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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,286 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 656 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 566 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 416 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 360 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 298 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 298 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 272 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) or search for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 10 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
of the Abbepoola, to deter the enemy, and Colonel Page commanding, with Major Jenkins of the South Carolina troops, and Colonel Del. Kemper of the artillery, were ordered to drive them off. This they cool and gallant soldier, Major Jenkins, the brother of the lamented General M. Jenkins, of South Carolina. After the fight was over he asked the gallant Page-how he could be so unflinching, withoutams Run. Major Jenkins had no force but two companies of our brigade and Humphrey's troop of South Carolina calvary. The enemy divided into two columns of 3,000 each, the one moving up the Bohickett were taken from our division, to reinforce Pickett at Five Forks and Evans' old brigade, of South Carolina, then commanded by General W. H. Wallace, and our brigade were alone left at Hatcher's Run. the 6th April. What was left of our division, Wise's brigade of Virginia, and Wallace's of South Carolina, were posted on the left of Pickett's division, then reduced to an inconsiderable number by
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), James Louis Petigru, (search)
up to these demands, fulfills all these requirements, and has woven around it an interest far above the average. He was admitted to be the foremost lawyer of South Carolina by his profession and the public generally. If I were to say that he was the foremost lawyer of the South, I do not believe the statement would be challengedpolitics. He was a Union man and was opposed to nulification and secession. In Carolina at that time his was an exceedingly unpopular stand to take. Indeed South Carolina was the leader in both these movements. Our people had but little sympathy for those who entertained opposite ideas on these subjects. And yet there were a en, and conservative in their ideas and views. In the third place they were men of high character, wide experience and more than average ability. They loved South Carolina. She was their native State and was as dear to them as the apple of the eye. Around and about her were centered their affections and interests. They well kn
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
ge, threatening manner asked why I left the boy. In a few seconds he recovered himself, and turned and walked off into the woods alone. He soon came back, however, and I continued my report of the wounded and the dead. We were still sitting by the fire, drinking the coffee out of our tin cups, when I said: We have won this battle by the hardest kind of fighting. And he answered me very gently and softly: No, no; we have won it by the blessing of Almighty God. When General Gregg, of South Carolina, was wounded at Fredericksburg, an interesting incident occurred. General Jackson had had some misunderstanding with Gregg, the nature of which I do not now recall. The night after this gallant gentleman and splendid soldier was mortally wounded, I told General Jackson, as I generally did of friends or prominent men killed and wounded. General Gregg was one of the most courteous and gallant gentlemen that I had ever known. He exposed himself that day in a way that seemed unneccessary
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
y your committee to present this tribute to the memory of our old commander and one of your honorary members, General G. M. P. Young. Pardon the seeming egotism —in reference unavoidable—in mentioning his services on the coast of Georgia and South Carolina, and shall offer this in lieu of the customary annual address of the President of this Association, as it is the historian's duty to keep up your records. Comrades of the Cobb Legion, Georgia Cavalry, little did we think as we marched the the third time was he wounded, and as usual in displaying conspicuous gallantry, for which he was promoted major-general of cavalry. Sherman's forces threatening the powder mills at Augusta, Beauregard, Bragg, the Governors of Georgia and South Carolina appealed for reinforcements from the Army of Northern Virginia. Major-General P. M. B. Young, with a division (?), consisting of 900 dismounted cavalrymen, under the immediate command of Captain F. E. Eve, was all that General Robert E. Lee c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cumberland Grays, Company D, Twenty-first Virginia Infantry. (search)
t Davis and his party stopped on their retreat. Here was held the last official meeting of the Confederate government; here the President and his Cabinet gave up the cause as lost, and each member undertook to provide as best he could for his own safety. Had I the notes of the memorable journey from Danville to Washington, Ga., the meeting with Johnston at Greensboroa, pages could be written of this meeting. The journey from Greensboroa to Charlotte, the flight from that point through South Carolina, and last, that final meeting at Washington, are all events of greatest interest, and columns could be written; but these notes cannot be obtained in time for this article. An explosion. But to resume our story at Danville. As stated before, there were warehouses filled with provisions, stores, etc., for the army. The neighboring hills of Virginia and North Carolina and the valley of the River Dan were well populated. The news of the fall of Richmond, the surrender of Lee, and t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
t Davis and his party stopped on their retreat. Here was held the last official meeting of the Confederate government; here the President and his Cabinet gave up the cause as lost, and each member undertook to provide as best he could for his own safety. Had I the notes of the memorable journey from Danville to Washington, Ga., the meeting with Johnston at Greensboroa, pages could be written of this meeting. The journey from Greensboroa to Charlotte, the flight from that point through South Carolina, and last, that final meeting at Washington, are all events of greatest interest, and columns could be written; but these notes cannot be obtained in time for this article. An explosion. But to resume our story at Danville. As stated before, there were warehouses filled with provisions, stores, etc., for the army. The neighboring hills of Virginia and North Carolina and the valley of the River Dan were well populated. The news of the fall of Richmond, the surrender of Lee, and t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
njamin set out on his trip southward from Danville shortly after this, he was asked by Dr. Hoge if he was not afraid of being captured. With a significant smile, he replied: I shall never be taken alive. Mr. Benjamin remained with the presidential cavalcade until it reached Georgia, when he separated from his companions. Up to that time he had passed as a French military officer, having a passport in that language, which he spoke like a native. He rode a very tall horse, purchased in South Carolina, and said to be one of the finest in that State. When he left President Davis' party he purchased a cart and horse, and, disguised as a pedler, wearing immense green goggles, he worked his way toward the coast. On one occasion he stopped over night with a gentleman who was acquainted with and who recognized him despite his disguise. Being the soul of politeness, the host made no sign to show that he had penetrated the incognito of his guest, and that it was not until the morning, whe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
here Mrs. Semmes met her parents, who were delighted that a son-in-law of theirs had this high honor conferred upon him, so dearly did they love the South. Mrs. Semmes referred laughingly to the beautiful trousseau that her father presented her with to take to Richmond, as became the wife of a Confederate Senator. In Congress, Mr. Semmes was at once appointed a member of the Finance Committee, in connection with Honorable R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia, and Honorable Robert Barnwell, of South Carolina, and a member of the Judiciary Committee, of which Honorable B. H. Hill was chairman. He was also chairman of the joint committee on the flag and seal of the Confederate States. As chairman of the joint committee on flag and seal, Mr. Semmes took an active part, and his efforts were of no little importance in the selection and adoption of an appropriate motto for the seal finally adopted. In conjunction with Mr. Hunter, he prepared the tax in kind bill, which practically supported the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
ation, and two of them relate the experiences of prison Life—Stories of Captain F. C. Barnes and Captain R. E. Frayser. A list of the officers under fire, as above, including those as well from Maryland, North Carolina, Texas, Mississippi, South Carolina, Florida, Alabama, Missouri, Kentucky, and Tennessee, has been given in Vol. XVII, Southern Historical Society Papers, pp. 34-46, but as the list from Virginia herewith is more complete and definitely descriptive, it is meet that it should blarge ocean steamer, Crescent City, then lying in the bay below the breakwater. We sailed the next day for parts unknown, but still believing we were going to be exchanged. During the voyage we ran aground on Cape Romain, off the coast of South Carolina, when a large lot of coal had to be thrown off to lighten the ship, before sailing again. While stranded, a large gunboat came in sight and created great commotion among the officers and guard of the boat. They were apprehensive that an att
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
iniscences of, 317. Semple, Major H. C., 321. Seven Days Battles, 161. Seven Pines, Battle of, 157, 158, 208, 215. Sharpsburg, Battle of, 95, 106, 164. Shenandoah, Career and Officers of, 116. Shepherdstown, Battle of, 254. Signal Corps, C. S. A., The, 130. Slaves, Proclamation freeing them, 378. Slidell, Hon., John, 191. Smith, General G. W., 158, 222. Smith, General W. F., 5, 13. Soldiers of 200 years, The greatest, 92 Southanna Bridge, Battle of, 337. South Carolina, Operations in, 1863-4, 7. South, Life in the, before 1861, 324. South Mountain Gap, Battle of, 162. South, Righteous Cause of the, 357. Spinola Family, The. 188. Spotsylvania C. H., Battle of, 170, 261, 340. Sprunt, Hon., James, 378. Starke, Colonel A. W, 3, 4 Stedman, Charles M., 334. Stewart, Colonel W. H., 77, 285. Stiles, Major, Robert, 39. Strange, Major, James, 135. Streight, Colonel A. D., Capture of, 45. Stribling, Robert M., 67. Sumter, Fort, 131.