Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1868 AD or search for 1868 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 299 results in 251 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arkansas, (search)
to 1848 John S. Roane1848 to 1852 Elias N. Conway1852 to 1860 Henry M. Rector1860 to 1862 Harris Flanagin1862 to 1864 Isaac Murphy1864 to 1868 Powell Clayton1868 to 1871 Orzo H. Hadley1871 to 1872 Elisha Baxter1872 to 1874 Augustus H. Garland1874 to 1876 Wm. R. Miller1877 to 1881 Thos. J. Churchill1881 to 1883 Jas. H.to 1853 Wm. K. Sebastian30th to 36th1848 to 1861 Robert W. Johnston33d to 36th1853 to 1861 37th, 38th, and 39th Congresses vacant. Alexander McDonald40th to 42d1868 to 1871 Benj. F. Rice40th to 43d1868 to 1873 Powell Clayton42d to 45th1871 to 1877 Stephen W. Dorsey44th to 46th1873 to 1879 Augustus H. Garland45th to 49th187acant. Alexander McDonald40th to 42d1868 to 1871 Benj. F. Rice40th to 43d1868 to 1873 Powell Clayton42d to 45th1871 to 1877 Stephen W. Dorsey44th to 46th1873 to 1879 Augustus H. Garland45th to 49th1877 to 1885 James D. Walker46th to 49th1879 to 1885 James K. Jones49th to----1885 to---- James H. Berry49th to----1885 to----
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Armstrong, Samuel Chapman, 1839-1893 (search)
Armstrong, Samuel Chapman, 1839-1893 Founder of the Hampton Normal and Industrial Institute; born in Wailuku, Hawaii, in 1839. He was educated in Oahu College, Honolulu, and Williams College (U. S.), where he was graduated in 1862; fought with distinction in the Civil War, and afterwards became interested in the education of poor colored people; and founded Hampton Institute in 1868. After ten years of successful administration, the government arranged to have Indian children admitted in 1878, and since that time the school has successfully taught members of both races. He died in 1893. army
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baker, Lafayette C., 1826-1868 (search)
Baker, Lafayette C., 1826-1868 Detective; born in Stafford, N. Y., Oct. 13, 1826: was a member of the vigilance committee in San Francisco in 1856. offered his services to the federal government in 1861; and was sent to Richmond, where he succeeded in collecting much information, and returned to Washington within a month. While in Richmond, he was arrested and imprisoned as a spy, and had several interviews with the President of the Confederacy. When the secret-service bureau was transferred to the War Department, he was appointed its chief, with the rank of colonel, and subsequently was promoted brigadier-general. When president Lincoln was shot by Booth, General Baker organized pursuit, and was present at Booth's capture and death. He published History of the United States secret service. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., July 2, 1868.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bancroft, George, (search)
e University of Oxford conferred upon him the honorary degree of Doctor of Civil Law. During this residence in Europe he perfected his collection of materials for his history, visiting the public archives and libraries at Paris. Returning to the United States in 1849, he made his residence in New York City, where he prosecuted his historical labors. He was engaged in this work until 1867, when he was appointed, by President Johnson (May 14), minister to Prussia, and accepted the office. In 1868 he was accredited to the North German Confederation, and in 1871 to the German Empire. In August, 1868, Mr. Bancroft received from the University of Bonn the honorary degree of Doctor Juris ; and in 1870 he celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of the reception of his first degree at Gottingen. Mr. Bancroft was a contributor of numerous essays to the North American review. In 1889 he published Martin Van Buren to the end of his public career, which he had written many years before. His Hist
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baraga, Frederick, 1797-1868 (search)
Baraga, Frederick, 1797-1868 Clergyman; born in Carniola, Austria, June 29, 1797; in 1830 determined to devote his life to the conversion of Indians in the United States; settled among the Ottawas in Michigan. In 1856 he was appointed Bishop of Marquette. In addition to translating prayer-books, hymn-books, catechisms, etc., into the Indian language, he wrote in German the History, character, manners, and customs of the North American Indians. He died in Marquette, Mich., Jan. 19, 1868.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barlow, Francis Channing, 1834-1896 (search)
, and he commanded a division in the battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863. He was wounded at Gettysburg, and was also distinguished in the Richmond campaign in 1864. He rendered essential service in the final struggle that ended with the surrender of Lee; was mustered out of the service in 1865 with the rank of major-general; was secretary of state of New York in 1865-68; United States marshal in 1868-69; and attorney-general of New York in 1871-73. He died in New York City, Jan. 11, 1896., and he commanded a division in the battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863. He was wounded at Gettysburg, and was also distinguished in the Richmond campaign in 1864. He rendered essential service in the final struggle that ended with the surrender of Lee; was mustered out of the service in 1865 with the rank of major-general; was secretary of state of New York in 1865-68; United States marshal in 1868-69; and attorney-general of New York in 1871-73. He died in New York City, Jan. 11, 1896.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battle, Kemp Plummer, 1831- (search)
Battle, Kemp Plummer, 1831- Educator; born in Franklin county, N. C., Dec. 19, 1831; was graduated at the University of North Carolina in 1849; member of the Confederate Convention of that State in 1861; State Treasurer in 1866-68; was president of the University of North Carolina in 1876-91: then resigned to become Professor of History in the same institution. He is author of History of the Supreme Court of North Carolina; History of Raleigh, North Carolina: trials and judicial proceedings of the New Testament; Life of General Jethro Sumner, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bell, Charles H., 1798-1875 (search)
Bell, Charles H., 1798-1875 Naval officer; born in New York, Aug. 15, 1798; entered the naval service in June, 1812; served with Decatur in 1813-14; with Chauncey, on Lake Ontario, in 1814; and with Decatur again, in the Mediterranean, in 1815. He was with the squadron in the West Indies (1824-29) operating against the pirates there. In 1860 he was in command of the Norfolk navy-yard: commanded the Pacific squadron in 1862-64, and the navy-yard at Brooklyn 1865-68. In July, 1866, he was made a rear-admiral. he died in New Brunswick, N. J., Feb. 19, 1875.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bellows, Henry Whitney, 1814- (search)
Bellows, Henry Whitney, 1814- Clergyman; born in Boston, June 11, 1814. Educated at Harvard and the Divinity School at Cambridge, he was ordained pastor of the first Unitarian Church in New York City in January, 1838. he remained its pastor Henry Whitney Bellows, D. D. until his death, Jan. 30, 1882. He was the projector of the Christian inquirer, in 1843, and he occupied from the beginning a conspicuous place in the pulpit, in letters, and in social life, wielding great influence for good. Dr. Bellows was one of the originators of the United States Sanitary commission (q. v.), which performed such prodigious benevolent work during the late Civil War. He was president of the Commission from the beginning. Besides numerous pamphlets and published discourses. Dr. Bellows was the author of a collection of sermons on Christian doctrine, published in 1869; and later he gave a picturesque account of a European tour in 1868-69, in 2 volumes, entitled The old world in its New face.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bering sea arbitration. (search)
n coasts, with greater slaughter of the herd, and with occasional incursions into Bering Sea. There was gradually developed a contention that the principle laid down by Secretary Bout-well did not apply to Bering Sea, because Russia had claimed and enforced exclusive jurisdiction over all its waters, that it had been acquiesced in by the maritime nations, including G/un>reat Britain, and that all the rights of Russia therein passed to the United States by the cession. The act of Congress of 1868 (Section 1,9)56) made it unlawful to kill seals within the limits of Alaska Territory or in the waters thereof, and it was claimed that the waters of Alaska embraced all that portion of Bering Sea east of the line designated in the Russian treaty of cession. Under the foregoing construction of the treaty and the statute, the first seizure of British vessels in Bering Sea took place under instructions of the Secretary of the Treasury by the revenue vessels in 1886, and other seizures followed
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...