morning of the 4th assaulted with great vehemence. Our men, covered by good parapets, fought gallantly, and defended their posts well, inflicting terrible losses on the enemy, so that by noon the rebels were repulsed at all points angned him. [General order no. 88.] headquarters Department of West Tennessee, Jackson, Tenn., October 7. It is with heartfelt gratitude the General commanding congratulates the Armies of the West for another victory, won by them on the 3d, 4th, and 5th inst., over the combined armies of Van Dorn, Price, and Lovell. * * * While one division of the army, under Major-General Rosecrans, was resisting and repelling the onslaught of the rebel hosts at Corinth, another from Bolivar, under
October 22nd (search for this): chapter 4
eral Little, killed, and General Whitfield, wounded. I can not speak too highly of the energy and skill displayed by General Rosecrans in the attack, and of the endurance of the troops under him. General Ord's command showed untiring zeal, but the direction taken by the enemy prevented them taking the active part they desired. Price's force was about fifteen thousand. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Subsequently, General Grant made an extended report of this battle, which bears date October 22d. The chief expression in it which can be construed into dissatisfaction with General Rosecrans' movements, is where he says, speaking of the delay of his column through the fault of a guide; this caused some disappointment and made a change of plans necessary, and before closing his report he calls attention to the fact that this delay was the fault of a guide. This report sums up the movement and its results as follows: On the 16th of September we commenced to collect our str
t is, the warmest bonds of brotherhood. Each was risking life in the same cause, and on this occasion risking it also to save and assist the other. No troops could do more than these separated armies. Each did all possible for it to do in the place assigned it. * * * * By command of Major-General Grant, John A. Rawlins, A. A. G. General Grant closed his formal report of this battle as follows: As shown by the reports, the enemy was repulsed at Corinth, at 11 A. M. on the 4th, and not followed until next morning. Two days hard fighting without rest, probably, had so fatigued the troops as to make earlier pursuit impracticable. I regretted this as the enemy would have been compelled to abandon most of his artillery and transportation in the difficult roads of the Hatchie crossing had the pursuit commenced then. The victory was most triumphant as it was however, and all praise is due officers and men for their undaunted courage and obstinate resistance agains
October 5th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 4
st General Rosecrans (who had struck this death-blow), which the above extracts contain, are placed in their true light, through the telegrams sent by General Grant at the time of the movement, and his full report made later: Jackson, October 5, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. Yesterday the rebels under Van Dorn, Price, and Lovell were repulsed from their attack on Corinth with great slaughter. The enemy are in full retreat, leaving their dead and wounded on the fieldhat place. Hurlbut is at the Hatchie with five or six thousand men, and is no doubt, now with the pursuing column. From seven hundred to a thousand prisoners, beside wounded, are left on our hands. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Jackson, October 5, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. General Ord, who followed Hurlbut and took command, met the enemy to-day on the south side of the Hatchie, as I understand from a dispatch, and drove them across the stream and got possession of
October 6th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 4
I can not see how the enemy are to escape without losing every thing but their small arms. I have strained every thing to take into the fight an adequate force, and to get them to the right place. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Jackson, October 6, 1862. General H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. Generals Ord and Hurlbut came on the enemy's rear yesterday, Hurlbut having driven in small bodies the day before. After several hours hard fighting they drove the enemy five miles back across rd Corinth capturing two batteries, about three hundred prisoners, and many small arms. I immediately apprised General Rosecrans of these fact, and directed him to urge on the good work. The following dispatch just received: Chewalla, October 6, 1862. To Major-General Grant. The enemy are totally routed, throwing every thing away. We are following sharply. W. S. Rosecrans. Under previous instructions, Hurlbut is also following. McPherson is in the lead of Rosecrans' column. R
October 7th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 4
ps from Bolivar will occupy Grand Juction to-morrow. With reenforcements rapidly sent in from the new lines, I can take any thing on the Mississippi Central road. I ordered Rosecrans back last night, but he is so adverse to returning that I have directed him to remain still, until you can be heard from. U. S. Grant, Major-General. General Rosecrans' protest against giving up the pursuit, thus referred to by General Grant, was as follows: headquarters, Jonesboro, Miss., October 7, 1862, midnight. Major-General Grant, Jackson, Tenn. Yours, 8:30 P. M., received. I most deeply dissent from your views as to the policy of pursuit. We have defeated, routed, and demoralized the army which held the Lower Mississippi Valley. We have the two railroads leading south to the Gulf, through the most populous parts of this State, into which we can now pursue them by the Mississippi Central or Mobile & Ohio Road. The effect of returning to our old position will be to give them
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