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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 26 26 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 25 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 24 24 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 22 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 22 22 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 21 21 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 21 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 20 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 19 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for July 1st or search for July 1st in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
om Brigadier-General Brannan, there was no more artillery firing until June 26, on account of the small supply of ammunition. Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, was placed in park in rear of the Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Battery. June 27, by order of Major-General Howard, all the batteries of the corps opened fire upon the enemy for fifteen minutes at 8 a. m., after which the corps charged the enemy's works, led by General Newton's division, supported by General Wood's division. July 1, in accordance with orders received from Major-General Thomas, the artillery of the corps opened fire upon the enemy at 6 p. m., and resumed firing one-half hour at 6 a.m. July 2. July 3, the enemy having evacuated Kenesaw Mountain, the batteries marched with their divisions through Marietta to Neal Dow Station, where the Fifth Indiana and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Batteries were placed in position on the left of the railroad and engaged the enemy. July 4, the Fifth Indiana Light Battery, T
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 84 (search)
e right; went into park in an open field in rear of General Davis' division, Fourteenth Army Corps; remained in this position until the p. m. of the 28th, when I was moved about 500 yards to the left and rear, by order Captain Goodspeed, chief of artillery, Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, and put into camp, remaining in camp until the morning of the 30th, when I was moved by Captain Goodspeed about 100 yards to the front and put in position, relieving Battery A, First Ohio Artillery. July 1, remained in same position occupied June 30; fired sixteen rounds without getting any reply from the enemy. July 2, remained in same position; fired forty-one rounds; enemy did not reply; moved position in the evening about 1,000 yards to the left; took position on a hill; relieved one of General Wood's batteries; remained over night, doing no firing from this position. July 3, the enemy having evacuated during the night, marched in rear of the division through Marietta, Ga., and camped th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 89 (search)
ision, Fourth Army Corps; expended-shot, 27; shell, 17; total, 44 rounds. 18th, pursued the enemy, driving him, and expending-shot, 121; shell, 113; case 90; total, 324 rounds; Private Hersh killed; Privates Craig and Everett wounded severely; one spare wheel destroyed by shell. 19th, moved on Marietta road. 20th, took position on main line near Kenesaw Mountain, and remained until July 2, expending rounds of ammunition as follows: June 20, 457. June 22, 44. June 23, 155. June 27, 5 shot. July 1, 3 shot, 8 shell, 9 case; total, 20. July 2, 11 shot, 20 shell, 27 case; total, 58. July 3, left camp and pursued the enemy, coming up with him on the 5th near Chattahoochee River; took position on main line; remained until 10th, expending ammunition as follows: 5th, 12 shell, 14 case; total, 26. 6th, 30 shot, 59 shell, 88 case; total, 177; First Lieut. O. H. P. Ayres severely wounded. 7th, 43 shot, 39 shell, 43 case; total, 125. 9th, 25 shot, 18 shell, 17 case; total, 60. 10th, 10 shot
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 91 (search)
ring the month. Casualties during the month: First Division-commissioned officers, 2 killed and 5 wounded; enlisted men, 46 killed, 180 wounded, and 8 missing; total in First Division, 241. Second Division-commissioned officers, 15 killed, 38 wounded, and 2 missing; enlisted men, 210 killed, 702 wounded, and 35 missing; total in Second Division, 1,002. Third Division-commissioned officers, 2 killed and 6 wounded; enlisted men, 33 killed and 182 wounded; total in Third Division, 223. July 1 and 2.-The corps was in position in front of Kenesaw Mountain. On the night of the 2d the enemy evacuated his works. July 3 and 4.-The corps marched in pursuit, capturing a number of prisoners; had considerable skirmishing. July 5.-The enemy retreated to the Chattahoochee River during the night. July 6.-The corps moved in pursuit, and on arriving in close proximity to the position taken by the enemy along the river, sharp skirmishing ensued, and was kept up until night, during w
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 99 (search)
Stoughton, commanding Second Brigade, to strengthen his lines; with him two days, when the rest of our brigade relieved the Second; brisk skirmishing and cannonading nearly the whole time we were in this position; rebel dead lying outside of our works for some days and smell very bad; tried to compromise long enough to have them buried, but they would not allow us. June 30, relieved by right wing of brigade; considerable cannonading; lost I man killed. Again we were relieved by Fourth Corps July 1, and moved to the left near the mountain, with our left flank considerably refused. July 2, rebels evacuated the mountain during the night, the Stars and Stripes floating triumphantly over it. July 3, marched through Marietta along the railroad; toward evening had considerable skirmishing with the enemy, driving them, and lying on our arms all night. I moved forward next morning, July 4, in advance of brigade, driving the rebels, and establishing our lines for the night in the edge of s
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 102 (search)
e front until June 17. Near Kenesaw Mountain, June 21, 1 man wounded on skirmish line; 9 p. m., were placed in second line of works. June 22, artillery firing heavy; 1 commissioned officer and 6 men wounded by shell from. the enemy's guns. July 1, 1 man killed by rebel sharpshooter. During the night of July 2 the enemy evacuated his position and retreated four miles below Marietta. The night of July 9 the enemy again withdrew across the Chattahoochee River. Camped on the opposite side 1 man killed by rebel sharpshooter. During the night of July 2 the enemy evacuated his position and retreated four miles below Marietta. The night of July 9 the enemy again withdrew across the Chattahoochee River. Camped on the opposite side of river from the enemy until July 17, when we moved across the river. During the engagement July 20 we were in support of the left wing of brigade; lost 1 man killed and 7 wounded by rebel shell. July 22, were engaged in front of Atlanta; 2 men wounded. August 7, advanced the lines; 3 men wounded. August 13, 1 man killed. August 15, 1 man killed. August 20, 1 man wounded. August 24, 1 man killed. Moved the night of the 26th; no casualties in regiment since. The officers and men
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 112 (search)
ain Fetterman commanded the Second Battalion until relieved by Captain Kellogg, July 11, and then served with his company until July 15, when he was appointed acting assistant adjutant-general Second Brigade, First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, by General King. Captain Fetterman has furnished a report of the operations of the Second Battalion while in command, which report is hereto attached. Captain Kellogg joined and assumed command of the detachment June 14 and of the Second Battalion July 1, and August 11 he consolidated the sixteen companies into eight companies for field and tactical purposes. From July 11 to July 21 the detachment was commanded by Captain Kellogg, with Captain Smith as acting field officer and second in command, and from July 21 to September 1 with Capt. Robert B. Hull as acting field officer and second in command. Captain Kellogg was wounded in action September 1, and the command of the detachment was assumed by me on the same day and on the battle-field
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 120 (search)
d musketry of the enemy. In the battle before Jonesborough, September 1 instant, which resulted so gloriously to our arms, this regiment was again engaged. Charging through a dense brush thicket, under a murderous fire from the enemy, losing 5 enlisted men killed, 30 enlisted men wounded, and 1 enlisted man missing; and captured 1 rebel adjutant, 6 men, and 24 stand of arms. We took prisoners as follows: July 9, 18 privates, Vining's Station; July 10, 5 privates, Vining's Station; July 20, 1 private, Nancy's Creek; July 22, 2 privates, Peach Tree Creek; September 1, 1 officer, 6 privates, Jonesborough, Ga. Total, 33. Total stand of arms captured, 54. Our casualties are: Officers-killed, 2; wounded, 5; missing, 1. Privates-killed, 32; wounded, 119; missing, 1. Total, 160. A list of the casualties accompanies this report. I here desire to mention the never-failing gallantry of Adjt. E. L. Baird, whose efficient aid under all circumstances during the campaign greatly contrib
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 142 (search)
ace of not over twenty minutes the regiment lost 153 men. Of the 19 commissioned officers who went into the charge 10 were killed or wounded. Although the assault was not successful, still a most important advantage was gained, and we had the melancholy satisfaction of knowing that we failed only because we attempted impossibilities. 28th, remained in same position, within stone's throw of the rebel works, and heavy firing from the main lines, Major Sullivant in command. 29th and 30th, and 1st and 2d of July, no material change in position, but continued heavy skirmishing, with an occasional casualty. 3d, the enemy evacuated his works at night, we following through Marietta, came upon him and again intrenched. 4th, no change. 5th, the enemy fell back to his works at the Chattahoochee River, we following; in the morning found him strongly intrenched above and below the railroad bridge, in the form of a semi-circle, with each extremity of the arc resting on the river. We took pos
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 155 (search)
ition in the line one-quarter of a mile to the right and front. On the 28th the Twenty-fourth Illinois Infantry was relieved from duty and ordered to Springfield, Ill., to be mustered out of service by reason of expiration of term of service. From the 17th to the 30th, inclusive, though not engaged in action, the brigade was constantly exposed by night and day to the enemy's fire, and we had much hot work on the skirmish line. Our lines were constantly in close proximity to the enemy. July 1 and 2, remained in position. On the night of the 2d the enemy evacuated Marietta. On the 3d marched through the suburbs of Marietta, on the Atlanta road, and took up a position four miles south of the town and west of the railroad. On the 4th moved about one-fourth of a mile, and took up a position in reserve. On the 5th moved to a position on the railroad ten miles from Atlanta. 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th, remained in position. On the 10th moved to Pace's Ferry, on the Chattahoochee Rive
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