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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Maria W. Chapman or search for Maria W. Chapman in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
t least without resistance—to Missouri, where the husband brought suit for their freedom. The State court denied the suit, in default of evidence that their owners meant to manumit them by taking them on to free soil. Appeal was then made to the Federal Supreme Court, a body of nine members, of whom five were Lib. 27.62. slaveholders. The article in the Westminster [for July, 1857, by Harriet Lib. 27.173, 177, 181. Martineau, on the Manifest Destiny of the American Union], wrote Mrs. M. W. Chapman to Mr. Garrison, was, Ms. Oct. 24 (?), 1857. I find by comparison of dates, written at a time when no two papers in the United States agreed as to what the Dred Scott decision did mean—all the A. S. papers agreeing that if it meant anything, it meant the extension of slavery throughout the States. . . . I should really like to read the decision, with all the different ideas as to what it means—if I had a month's leisure. I must confess to not having yet done so, whatever the We<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 20: Abraham Lincoln.—1860. (search)
needless to say, not called by Garrisonian abolitionists. Turned out of doors by the Mayor, it adjourned for the evening to the Belknap-Street (colored) Church, where the spirit of violence was still more rampant, at least at the close, when Mrs. Chapman was thought to have saved M. W. Chapman. Mr. Phillips's life by her companionship, and when he himself had to be escorted home by a body-guard. The orator's scarifying review of these proceedings, from Lib. 30.202, 203. Theodore Parker's puM. W. Chapman. Mr. Phillips's life by her companionship, and when he himself had to be escorted home by a body-guard. The orator's scarifying review of these proceedings, from Lib. 30.202, 203. Theodore Parker's pulpit, on Sunday, December 16,—his topic being Mobs and Education,—brought him a second (daylight) assault as he issued from the Music Hall, and made his return home a street fight. On the same day, in Brooklyn, Henry Ward Beecher had to be guarded by Lib. 30.203. police in Plymouth Church. In Philadelphia, George William Curtis, engaged to lecture on Honesty in a lyceum course, was suppressed by the joint apprehensions Lib. 30.209. of the Mayor and the owners of the hall. For all this,
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