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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 6 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Richmond raid. (search)
Sheridan's Richmond raid. by Theo. F. Rodenbough, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. A. The Army of the Potomac had been hibernating on the left bank of the Rapidan River, when as the season for active operations was about to open (April, 1864) there arrived a lieutenant-general commanding and a chief of cavalry. The one was not unknown to fame; the other was almost an entire stranger to his new command. During the first two years of the war the Union cavalry lacked the paternal care essential to its proper development. Its first father was General Hooker, who organized a multitude of detachments into a compact army corps of 12,000 horsemen; transforming that which had been a by-word and a reproach into a force that, by its achievements in war, was ultimately to effect a radical change in the armament and use of mounted troops by the great military powers. The winter of 1863-64 brought little rest to the cavalry. While the artillery and infantry were comfortably quartered,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cavalry operations in the West under Rosecrans and Sherman. (search)
Georgia. Also Colonel Long, with a small force, defeated General Wheeler at Calhoun, Tennessee, December 27th. During the winter the cavalry was principally at Athens, Tennessee, under General Elliott. On the 11th of February, 1864, General Sooy Smith started from Memphis with a mounted force of seven thousand men to cooperate with Sherman in eastern Mississippi. The expedition proved a failure, and returned to Memphis. [See foot-note, p. 247, and article, p. 416.] In March and April, 1864, Forrest advanced from Mississippi with a large force, and passed through western Tennessee to Paducah, Kentucky. Returning, he reached Fort Pillow on the morning of April 12th, and captured the fort. [See p. 418.] Forrest was pursued by General S. D. Sturgis from Memphis, but turned upon him, and signally defeated him at Brice's Cross Roads on the 10th of June, and pursued him back to Memphis. [See p. 420.] On the 14th of July Forrest was in turn defeated near Tupelo by A. J. Smith.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of New Market, Va., May 15th, 1864. (search)
g too far from it. In December, 1863, General Averell made a daring raid from New Creek with about four thousand cavalry. We prevented his getting into the Shenandoah Valley to strike at Staunton. But in shying him off from that point we caused him to sweep on behind the North Mountain range, where he struck the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad sixty odd miles west of Lynchburg, and destroyed the army stores accumulated there, and then made his escape back to his base. By the month of April, 1864, information reached us that General Sigel had established himself at Winchester, and was preparing for a forward movement with over eight thousand infantry, twenty-five hundred cavalry, and three or four field-batteries. On the 2d of May I broke camp at Mount Crawford, in Rockingham County, something over seventy miles from Winchester, and moved to meet Sigel and find out as far as possible his strength and designs and report the facts to General Lee. I had with me the 62d Virginia Inf
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Operations South of the James River. (search)
Operations South of the James River. I. First attempts to capture Petersburg. By August V. Kautz, Brevet Major-General, U. S. A. The Cavalry Division of the Army. of the James was organized in the last days of April, 1864. Through the personal application of Lieutenant-General Grant I was selected and promoted to be Brigadier-General of Volunteers to organize and command it. I found the troops of which it was to be made up encamped in rear of Portsmouth, Va., picketing the line of the expeditions of the enemy. This was accomplished at a cost in my division of 719 killed, wounded, and missing. . . . editors. Ii. Repelling the first assault on Petersburg. By R. E. Colston, Brigadier-General, C. S. A. at the end of April, 1864, I was transferred from the Department of Georgia to that of Virginia and was assigned by General H. A. Wise to the provisional command of the post of Petersburg, which I had already held from January to March, 1863. General Wise returned to P
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 2: Lee's invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. (search)
, were they immediately to enter into negotiations with the great powers of Europe, for the purpose of obtaining the acknowledgment by them of the independence of the Confederate States of North America. and these culminated in the spring of 1864 in the formation of a Southern Independence Association, with a British peer (Lord Wharncliffe) as President, and a membership composed of powerful representatives of the Church, State, and Trade. This association was formed in Manchester in April, 1864, and the announcement of its organization, together with a list of its officers and members, was published in the Manchester Guardian on the 9th of that month. Nearly nine hundred names appeared in the list, representing the highest and most influential classes in England — members of the House of Lords, and of the House of Commons, not a few; baronets, clergymen, lawyers, magistrates, and merchants, prominent in all parts of the country, and representing immense wealth and social and po
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 9: the Red River expedition. (search)
General Grant, already alluded to, concerning General Sherman's troops, See page 255. and he determined to go on to Alexandria so soon as the Eastport should be raised and the fleet be enabled to proceed. The Eastport floated on the 21st, April, 1864. and on that day orders were issued for the army to move; and before dawn the next morning, two divisions, the cavalry under General Arnold, and the artillery under Captain Classon, the whole commanded by General Emory, were on their way toware latter was charged with the arduous duty of covering the retreat to Alexandria. He was hotly pressed, and compelled to skirmish with the foe hovering on flank and rear, almost from the beginning of the march; and, on the morning of the 23d, April 1864. he had a severe engagement near Clouterville, on the Cane River, where he formed a battle-line, with General Mower on his right. Smith gallantly and skillfully conducted the engagement for about three hours, when the Confederates, repulsed at
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant, II. (search)
he man. I think we'll try him a little longer. Finally comes the renowned remark, when they tell him of Grant's intemperance: I wish I knew what brand of whiskey he drinks. I would send a barrel to all my other generals. Sherman felt the power near at hand, as he fought under Grant, and wrote to him that it was something which he could liken to nothing else than the faith a Christian has in his Saviour. Through this faith, then, the obscure man from Galena began in April, 1861, and by April, 1864, was the will-power of his country. But why was such a man still obscure at the age of thirty-nine? Again his own words give the fundamental explanation: As I grow older, I become more indolent, my besetting sin through life. This was written in 1873 to his minister to England, and no truer word ever came from him. Together with the remark about taking Richmond, it reveals the foundation upon which the whole man was built. Great will and great indolence met about equally in Grant; t
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant, V. (search)
concise, and, if delivered, would have been all that the occasion required. I could not help laughing at a scene so characteristic of the man tho whom all had turned as the only one to guide the nation in a war that had become painfully critical. So now he faced the conclusion. From Cairo in 1861 to Chattanooga in 1863 he had marched forward, narrowing the Confederacy blow after blow. Here, between Washington and Richmond — only a hundred mils — blow afer blow had narrowed nothing. In April, 1864, they stood as they had started in April, 1861. Richmond was still to be taken, Lee still to be crushed. Three years, six generals, and a loss of one hundred and forty-four thousand men had failed to do this. From such failure Grant received two great inheritances, and with them succeeded. His inheritances were to have his own way unhampered and the control of a perfect instrument, the army of the Potomac under General Meade. Grant's detractors lay too much stress on the first inher
By this accession, the Second Corps attained in April, 1864, an aggregate strength of 46,363, with 28,854 prehich some of the regiments suffered terribly. In April, 1864, the Tenth Corps was ordered to Virginia, where ihin the previous experience of the command. In April, 1864, the two divisions of the Eleventh Corps were broant its flag on the summit of the mountain. In April, 1864, the designation of the corps was changed to that accompanied Banks on his Red River Expedition of April, 1864. General McClernand was again in command of the cdivision served on Banks' Red River Expedition in April, 1864, the six regiments — formed into two brigades — bntry, and some skirmishing at the outposts. In April, 1864, the corps was concentrated at Yorktown, preparatthe reorganization of the Army of the Potomac, in April, 1864, Major-General Philip H. Sheridan was placed in ccavalry attached to Banks's Red River Expedition, April, 1864, was commanded by General Albert L. Lee, and comp
t only eight companies were organized up to April, 1864. These companies left the State April 28, ansfer of the Third Corps to the Second, in April, 1864, the brigade was placed in Mott's (4th) Divth, 125th and 126th, to which were added in April, 1864, the 52d and 57th; and, later on, the 7th Nmarble statute of their heroic colonel. In April, 1864, the Third Corps was ordered discontinued, in that battle, 6 killed and 32 wounded. In April, 1864, the corps number was changed to the TwentiFifth Corps, to which it was transferred in April, 1864. On joining the Fifth Corps, it was assignjoined the Army of the James at Yorktown in April, 1864, just prior to its departure for Bermuda Hue, where it fought at Missionary Ridge. In April, 1864, the Eleventh was transferred to Hooker's nquent march to the relief of Knoxville. In April, 1864, it was transferred to Robinson's (3d) Brign the discontinuance of the Third Corps, in April, 1864, this division was transferred to the Sixth[18 more...]
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