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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 1 1 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
s during the horrors of the middle passage. Co-operating with this group were Samuel Gompers, the labour leader, Edward Atkinson, statistician, Professor Sumner, David Starr Jordan, President of Leland Stanford University, and Andrew Carnegie. by the postmaster at San Francisco of three pamphlets addressed to members of the Philippine Commission, written by Edward Atkinson. These were entitled The cost of a national crime, The hell of War and its Penalties, and Criminal aggression; by wential columns of the Tribune to this movement, showed his interest in the general subject by writing an introduction to Atkinson's Principles of political economy (1843). He soon became more interested in the problems of protection and free land, edistory of economic literature, conspired to limit his influence within narrow circles. Much the same may be said of Edward Atkinson (1827– 1905), whose chief contributions were a Report on the Cotton manufacture (1863), Revenue reform (1871), The d
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
As a man thinks, 283 Asmus, Georg, 583 Aspinwall, Thomas, 183 Association, 437 Association discussed, 437 Astor, J. J., 452 Athanasius, 231 Atharva-Veda-Praticakhya, 468 Atharva-Veda-Sanhita;, 468 Athenian Mercury, 334 Atkinson, Edward, 363, 437, 440 Atlantic Monthly, 5, 36, 57, 66 n., 77, 78, 80, 103, 122, 141, 301, 304, 305-307, 312, 314, 316, 318, 482 n., 488, 496 At the funeral of a minor poet, 37 Aubert Dubayet, 598 Auctioneer, the, 281 Audrey, 287 Audubf criticism, 57 Principles of currency, 438 Principles of economics (Seligman), 443 Principles of economics (Taussig), 443 Principles of free trade, the, 438 Principles of money and banking, the, 440 Principles of political economy (Atkinson), 437 Principles of political economy (Bowen), 435 Principles of political economy (Newcomb), 440 Principles of political economy (Vethake), 434 Principles of psychology (James), 250, 254, 421 Principles of psychology (Thornd
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, Note (search)
cript are reprinted by permission from a work called Book and heart, by Thomas Wentworth Higginson, copyright, 1897, by Harper and Brothers, with whose consent the essay entitled One of Thackeray's women also is published. Leave has been obtained to reprint the papers on Brown, Cooper, and Thoreau, from Carpenter's American prose, copyrighted by the Macmillan Company, 1898. My thanks are also due to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences for permission to reprint the papers on Scudder, Atkinson, and Cabot; to the proprietors of Putnam's magazine for the paper entitled Emerson's foot-note person ; to the proprietors of the New York Evening post for the article on George Bancroft from The nation ; to the editor of the Harvard graduates' magazine for the paper on Gottingen and Harvard ; and to the editors of the Outlook for the papers on Charles Eliot Norton, Julia Ward Howe, Edward Everett Hale, William J. Rolfe, and Old Newport days. Most of the remaining sketches appeared origina
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 18 (search)
XVII. Edward Atkinson. Edward Atkinson, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences since March 12, 1879, was born in Brookline, Massachusetts, on February 10, 1827, and died in BostEdward Atkinson, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences since March 12, 1879, was born in Brookline, Massachusetts, on February 10, 1827, and died in Boston on December 11, 1905. He was descended on his father's side from the patriot minute-man, Lieutenant Amos Atkinson, and on the maternal side from Stephen Greenleaf, a well-known fighter of Indianson, had received, a Harvard College education, a training which was also extended to all of Edward Atkinson's sons, at a later day. At fifteen he entered the employment of Read and Chadwick, Commissitory. It seemed to Mr. Atkinson, at any rate, his crowning work. The books published by Edward Atkinson were the following: The distribution of Profits, 1885; The industrial progress of the natiowed a century hence, it is doubtful whether a more substantial and varied list will be found credited to the memory of any one in America than that which attaches to the memory of Edward Atkinson.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 45: an antislavery policy.—the Trent case.—Theories of reconstruction.—confiscation.—the session of 1861-1862. (search)
er wrote to Mr. Bright from Boston, August 5:— I wish I could sit by the seashore and talk with you again. It is hard to write of events and of persons with that fulness and frankness which you require. The letters which I enclose from Mr. Atkinson, Edward Atkinson, of Boston. a most intelligent and excellent person, will let you see the chance of cotton from the South. Do not count upon it. Make your calculations as if it were beyond reach. His plan of opening Texas reads well on pEdward Atkinson, of Boston. a most intelligent and excellent person, will let you see the chance of cotton from the South. Do not count upon it. Make your calculations as if it were beyond reach. His plan of opening Texas reads well on paper; but thus far we have lost by dividing our forces. We must concentrate and crush. The armies of the South must be met and annihilated. If we start an expedition to Texas there will be another division. Climate, too, will be for the present against us. The correspondence between General Butler and Mr. Johnson will show you that government puts no restraint upon the sale of cotton; it is the perverseness of the rebels that does it all. Congress has adjourned. After a few days in Wash
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, chapter 10 (search)
ake a new issue of currency for the purpose. The speech caused general alarm for the safety of the national honor. Edward Atkinson, of Boston, wrote to Sumner, February 29: Sherman's speech has created more distrust here than anything that has yet taken place. Mr. Atkinson contributed a series of papers to the New York Evening Post, which were published in a pamphlet, with the title Senator Sherman's Fallacies. William Endicott, Jr., of the same city, wrote the same day, invoking Sumner towould be an inexcusable perfidy should we break this solemn engagement. On technical points he had excellent advisers in Atkinson and Endicott, both experts in finance, and distinguished for disinterested patriotism. It was a characteristic of Sumnehis house. His colored friend, J. B. Smith, gave him a dinner, with Rev. Dr. Potter of New York, Moses Kimball, and Edward Atkinson among the guests. Sumner wrote to Whittier, November 13:— Last evening I was told that you were in Boston,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 57: attempts to reconcile the President and the senator.—ineligibility of the President for a second term.—the Civil-rights Bill.—sale of arms to France.—the liberal Republican party: Horace Greeley its candidate adopted by the Democrats.—Sumner's reserve.—his relations with Republican friends and his colleague.—speech against the President.—support of Greeley.—last journey to Europe.—a meeting with Motley.—a night with John Bright.—the President's re-election.—1871-1872. (search)
of the colored people, whose solid Republican column at the South it was important to break. Accordingly, for six weeks before the meeting of the convention its promoters plied the senator with appeals for a public statement of his position, which were so near in date and so alike in substance as to suggest concert among the writers. Among them were Whitelaw Reid of the New York Tribune, Horace White of the Chicago Tribune, Samuel Bowles of the Springfield Republican, Francis W. Bird, Edward Atkinson, David A. Wells, Hiram Barney, George Wilkes, and J. R. Doolittle; and they were reinforced by others who joined in a similar pressure at Washington. They set forth with great urgency the necessity of his taking a stand openly in order to save the new movement at its birth; and they added the personal appeal that one of its inspirations was the indignation felt at the outrage inflicted on him by the President and his partisans in his removal from his committee. Mr. Reid wrote with muc
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
es slipped and the careless hackman on my right let me fall, Frank catching me, but not until I had given my knee a severe wrench which gave me great pain. I suffered much in my travel, but got through, Frank helping me. ... My knee seemed much inflamed and kept me awake much of the night. My lecture on Polite Society was well received. The good people of the house brought me their new ledger, that my name might be the first recorded in it. February 12. Dinner of Merchants' Club. Edward Atkinson invites me. Got back by early train, 7.50 A. M., feeling poorly. Did not let Maud know of my hurt. Went to the dinner mentioned above, which was at the Vendome.... Was taken in to dinner by the President, Mr. Fitz. Robert Collyer had the place on my right. He was delightful as ever. Edward Everett Hale sat near me and talked with me from time to time. Of course my speech afflicted me. I got through it, however, but had to lose the other speeches, the hour being so late and the nigh
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
pasteboard box held one stanza, the cover of a Tauchnitz the others. September 18. Heard to-day of the noble poet, Whittier's death. What a great heart is gone with him! September 22. Liverpool. Embarked at about ten in the morning. Edward Atkinson, wife and daughter on board, a valuable addition to our resources. September 29. At sea. I said in my mind: There is nothing in me which can redeem me from despair over my poor life and wasted opportunities. That redemption which I seekt must have positive ground. I wrote some lines in which a bit of sea-weed shining in the sun seemed as an illustration of the light which I hope to gain. September 30. A performance of Jarley's Waxworks in the evening was much enjoyed. Edward Atkinson as Mrs. Partington in my witch hat recited some merry nonsense of Hood's about European travel. October 2. Boston. In the early morning John M. Forbes's yacht, the Wild Duck, hovered around us, hoping to take off his daughter, Mrs. Russe
I, 5. Arnold, Matthew, II, 87. Arthur, Chester A., II, 101. Ascension Church, I, 70. Assiout, II, 36. Association for the Advancement of Women, I, 361, 373-76, 383, 384; II, 29, 58, 73, 84, 90, 91, 95, 97, 98, 131, 141, 152, 162, 178, 180, 183, 199, 200, 207, 209, 268. Astor, Emily, See Ward. Astor, John, I, 121. Astor, Wm. B., I, 57, 99. Athens, I, 273, 274, 275, 278, 287; II, 43, 243. Athens Museum, II, 43. Atherstone, I, 97, 280. Athol, I, 119. Atkinson, Edward, II, 62, 177. Atlanta, II, 207, 208. Atlantic, II, 75. Atlantic Monthly, I, 176, 188; II, 295. Augusta, Empress, II, 22. Austria, I, 94. Authors' Club, Boston, II, 270, 271, 320, 334, 340, 341, 354, 357. Avignon, I, 97. Babcock, Mrs. C. A., II, 215. Bacon, Gorham, II, 49. Baddeley, Mr., II, 246. Baez, Buenaventura, I, 323, 325, 328, 329, 334. Bailey, Jacob, I, 37, 52. Bairam, feast of, II, 34. Baker, Lady, I, 267. Baker, Sir, Samuel, I, 266.
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