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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 17 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 10 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 10 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 8 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 5 1 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 2 Browse Search
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John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Chapter 4: pictures of the struggle (search)
nature, to his tactics and to his genius. Dr. Channing had been a family friend of the Mays, and hvisit in Boston, I spent several hours with Dr. Channing in earnest conversation upon Abolitionism acomplain of us because we do no better. Dr. Channing, I continued with increased earnestness, itr made to another; and the figures of May and Channing seem to stand as in a bas-relief symbolizing onalism and the fountains of morality were by Channing turned upon the entire subject. This was no half-work: it was thorough. Channing's name carried the book into houses, both at the North and in ance to posterity, however, is that it proves Channing's courage, and shows that his occasional subsitionists were, of course, not satisfied with Channing's pamphlet; for he could not sanction their vtheir Boston friends were cut to the heart by Channing's essay. They denounced him as an even more son. If, at times, we feel dissatisfied with Channing's caution, we should remember that he was a m[3 more...]
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Chapter 5: the crisis (search)
Garrison should be silenced, because he was a fanatic; but before long they were demanding that the Abolitionists should be hanged, and were mingling the name of Channing in their execrations. In the beginning they demanded only to be let alone; but before long they were swearing that the South should buy and sell slaves underneunderstand and to resist the advance of slavery as Lovejoy's murder. The Abolitionists of Boston immediately sought Faneuil Hall, which was at first refused. Dr. Channing, heading the free-speech movement, joined with the Abolitionists in claiming the right to use the Hall. It was felt that the great public was behind this claia letter written by one of them, a woman, to a friend in England. Stout men, my husband for instance, came home that day and lifted up their voices and wept. Dr. Channing did not know how dangerous an experiment, as people count danger, he adventured. We knew that we must send our children out of town and sleep in our day garme
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Chapter 7: the man of action (search)
led extravagant. They are appalling. They are magnificent. And they came much nearer to expressing the general opinion of the country in 1842 than the milder words quoted above came to expressing the contemporary opinion of 1832. Education was marching, the case was beginning to be understood. Within three years after Garrison's denunciation of the Constitution as an agreement with Hell, the Annexation of Texas brought thousands of the most conservative minds in the country, including Channing, to the point of abandoning the Constitution; and when in 1854 Garrison publicly burned the Constitution on the Fourth of July, the incident was of slight importance. Civil War was already inevitable: the dragon's teeth had been sown: the blades of bright bayonets could be seen pushing up through the soil in Kansas. We see, then, the profound unity of Garrison's whole course, and may examine with indulgence some minor failures in logic which are very characteristic of him — very charact
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Chapter 9: Garrison and Emerson. (search)
t a coveted office: it is open to all men. Never for one moment was Emerson's mission far from his thought. His fear of approaching it, his excessive reverence for it, is due to his artistic instinct; just as Garrison's blatancy about his mission — the same mission — is a part of Garrison's lack of artistic instinct. With that gleam of practical sagacity which distinguished him, Emerson had resigned from the Church at the first whisper of coercion. He was a free man. He was freer than Channing. He was freer even than Garrison; for Garrison kept founding Societies which gave him endless trouble. Emerson's early and unobtrusive retirement from office shows us an amusing exchange of roles between the two; for in this instance Emerson, the recluse, knew the world better than Garrison, the man of action. But Emerson knew the world only in spots. His diary shows us a mind that is almost callow. Never numbers, he writes, but the simple and wise shall judge, not the Whartons and
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Index (search)
ts, Anti-slavery,Channing, Emerson, R. W., May, S. J. Abolitionists, and free speech, 27; W. E. Channing and, 27, 28, 88; and Turner's rebellion, 51, 52; paradoxical fate of, 59,60; and G.'s Though Canterbury, Conn., Crandall case at, 70 if. Chamberlain, Daniel H., quoted, 243. Channing, William Ellery, and the slavery question, 26 f., 87, 88; and Abolition, 27, 28, 81-86; and Follen, 29,outh in, IoI, Io9 if.; meeting in, on Lovejoy murder, 129 if. Follen, Charles, death of, 28; Channing and proposed meeting in commemoration of, 29, 30; and the Lunt Committee, 124, 125. Forster, his influence on the nation's course, 7, 8; effect of his first utterances on slavery, 17; and Channing, 28; at Channing's Church, 31,32; hisessential quality, 34; aggressiveness, 34ff.; first editorng, 13, 14, 15; reaction against that policy, 16 ff.; effect of G.'s first utterance on, 17; W. E. Channing and, 26ff.; attitudeof Northern merchants toward, 32, 33; vulture quality of, 48; friends of
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
dered that name so illustrious. Such are our principles, and such our candidates. We present them fearlessly to the country. Upon the people depends the question, whether their certain triumph shall be immediate or postponed; for triumph they must. The old and ill-compacted party organizations are broken, and from their ruins is now formed a new party, The Party of Freedom. There are good men who longed for this, and have died without the sight. John Quincy Adams longed for it. William Ellery Channing longed for it. Their spirits hover over us, and urge us to persevere. Let us be true to the moral grandeur of our cause. Have faith in Truth and in God, who giveth the victory. Oh, a fair cause stands firm and will abide; Legions of angels fight upon its side! Fellow-citizens, I am tempted to exclaim, seeing the spirit which animates your faces, that the work is already done to-night—that the victory is already achieved. But I would not lull you to the repose which springs fro
dered that name so illustrious. Such are our principles, and such our candidates. We present them fearlessly to the country. Upon the people depends the question, whether their certain triumph shall be immediate or postponed; for triumph they must. The old and ill-compacted party organizations are broken, and from their ruins is now formed a new party, The Party of Freedom. There are good men who longed for this, and have died without the sight. John Quincy Adams longed for it. William Ellery Channing longed for it. Their spirits hover over us, and urge us to persevere. Let us be true to the moral grandeur of our cause. Have faith in Truth and in God, who giveth the victory. Oh, a fair cause stands firm and will abide; Legions of angels fight upon its side! Fellow-citizens, I am tempted to exclaim, seeing the spirit which animates your faces, that the work is already done to-night—that the victory is already achieved. But I would not lull you to the repose which springs fro
My subject will be the necessity, Practicability, and dignity of the Anti-Slavery Enterprise, with Glimpses at the special duties of the North. By this enterprise I do not mean the efforts of any restricted circle, sect, or party, but the cause of the slave, in all its forms and degrees, and under all its names,—whether inspired by the pulpit, the press, the economist, or the politician,—whether in the early, persistent, and comprehensive demands of Garrison, the gentler utterances of Channing, or the strictly constitutional endeavors of others now actually sharing the public councils of the country. To carry through this review, under its different heads, I shall not hesitate to meet the objections which have been urged against it, so far at least as I am aware of them. And now, as I speak to you seriously, I venture to ask your serious attention even to the end. Not easily can a public address reach that highest completeness which is found in mingling the useful and the agree
My subject will be the necessity, Practicability, and dignity of the Anti-Slavery Enterprise, with Glimpses at the special duties of the North. By this enterprise I do not mean the efforts of any restricted circle, sect, or party, but the cause of the slave, in all its forms and degrees, and under all its names,—whether inspired by the pulpit, the press, the economist, or the politician,—whether in the early, persistent, and comprehensive demands of Garrison, the gentler utterances of Channing, or the strictly constitutional endeavors of others now actually sharing the public councils of the country. To carry through this review, under its different heads, I shall not hesitate to meet the objections which have been urged against it, so far at least as I am aware of them. And now, as I speak to you seriously, I venture to ask your serious attention even to the end. Not easily can a public address reach that highest completeness which is found in mingling the useful and the agree
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Seventh: return to the Senate. (search)
elf the Slave for the master's use the Abrogation of marriage Abrogation of the Parental relation Appropriation of the Slave's toil Jean Jacques Rousseau--Dr. Channing degradation of a whole race origin of Slavery in Africa home of the Slave code practical result of Slavery the Harpy defies the Banquet Slave and Free Sthound. Slavery is often exposed as degrading Humanity. On this fruitful theme nobody ever expressed himself with the force and beautiful eloquence of our own Channing. His generous soul glowed with indignation at the thought of man, supremest creature of earth, and first of God's works, despoiled of manhood and changed to a thing. But earlier than Channing was Jean Jacques Rousseau, who, with similar eloquence and the same glowing indignation, vindicated Humanity. How grandly he insists that nobody can consent to be a slave, or can be born a slave! Believing Liberty the most noble of human attributes, this wonderful writer will not stop to consider
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