hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 1 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 1 1 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 42 results in 34 document sections:

1 2 3 4
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Smith, John 1579-1632 (search)
ned to Virginia. His labors there had been disinterested. Brave, honest, and true, he won the imperishable honor of being the first permanent planter of men of the Saxon race on the soil of the United States, and is entitled to the endearing name of Father of Virginia. Smith had made a rude map of his explorations in south Virginia; he afterwards explored the coasts of New England (1614), and made a map of the country between the Penobscot and Cape Cod. He started to found a colony there (1615), but failed. The remainder of his life was passed in retirement. He died in London, England, June 21, 1632. In 1864 a marble monument was erected to the memory of Captain Smith, on the Isles of Shoals, off the New England coast. It is placed on a pedestal of rough stone, and is situated on one of the highest eminences of Star Island. The three sides of the pillar are occupied by a lengthy eulogium on this hero of many adventures. Captain Smith published, in 1608, A true relation of Vir
and and found a settlement called St. Saviour......March, 1613 [They were soon expelled by the English from Virginia under Captain Argal as trespassers on English territory.] Capt. John Smith arrives at Monhegan from England. Building seven boats, he explores the coast from Penobscot to Cape Cod, and makes a map of it, to which Prince Charles assigned the name of New England......April, 1614 War, famine, and pestilence depopulate the Indian territories in Maine during the years......1615-18 Plymouth Company receives a new patent to lands between 40° and 48°, and in length by the same breadth throughout the mainland from sea to sea ......Nov. 3, 1620 Gorges and Capt. John Mason procure of the Plymouth council a patent of all the country between the Merrimac and Sagadahoc, from the Atlantic to the rivers Canada and Iroquois, which they called The province of Laconia ......Aug. 10, 1622 Permanent settlement made at Monhegan......1622 Permanent settlement at Saco.....
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Usher, Hezekiah 1615-1676 (search)
Usher, Hezekiah 1615-1676 Patriot; born in England about 1615; established himself in Boston in 1646; was agent for the Society for Propagating the Gospel; purchased the press and type for printing Eliot's Indian Bible in 1657; and was one of the founders of the Old South Church in 1669. He died in Boston, Mass., March 14, 1676. Patriot; born in Cambridge, Mass., June 6, 1639; son of the preceding; engaged in business in Boston. During the witchcraft excitement he was arrested but out 1615; established himself in Boston in 1646; was agent for the Society for Propagating the Gospel; purchased the press and type for printing Eliot's Indian Bible in 1657; and was one of the founders of the Old South Church in 1669. He died in Boston, Mass., March 14, 1676. Patriot; born in Cambridge, Mass., June 6, 1639; son of the preceding; engaged in business in Boston. During the witchcraft excitement he was arrested but allowed to escape. He died in Boston, Mass., July 11, 1679.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Waldron, Richard 1615- (search)
Waldron, Richard 1615- Military officer; born in Warwickshire, England, Sept. 2, 1615; came to Boston in 1635, and settled at Dover, N. H., in 1645. He represented that district from 1654 to 1676, and was seven years speaker. He was councillor and chief-justice, and in 1681 was president. Being chief military leader in that region, he took an active part in King Philip's War. Inviting Indians to Dover to treat with them, he seized several hundred of them, and hanged or sold into slavery 200. They fearfully retaliated thirteen years afterwards. Two apparently friendly Indians obtained a night's lodging at Waldron's house at Dover. At midnight they arose, opened the door, and admitted a party of Indians lying in wait. They seized Waldron, who, though seventy-four years of age, made stout resistance. They bound him in an arm-chair at the head of a table in the hall, when they taunted him, recalled his treachery, and tortured him to death, June 28, 1689.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wentworth, William 1615-1697 (search)
Wentworth, William 1615-1697 Colonist; born in Alford, England, in 1615; accompanied the Rev. John Wheelwright to Massachusetts in 1636 and was associated with him during his troubles with the Massachusetts government owing to his Antinomian beliefs. Later he settled in Dover, N. H., and afterwards preached in the church there. He was instrumental in rescuing a garrison from massacre by the Indians in 1689. It is said that all the Wentworths in the United States are his descendants. Hist; born in Alford, England, in 1615; accompanied the Rev. John Wheelwright to Massachusetts in 1636 and was associated with him during his troubles with the Massachusetts government owing to his Antinomian beliefs. Later he settled in Dover, N. H., and afterwards preached in the church there. He was instrumental in rescuing a garrison from massacre by the Indians in 1689. It is said that all the Wentworths in the United States are his descendants. He died in Dover, N. H., March 16, 1697.
as the case may be. Coffee is the berry of the Coffea Arabica, a shrub of the order rubiaccoe, and its fruit resembles the cherry. Bruce says that it is native in Abyssinia. The use of the infusion as a beverage cannot be traced back very far. It was carried by Selim from Egypt to Constantinople, but does not appear to have been publicly sold till 1554. Its use was forbidden by the mufti, but again permitted by an edict of Solyman the Great. The Venetians brought it from the Levant in 1615, and in 1645 it was introduced into Marseilles. Coffee was introduced into England by Daniel Edwards, a Turkey merchant, in 1657. The first coffee-house in England was in St. Michael's Alley, Cornhill, London; opened by Pasqua, a Greek servant of Mr. Edwards. It was then sold at from four to five guineas a pound. Coffee-trees were imported from Mocha by the Dutch about 1700, and thence carried to Surinam. In 1714 a coffee-plant was presented by the magistrates of Amsterdam to Louis XIV
f Metius. Borelli, about 1650, examined the question, and decided in favor of Jansen and Lippersheim. Porta is said to have hastened his death, which happened in 1615, by the fatigue and anxiety incurred in supporting his claims. Galileo had a hint of the invention, studied it out, and made a telescope which he soon put to use other so as to form a particular word or combination on which the lock has been set. It is mentioned in Beaumont and Fletcher's play of The Noble gentleman, 1615. A cap-case for your linen and your plate, With a strange lock that opens with A. M. E. N. Regnier, about the middle of the seventeenth century, made impre much esteemed, and the courier's dispatchboxes were fastened with them. They are, however, alluded to in Beaumont and Fletcher's The Noble gentleman, printed in 1615. See letter-lock, p. 1292. Carew, in some verses written five years later, has this reference:— As doeth a lock that goes With letters; for, till every one b
, is said to have been the Centinel of the Northwest territory, by William Maxwell, 1793. According to De Saint Foix, the earliest French newspaper, called the Gazette de France, was established by Renaudot, a physician, who obtained a royal grant of the exclusive privilege of publishing the same for himself and family. He had previously been in the habit of collecting information and circulating news-sheets among his patients. The first German newspaper was established at Frankfort in 1615. An illustrated war gazette, the Niewtijdinge, published in the Low Countries, had, however, preceded this by ten years. In Sweden, a newspaper was published as early as 1643, entitled the Ordinarie post Tidende. Journalism in Spain and Italy, owing to the lack of general education, and restrictions on the liberty of the press, has, until recently at least, remained in rather a backward state. In the former country newspapers issued at irregular intervals were published during the sev
ieces being fastened together by strips of the same plant. Several suspension-bridges, formed of iron chains supporting loops on which planking is laid, are mentioned by Hooker in his Himalaya journals. One crossed the Mywa, a western affluent of the Tambur in Nepal; another the Newa, in which the chains were clamped to the rocks on either shore, and the suspended loops occurred at intervals of 8 or 10 feet. Suspension-bridges in Europe are mentioned by Scamozzis in his Del idea Archi, 1615. The principles of their construction were laid down by Bernouilli (born at Bale, Switzerland, 1654; died in same city, 1705). The first chain-bridge in England appears to have been laid across the river Tees about the year 1741; its length was 70 feet, and breadth rather more than two; it was a mere foot-bridge, and seems to have been a very rude affair. Finlay constructed a chain-bridge in this country in 1796, over Jacob's Creek, between Uniontown and Greensburg, Pa., taking out a p
. 1706. He rem. to Stow. Holmes, Robert (otherwise written Holme, or Homes), was an early inhabitant, and by w. Jane, had Dorcas, b.—Aug. 1638, d. 1642; John,b.—Aug. 1639; Joseph, b. about 1641; Elizabeth,b. 2 Mar. 1643-4; Mehetabel, b. 16 Ap. 1615, bur. 14 Aug. 1645 Sarah,b. 13 Nov. 1646. d. 7 Nov. 1634; Ephraim, b. 8 Sept. 1647, bur. 8 May 1648 Samuel b. 3 Ap. 1653, d. 18 June 1653. Robert the f. res. of the southerly sidle of Brattle Street, not far from Appian Way. He d. 1663; his w. ecca, who m. Abraham Brown 1 May 1660; one of his daughters, perhaps Elizabeth, m. Samuel Shrimpton, as is manifest from his will, and the will of his son Hezekiah, in both of which the relationship is mentioned. Mr. Usher removed to Boston about 1615, and was Representative for Billerica three years, 1671-1673. Thomas (Hist. Printing, II. 409) says, Hezekiah Usher was the first bookseller in English America, of whom I can find any account. He d. May 1676. In his will, dated 11 May and prov
1 2 3 4