hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 1 1 Browse Search
Hyperides, Speeches 1 1 Browse Search
Hyperides, Speeches 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 3-4 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Demades, On the Twelve Years 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 71 results in 66 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica, chapter 29 (search)
ing condemned as a voluntary prisoner and an unworthy soldier. On another slab are the names of those who fought in the region of Thrace and at Megara445 B.C., and when Alcibiades persuaded the Arcadians in Mantinea and the Eleans to revolt from the Lacedaemonians420 B.C., and of those who were victorious over the Syracusans before Demosthenes arrived in Sicily. Here were buried also those who fought in the sea-fights near the Hellespont409 B.C., those who opposed the Macedonians at Charonea338 B.C.>, those who marched with Cleon to Amphipolis<422 B.C., those who were killed at Delium in the territory of Tanagra424 B.C., the men Leosthenes led into Thessaly, those who sailed with Cimon to Cyprus449 B.C., and of those who with OlympiodorusSee Paus. 1.26.3. expelled the garrison not more than thirteen men. The Athenians declare that when the Romans were waging a border war they sent a small force to help them, and later on five Attic warships assisted the Romans in a naval action against
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Corinth, chapter 38 (search)
.C.. All were killed except one Spartan and two Argives, and here were raised the graves for the dead. But the Lacedaemonians, having fought against the Argives with all their forces, won a decisive victory; at first they themselves enjoyed the fruits of the land, but afterwards they assigned it to the Aeginetans, when they were expelled from their island by the Athenians431 B.C.. In my time Thyreatis was inhabited by the Argives, who say that they recovered it by the award of an arbitration338 B.C. As you go from these common graves you come to Athene, where Aeginetans once made their home, another village Neris, and a third Eua, the largest of the villages, in which there is a sanctuary of Polemocrates. This Polemocrates is one of the sons of Machaon, and the brother of Alexanor; he cures the people of the district, and receives honors from the neighbours. Above the villages extends Mount Parnon, on which the Lacedaemonian border meets the borders of the Argives and Tegeatae. On the
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 2, chapter 4 (search)
ent is borne out by the inscription at Olympia:In wrestling only I alone conquered twice the men at Olympia and at Pytho,Thrice at Nemea, and four times at the Isthmus near the sea;Chilon of Patrae, son of Chilon, whom the Achaean folkBuried for my valour when I died in battle. Thus much is plain from the inscription. But the date of Lysippus, who made the statue, leads me to infer about the war in which Chilon fell, that plainly either he marched to Chaeroneia with the whole of the Achaeans338 B.C., or else his personal courage and daring led him alone of the Achaeans to fight against the Macedonians under Antipater at the battle of Lamia in Thessaly323 B.C.. Next to Chilon two statues have been set up. One is that of a man named Molpion, who, says the inscription, was crowned by the Eleans. The other statue bears no inscription, but tradition says that it represents Aristotle from Stageira in Thrace, and that it was set up either by a pupil or else by some soldier aware of Aristotle'
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Achaia, chapter 6 (search)
hey stayed at home to guard their several fatherlands, while because of the Trojan war they scorned to be led by Dorians of Lacedaemon. This became plain in course of time. For when later on the Lacedaemonians began the war with the Athenians432 B.C., the Achaeans were eager for the alliance with Patrae, and were no less well disposed towards Athens. Of the wars waged afterwards by the confederate Greeks, the Achaeans took part in the battle of Chaeroneia against the Macedonians under Philip338 B.C., but they say that they did not march out into Thessaly to what is called the Lamian war323 B.C., for they had not yet recovered from the reverse in Boeotia. The local guide at Patrae used to say that the wrestler Chilon was the only Achaean who took part in the action at Lamia. I myself know that Adrastus, a Lydian, helped the Greeks as a private individual, although the Lydian commonwealth held aloof. A likeness of this Adrastus in bronze was dedicated in front of the sanctuary of Persian
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Arcadia, chapter 6 (search)
compulsion rather than sympathy that made them join the Lacedaemonians in their war against Athens and in crossing over to Asia with Agesilaus;396 B.C they also followed the Lacedaemonians to Leuctra in Boeotia.371 B.C Their distrust of the Lacedaemonians was shown on many occasions; in particular, immediately after the Lacedaemonian reverse at Leuctra they seceded from them and joined the Thebans. Though they did not fight on the Greek side against Philip and the Macedonians at Chaeroneia,338 B.C nor later in Thessaly against Antipater, yet they did not actually range themselves against the Greeks. It was because of the Lacedaemonians, they say, that they took no part in resisting the Gallic threat to Thermopylae; they feared that their land would be laid waste in the absence of their men of military age. As members of the Achaean League the Arcadians were more enthusiastic than any other Greeks. The fortunes of each individual city, as distinct from those of the Arcadian people as
Strabo, Geography, Book 6, chapter 3 (search)
sequence of this they also were poorly governed. One evidence of their bad policies is the fact that they employed foreign generals; for they sent for AlexanderAlexander I was appointed king of Epeirus by Philip of Macedonia about 342 B.C., and was killed by a Luecanian about 330 B.C. (cp. 6. 1. 5). the Molossian to lead them in their war against the Messapians and Leucanians, and, still before that, for Archidamus,Archidamus III, king of Sparta, was born about 400 B.C. and lost his life in 338 B.C. in this war. the son of Agesilaüs, and, later on, for Cleonymus,Little is know of this Cleonymus, save that he was the son of Cleomenes II, who reigned at Sparta 370-309 B.C. and Agathocles,Agathocles (b. about 361 B.C.—d. 289 B.C.) was a tyrant of Syracuse. He appears to have led the Tarantini about 300 B.C. and then for Pyrrhus,Pyrrhus (about 318-272 B.C.), king of Epeirus, accepted the invitation of Tarentum in 281 B.C. at the time when they formed a league with him against the Roman
Strabo, Geography, Book 9, chapter 2 (search)
s hope; but still they went to war on behalf of the Greeks against the Phocians, who had robbed their common temple. And after suffering loss from this war, as also from the Macedonians when these attacked the Greeks,At the battle of Chaeroneia (338 B.C.). they lost their city,335 B.C. which was razed to the ground by these same people, and then received it back from them when rebuilt.By Cassander (316 B.C.). From that time on the Thebans have fared worse and worse down to our own time, and is a spring called Tilphossa, and the monument of Teiresias, who died there at the time of the flight. Chaeroneia is near Orchomenus. It was here that Philip the son of Amyntas conquered the Athenians, Boeotians, and Corinthians in a great battle,338 B.C. and set himself up as lord of Greece. And here, too, are to be seen tombs of those who fell in the battle, tombs erected at public expense. And it was in the same region that the Romans so completely defeated the forces of Mithridates, many
Strabo, Geography, Book 9, chapter 3 (search)
not the same as Hyampeia on Parnassus; also far inland is Elateia, the largest city of the Phocians, which is unknown by Homer, for it is more recent than the Homeric age, and it is advantageously situated in that it commands the passes from Thessaly. DemosthenesDem. 18.168 clearly indicates the natural advantage of its position when he speaks of the commotion that suddenly took place at Athens when a messenger came to the Prytanes with the report that Elateia had been captured.By Philip in 338 B.C. Parapotamii is a settlement on the Cephissus River near Phanoteus and Chaeroneia and Elateia. Theopompus says that this place is distant from Chaeroneia about forty stadia and marks the boundary of the territories of the Ambryseans, the Panopeans and the Daulians; and that it lies on a moderately high hill at the pass which leads from Boeotia into Phocis, between the mountains Parnassus and Hadylius, between which is left a tract of about five stadia divided by the Cephissus River, whi
Demosthenes, Letters (ed. Norman W. DeWitt, Norman J. DeWitt), On Political Harmony (search)
ust not escape your attention either, which, though by themselves they are not sufficient to effect your purpose, yet when added to your military forces, will render all your aims much easier of accomplishment. To what, then, do I refer? Toward no city and toward none of the citizens in this or that city who have supported the existing orderThe cities of Greece were forced to set up pro-Macedonian governments after the battle of Chaeronea in 338 B.C. A Macedonian garrison was stationed in Thebes. Athens was less harshly treated but outspoken advocates of freedom were out of favour. must you harbor any bitternessThe verb pikrai/nesqai is cited as used by Demosthenes, Bekker, 1. p. 111. 31. or bear a grudge. Because the fear of such animosity causes those who are conscious of guilt in their own hearts, because necessary to the existing order and facing a manifest danger, to be zea
Demosthenes, Letters (ed. Norman W. DeWitt, Norman J. DeWitt), Concerning His Own Restoration (search)
are now compelled to do many things that are below the standard of those services of mine. In brief, however, the record upon which I passed scrutiny as your servant was of such a kind as to make you envied by all because of it and myself confident in the greatest rewards from you. And when Fortune, as irresistible as she was unkind, decided as she pleased, and not according to justice, the struggleThe reference is to the battle of Chaeronea, 338 B.C. for the liberty of Greece in which you engaged, not even in the times that followed did I retreat from my loyalty toward you, nor did I bargain for anything in place of it, no man's favour, no hopes of preferment, nor wealth, nor power, nor personal safety. Yet I observed that all these prizes were accruing to those who chose to play the game of politics to your detriment. Now one fact which is especially significant—alth
1 2 3 4 5 6 7