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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A reply to General Longstreet. (search)
away on the night of the 1st, for in his official report he says that McLaws's division . . . reached Marsh Creek, four miles from Gettysburg, a little after dark, and Hood's division [except Law's brigade] got within nearly the same distance of the town about 12 o'clock at night. Hood says he was with his staff in front of the heights of Gettysburg shortly after daybreak on the 2d, and his troops were close behind. Kershaw (of McLaws's division) says in his official report that on the 1st of July they marched to a point on the Gettysburg road some two miles from that place, going into camp at 12 P. M. General Longstreet, to explain his delay, besides the above reasons scrapes together a number of others,--such as the presence of some Federal scouts and pickets west of the Emmitsburg road, the movement of Sickles's rear-guard along that road, the presence of one of General Lee's engineers (who had been sent to give information, not to command his corps). No time need be wasted
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.53 (search)
rms, 59,484, infantry. The morning report of the Army of the Potomac for June 30th shows Present for duty, equipped, 77,208, infantry. Neither return is worth much except as a basis for guessing; the long marches, followed by the forced ones of July 1-2, of the Army of the Potomac left thousands of stragglers on the roads. These totals are of little importance; they would have been of some significance had the larger army been defeated; but it was not. At the points of contact the Confederates were almost always the stronger. On July 1st 18,000 Federal combatants contended against at least 25,000 Confederates, and got the worst of it. On July 2d Longstreet's 15,000 overcame Sickles's 10,000, and had to halt when a larger force was opposed to them. Williams's Twelfth Corps retook its works from a larger body of Ewell's troops, for at the contested point they were opposed by an inferior number; and then held them, for Johnson's superior force was as much hampered here by the nature
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The cavalry battle near Gettysburg. (search)
nction, Pennsylvania, on the Northern Central Railroad, where we arrived during the forenoon of July 1st. Our movements at this place illustrate to some extent the uncertainties of the campaign. Aft army but three days when the action began. Second, the collision of the two armies on the 1st of July took place while headquarters were at a distance. Third, the battle, on the Union side, wahe 30th the two armies continued rapidly to approach each other, until, on the morning of the 1st of July, a stunning collision took place between the heads of Lee's columns and our left wing under Rmns, and committed the Union army to battle at Gettysburg. The reports which, at noon of the 1st of July, reached the new commander at Taneytown, brought news that Reynolds had fallen, together withs made acquainted with the great exertions I made to mass my army at Gettysburg on the night of July 1st, it must appear entirely incomprehensible that I should order it to retreat, after collecting a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.58 (search)
oving my corps twelve miles from Emmitsburg to Gettysburg, on the afternoon of July 1st, to help Howard after Reynolds fell; also by my letter to General Meade, written at Gettysburg at 9 o'clock on the night of July 1st, asking his approval of my march, made without orders, and urging him to come to Gettysburg with his army, desct I consider this no place to fight a battle. This was after the combats of the 1st and 2d of July, and after twenty thousand Union soldiers had fallen on that fielivision of the Twelfth Corps was ordered by General Hancock, on the evening of July 1st, to the high ground to the right of and near Round Top mountain, commanding that all; that it was massed to the right of Round Top during the night of the 1st of July, and had moved over to Culp's Hill before I had received his instructions to heroic stand made by John Buford on the Cashtown road on the morning of the 1st of July; the brilliant deployments of his cavalry, holding the enemy in check for ho
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
t. George H. Mendell. First Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. John F. Reynolds of this corps was killed July 1st, while in command of the left wing of the army. Maj.-Gen. Abner Doubleday, Maj.-Gen. John Newto Y., Col. Charles Wheelock (c), Maj. Charles Northrup; 11th Pa., Transferred on afternoon of July 1st to the First Brigade. Col. Richard Coulter, Capt. Benjamin F. Haines (w), Capt. John B. Overmyehe Second Division assumed command of the corps. These assignments terminated on the evening of July 1. Similar changes in commanders occurred during the battle of the 2d, when General Hancock was pal between the death of General Reynolds and the arrival of General Hancock on the afternoon of July 1st, all the troops on the field of battle were commanded by General Howard, General Schurz taking ar the names of 12,227 wounded and unwounded Confederates captured at and about Gettysburg from July 1st to 5th, inclusive. The number of wounded prisoners is reported by the medical director of Mead
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Vicksburg. (search)
bung-hole, was touched off by myself with a live coal, and the barrel was rolled over the parapet by two of our sappers. The barrel went true to its destination and exploded with terrific force. Timbers, gabions, and fascineswere hurled into the air in all directions and the sappers once more were compelled to retire. They renewed their operations, however, at night, and in a few days succeeded in establishing their mine under the redan, which they exploded at 1:30 o'clock p. M. on the 1st of July. The charge was enormous--one and a quarter tons, as I subsequently learned from the Federal engineer. The crater made was about twenty feet deep and fifty feet in diameter. The redan was virtually destroyed, and the explosive effect extended back far enough to make a breach of nearly twenty feet width in the retrenchment across the gorge of the work. We expected an assault, but previous experience had made the enemy cautious. Instead, they opened upon the work a most terrific fire f
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
anks. We found it impossible to continue this work. Another mine was consequently started, which was exploded on the 1st of July, destroying an entire rebel redan, killing and wounding a considerable number of its occupants, and leaving an immenseposite Bruinsburg. The roads west were not of a character to draw supplies over for any considerable force. By the 1st of July our approaches had reached the enemy's ditch at a number of places. At ten points we could move under cover to withinith cotton packed in tightly, were ordered prepared, to enable the troops to cross the ditches. On the night of the 1st of July Johnston was between Brownsville and the Big Black, and wrote Pemberton from there that about the 7th of the month an to create a diversion to enable him to cut his way out. Pemberton was a prisoner before this message reached him. On July 1st Pemberton, seeing no hope of outside relief, addressed the following letter to each of his four division commanders:
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Vicksburg mine. (search)
structed a casemate out of the heavy timbers found in the crater, and upon which the earth was thrown until it was of sufficient depth to resist the destructive effects of the exploding shells. As soon as this work was completed, and a parapet was thrown up across the crater on a line with the face of the casemate, the troops were withdrawn to the new line beyond the range of exploding shells. The crater being secured, again the miners were set at work running a new gallery under the left wing of the Fort. This mine was exploded on the 1st of July, leaving the Fort a total wreck. in the meantime the main sap had been widened sufficiently to admit of the convenient movement of troops in column of fours during the contemplated assault, the necessity for which was happily avoided by the surrender on the following day. Vickssurg, from the River. From a photograph. arrival of General Grant at General Pemberton's Vioksburg House, July 4, 1863. from a Sketoh made at the time.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
ed W. Ellet soon after received a brigadier-general's commission, with instructions to organize and equip the Mississippi Marine Brigade for future work in patrolling the river. He also received commissions for such of his men as he chose to recommend. Charles Rivers Ellet, though but nineteen years of age, received a colonel's commission, and succeeded to the command of the ram fleet w hich his father, Charles Ellet, Jr., had created.--Edttors. Davis arrived above Vicksburg on the 1st of July, and joined Farragut with four gun-boats and six mortar-boats. The fleets remained here at anchor for several days, while the army was attempting to make a cut-off across the neck of the land opposite Vicksburg, and thus create a new channel out of range of the batteries on the bluffs. During this time Porter continued his daily bombardment. Beyond this nothing was attempted, there being no force of troops to make it worth while. While matters were in this condition, it was resolved
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