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Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 3 3 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 3 3 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 2 2 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 1 1 Browse Search
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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
5,919 17,287 Sept. 19-20, 1863. Chickamauga 1,656 9,749 4,774 16,179 June 1-4, 1864. Cold Harbor 1,844 9,077 1,816 12,737 Dec. 11-14, 1862. Fredericksburg 1,284 9,600 1,769 12,653 Aug. 28-30, 1862. Manassas Including Chantilly, Rappahannock, Bristoe Station, and Bull Run Bridge. 1,747 8,452 4,263 14,462 April 6-7, 1862. Shiloh 1,754 8,408 2,885 13,047 Dec. 31, 1862. Stone's River Including Knob Gap, and losses on January 1st and 2d. 1863. 1,730 7,802 3,717 13,249 June 15-19, 1864. Petersburg (Assault) 1,688 8,513 1,185 11,386 As before, the missing includes the captured; but the number missing at Fredericksburg and Cold Harbor may be fairly added to the killed and wounded, as it represents men who fell in an unsuccessful assault. In connection with these matters the question naturally arises,--Which were victories, and which were defeats? To answer fairly and without prejudice would only invite bitter and senseless criticism from both sides. It
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
But Butler did not rise to the occasion; he sent only part of his forces, under Baldy Smith, who had reinforced Butler, which captured some strong outer fortifications but which did not advance on the city, although it was feebly garrisoned. When Grant and Meade arrived, the town had been reinforced. The attacks of June 16, 17, and 18 were repulsed with great loss to the Union forces. No new assaults were ordered, and the investment of Petersburg began.] Headquarters Army of Potomac June 15, 1864 Of course, the first thing was to visit the great bridge. The approach to it lay along the river border, under the bank, and had been prepared with much labor, for, a day or two previous, it had been covered with great cypresses, some of them at least three and a half feet in diameter, and these had to be cut close to the ground, and the debris carefully cleared away; in a portion of the road too there was a muddy swamp, which had to be laboriously spanned by a causeway; but there wa
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 15: operations of the Army of the James around Richmond and Petersburg. (search)
nowledge of the topography he held the key to Petersburg. True, he did; but what is the use of holding the key when you have not the courage to turn it in the lock? Smith's curse was that he had graduated as a topographical engineer,--that is, a picture drawer or map maker,--and he was continually making maps before he made his assaults. I sent him word again to go in with Hancock and he had the mendacity to send me the following despatch:-- Cobb's Hill signal Station, 12 P. M. June 15, 1864. General Butler: It is impossible for me to go further to-night, but unless I misapprehend the topography, I hold the key to Petersburg. General Hancock not yet up; General Ames not here; General Brooks has three batteries; General Martindale one, and General Hinks ten light guns. W. F. Smith, Major-General. But my staff officer had seen Smith and Hancock talking together. Smith got Hancock at nine o'clock at night to relieve his own men from their position in the fortificati
us a heavy movable column for attack or defence under a general who obeys orders without excessive reconnoitring. . . . C. A. Dana. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. War Records, Vol. XXXI., Part I., p. 85. [no. 66. see page 687.] June 15, 1864, 7.20 P. M. General Smith: I grieve for the delays. Time is the essence of this movement. I doubt not the delays were necessary, but now push and get the Appomattox between you and me. Nothing has passed down the railroad to harm you yeting. [no. 67. see page 690.] New York, Dec. 7, 1891. Maj.-Gen. Benj. F. Butler, Lowell, Mass: My Dear General:--In response to your request that I should put in writing a statement as to my action as one of your staff officers on the 15th of June, 1864, in connection with the movement upon Petersburg by a portion of the Army of the James upon that day, I have the honor to say:-- Gen. Win. T. Smith ( Baldy Smith), commanding the Eighteenth Army Corps of the Army of the James, was ordere
on the same footing as white troops. From the first of January, 1864, colored volunteers in the loyal States, under the call of the seventeenth of October, 1863, were allowed the same bounty as white volunteers; and all colored soldiers free on the nineteenth of April, 1861, were to receive full pay; and the Attorney-General was authorized to decide whether colored men not free on the nineteenth of April were entitled to the same pay as white soldiers. The bill was approved on the fifteenth of June, 1864. No. Lxvii.--The Bill to increase the Pay of Soldiers in the United States Army, and for other purposes. In the Senate, on the fourteenth of December, 1863, Mr. Wilson, of Massachusetts, introduced a bill to increase the bounty to volunteers and the pay of the army, which was referred to the Committee on Military Affairs, and reported back by Mr. Wilson on the sixteenth, with amendments. The bill provided that there should be paid to such persons as had enlisted under the pro
lson's and Crawford's Cav.; Confed., detachments of the Army of Northern Virginia. Losses: Union, 50 killed, 250 wounded. June 14, 1864: Lexington, Mo. Union, Detachment 1st Mo. Cav. Losses: Union, 8 killed, 1 wounded. June 15, 1864: Samaria Church, Malvern Hill, Va. Union, Wilson's Cav.; Confed., Hampton's Cav. Losses: Union, 25 killed, 3 wounded; Confed., 100 killed and wounded. June 15-19, 1864: Petersburg, Va., commencement of the siege that continuJune 15-19, 1864: Petersburg, Va., commencement of the siege that continued to its fall (April 2, 1865). Union, Tenth and Eighteenth Corps, Army of the James, Maj.-Gen. B. F. Butler; Second, Fifth, Sixth, and Ninth Corps, Army of the Potomac, Maj.-Gen. Geo. G. Meade; Confed., Gen. Beauregard's command, reenforced by two divisions of Lee's army on June 18th. Losses: Union, 1688 killed, 8513 wounded, 1185 missing; Confed. (estimate), 5000 killed, wounded, and missing. June 16, 1864: Otter Creek, near liberty, Va. Union, Hunter's command in advanc
ompanying troops were practically unlimited as to variety and amount. But with the material taken into the field with troops, considerations of transportation A hospital on the firing-line Confederate Camp in front of Petersburg, captured June 15, 1864 This abandoned Confederate Camp fell into Federal hands June 15, 1864. It was used by the Union troops as a temporary hospital and camp. Three assaults had been made on Petersburg before this photograph was taken, June 24, 1864. The manJune 15, 1864. It was used by the Union troops as a temporary hospital and camp. Three assaults had been made on Petersburg before this photograph was taken, June 24, 1864. The man with his arm in the sling is evidently one of the slightly wounded who was sent to this field hospital. It was not long before these rough shelters gave place to bomb-proofs and burrows. As the siege progressed the soldiers on both sides lived subterranean lives. Nothing was safe above ground within range of musketry fire. Even the resting-camps in which the relieving regiments took turns had to be heavily protected from dropping shells and long-range fire. It was in such exposed position
ompanying troops were practically unlimited as to variety and amount. But with the material taken into the field with troops, considerations of transportation A hospital on the firing-line Confederate Camp in front of Petersburg, captured June 15, 1864 This abandoned Confederate Camp fell into Federal hands June 15, 1864. It was used by the Union troops as a temporary hospital and camp. Three assaults had been made on Petersburg before this photograph was taken, June 24, 1864. The manJune 15, 1864. It was used by the Union troops as a temporary hospital and camp. Three assaults had been made on Petersburg before this photograph was taken, June 24, 1864. The man with his arm in the sling is evidently one of the slightly wounded who was sent to this field hospital. It was not long before these rough shelters gave place to bomb-proofs and burrows. As the siege progressed the soldiers on both sides lived subterranean lives. Nothing was safe above ground within range of musketry fire. Even the resting-camps in which the relieving regiments took turns had to be heavily protected from dropping shells and long-range fire. It was in such exposed position
Mine Run, Va., Nov. 27–Dec. 1, 18631731,0993811,65311057065745 Pleasant Hill, La., Apr. 9, 18641508443751,3699874,7205,707 Wilderness, Va., May 5-7, 18642,24612,1373,38317,666Reports of losses not complete Spotsylvania, Va., May 10, 18647533,3474,100Reports incomplete Spotsylvania, Va., May 12, 18646,0208006,820Records of losses not shown Drewry's Bluff, Va., May 12-16, 18643902,3801,3904,160Reports incomplete Cold Harbor, Va., June 1-3, 186412,000Reports incomplete Petersburg, Va., June 15-30, 18642,0139,9354,62116,569Estimated loss in Hill's Corps and Field and Kershaw's divisions, 2,970 Atlanta Campaign, Ga., May, 1864 (including Buzzard's Roost, Snake Creek Gap and New Hope Church)1,0581,2402,298Killed and wounded, 9,187 Assault on Kenesaw Mt., Ga., June 27, 18641,999522,051270172342 Tupelo, Miss., July 13-15, 186477559386742101,1161,326 Atlanta, Ga., July 22, 1864 (Hood's attack)4301,5991,7333,7222,8902,8908513,741 Jonesboro, Ga., Aug. 31, 18641791,640 Jonesboro, Ga
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Southern Confederacy. (search)
rom July 20, 1861, to Aug. 22, 1861; fourth, from Nov. 18, 1861, to Feb. 17, 1862. Under the permanent constitution, which provided for twenty-six Senators and 106 members of the House of Representatives, there were two congresses. The first held four sessions: First, from Feb. 18 to April 26, 1862; second, from Aug. 12 to Oct. 13, 1862; third, from Jan. 12 to May 8, 1863; fourth, from Dec. 7, 1863, to Feb. 18, 1864. The second congress held two sessions: First, from May 2 to June 15, 1864; second, from Nov. 7, 1864, to March 18, 1865. Constitution of the Confederate States of America. We, the people of the Confederate States, each State acting in its sovereign and independent character, in order to form a permanent federal government, establish justice, insure domestic tranquillity, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity—invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God —do ordain and establish this constitution for the Confederate States o
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