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Thomas Worthington (search for this): chapter 20
river, in three lines of encampments, as already stated. General Sherman, in his sworn testimony before a courtmar-tial which, in August, 1862, tried Colonel Thomas Worthington of the 46th Ohio Volunteers, for severely criticising his management before the battle of Shiloh, said, of the position occupied by the Federals: But evn away, held their ground against sixty thousand chosen troops of the South with their best leaders. On Friday, the 4th, no officers nor soldiers, not even Colonel Worthington, looked for an attack, as I can prove. It is somewhat strange that General Sherman, in his Memoirs, should maintain that the Federal forces engaged in the battle of Shiloh numbered only thirty-two thousand men of all arms, when, four months after that event, he stated, under oath, at the trial of Colonel Worthington, that they amounted to fortythree thousand men, exclusive, be it remembered, of Lew. Wallace's division of about eight thousand men, on the northwest side of Owl Creek.
S. K. Wharton (search for this): chapter 20
, from his corps, which, with two of Carroll's regiments, now en route for these headquarters, will form a garrison for the post and depot of Corinth. VI. Strong guards will be left at the railway bridge between Iuka and Corinth, to be furnished in due proportion from the commands at Iuka, Beirnsville, and Corinth. VII. Proper guards will be left at the camps of the several regiments of the forces in the field. Corps commanders will determine the strength of these guards. VIII. Wharton's regiment of Texas cavalry will be ordered forward, at once, to scout on the road from Monterey to Savannah, between Mickey's and its intersection with the Pittsburg-Purdy road. It will annoy and harass any force of the enemy moving, by the latter way, to assail Cheatham's division at Purdy. IX. The Chief-Engineers of the forces will take due measures and precautions, and give all requisite orders, for the repair of the bridges, causeways, and roads, on which our troops may move, in t
W. W. Mackall (search for this): chapter 20
n the field, to give orders in the name of the General-in-Chief, or of the second in command; an arrangement which both Generals Johnston and Beauregard thought could inure only to the benefit of the service. Colonel Thomas Jordan, General Beauregard's Adjutant-General, was named Adjutant-General of the united forces; but remained at General Beauregard's headquarters, receiving instructions from the latter, and issuing them in the form of orders, by command of the General-in-Chief. General Mackall was not made Adjutant-General of the united armies, because of his having been previously assigned, by General Beauregard, to the command of Madrid Bend, on the Mississippi, his services at that important point being considered indispensable. See Chapter XVIII., p. 257. General Beauregard, notwithstanding his impaired health, devoted himself assiduously to preparing the army for an immediate offensive movement, which he hoped would take place, at latest, on the 1st of April, as our
description of the field of Shiloh. strength of the Federal forces. what General Sherman testified to. we form into three lines of battle. our effective strengthy, near his temporary headquarters, within less than two miles of those of General Sherman, at the Shiloh meetinghouse. He was then informed, by Major-General Polk,qual to regulars, if attacked in front, as the Federals would be by us; General Sherman, in his Memoirs, says of the Federal position: The position was naturally -house and the river, in three lines of encampments, as already stated. General Sherman, in his sworn testimony before a courtmar-tial which, in August, 1862, trigton, looked for an attack, as I can prove. It is somewhat strange that General Sherman, in his Memoirs, should maintain that the Federal forces engaged in the baearned that General Grant had returned for the night to Savannah, and that General Sherman commanded the advanced forces. No other information of importance was obt
A. R. Chisolm (search for this): chapter 20
nsportation. These orders were immediately despatched by couriers, from General Bragg's headquarters, to Generals Polk and Hardee, who received them, as well as now remembered, at 1.40 A. M., as stated in the receipts signed by those officers, respectively, at the time. General Breckinridge, commanding a detached division at Beirnsville, received his orders from the telegraph-office. After having despatched the orders in question, I repaired directly to your headquarters, roused Captain A. R. Chisolm, of your personal staff, and told him to awake you at 5 A. M. About 7 A. M. of (next day) the 3d April, you sent for me, and I found that you had drawn up the notes of a general order, prescribing the order and method of the movement from Corinth upon Pittsburg, with peculiar minuteness, as, from the wooded and broken nature of the country to be traversed, it would be a most difficult matter to move so large a body of men with the requisite celerity for the contemplated attack. T
J. L. Bowen (search for this): chapter 20
to Pittsburg, passing through Griersford, on Lick Creek. The cavalry will throw well forward advanced guards and videttes towards Griersford and in the direction of Hamburg, and during the impending battle, when called to the field of combat, will move by the Griersford road. A regiment of the infantry reserve will be thrown forward to the intersection of the Gravel Hill road with the Ridge road to Hamburg, as a support to the cavalry. The reserve will be formed of Breckinridge's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, as now organized, the whole under command of Brigadier-General Breckinridge. V. General Bragg will detail the 51st and 52d regiments Tennessee Volunteers, Blount's Alabama and Desha's Arkansas battalion, and Bairn's battery, from his corps, which, with two of Carroll's regiments, now en route for these headquarters, will form a garrison for the post and depot of Corinth. VI. Strong guards will be left at the railway bridge between Iuka and Corinth, to be fur
W. J. Hardee (search for this): chapter 20
too late to commence action on that day. Generals Hardee and Bragg request General Beauregard to ra circular letter to Generals Bragg, Polk, and Hardee, directing them to hold their several corps inral Bragg's headquarters, to Generals Polk and Hardee, who received them, as well as now remembered,osed it. By this time, Major-Generals Polk and Hardee had likewise arrived. I then remarked that, aick Creek. 1. The Third Corps, under Major-General Hardee, will advance, as soon as practicable, wo good guides, will report for service to General Hardee. 3. At 3 o'clock A. M., to-morrow, the letter, addressed to Generals Bragg, Polk, and Hardee, severally corps commanders. As for the ordommence the action on that day. Soon after General Hardee's line of battle (the front one) had been to three lines of battle; the first, under General Hardee, extended from near Owl Creek, on the left or otherwise, according to exigencies. General Hardee's effective force of infantry and artiller[5 more...]
Wellington (search for this): chapter 20
g one by turning this offensive movement into a reconnoissance in force, to draw the enemy after us nearer to our base—Corinth—and thereby detach him further from his own, at Pittsburg Landing. Somewhat similar strategy had been resorted to by Wellington in 1810, when, advancing to attack Massena at Santarem, he unexpectedly found that able officer on his guard, ready for battle, on ground of his own choosing, and much stronger than he had anticipated. After making some demonstrations in front of his wily adversary, to draw him away from his stronghold, Wellington did not hesitate to retire without giving battle. General Beauregard's views produced a visible effect on all present. General Johnston, although shaken, after some reflection said that he admitted the weight and force of General Beauregard's remarks, but still hoped we could find the enemy unprepared for an attack; that as our army had been put in motion for battle and was now on the field, it would be better to make
Thomas Jordan (search for this): chapter 20
n immediate advance. General Johnston yields. General Jordan's statement of his interview with General Johnsst in command, without any alteration whatever. Thomas Jordan, A. A. G. Our forces had thus been formed id inure only to the benefit of the service. Colonel Thomas Jordan, General Beauregard's Adjutant-General, was at Pittsburg Landing. General (then Colonel) Thomas Jordan, the Adjutant-General above alluded to, reports yonet. By command of General A. S. Johnston, Thomas Jordan, A. Adjt.-Gen. Corinth, Miss., April 18th, 18me without modification in a single particular. Thomas Jordan, Brig.-Gen. and A. A. G. The following passrquhart, of General Bragg's staff, addressed to General Jordan. It confirms, as the reader will see, all that * * * * * Yours truly, David Urquhart. To General Thomas Jordan, New York. At the hour prescribed in thebattle. The sketch of the country furnished by General Jordan, Adjutant-General of the Confederate forces, in
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 20
rmy Corps and the reserve. VIII. Major-General Braxton Bragg, in addition to his duties as commard was announced as second in command, and General Bragg was appointed, nominally, Chief of the Gen movement. His views shook the opinion of General Bragg. Having discussed the subject almost dailvement, which orders I wrote at a table in General Bragg's room, being a circular letter to Generale immediately despatched by couriers, from General Bragg's headquarters, to Generals Polk and Harded of Brigadier-General Breckinridge. V. General Bragg will detail the 51st and 52d regiments Ten1862, to the headquarters or apartments of General Bragg, at Corinth, Mississippi. On that occasioe shape of a circular letter, addressed to Generals Bragg, Polk, and Hardee, severally corps command of the first, was composed of the rest of General Bragg's troops, arranged in the same order. Genght hundred yards in rear of the centre of General Bragg's left wing, and each brigade was followed[17 more...]
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