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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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ted of one large Whitworth gun, two fine Rodmans, and three brass field pieces; one of these, however, was so badly broken up as to be worthless, and was left upon the field. Besides the rebels killed, whom I have mentioned, there was Brigadier-General Cooke, a son of General Philip St. George Cooke, of the Union army. His body was left on the field. After the fight had closed, we buried all our dead, brought off all our wounded, and came over Broad Run in perfect order and safety. WeGeneral Philip St. George Cooke, of the Union army. His body was left on the field. After the fight had closed, we buried all our dead, brought off all our wounded, and came over Broad Run in perfect order and safety. We have not lost a dollar's worth of property by capture. Our forces are now safely and securely posted, our trains all parked, and the army in excellent spirits. The rebel Colonel Thompson states that it was General Lee's object to head us off before reaching Centreville, and supposed when he made the attack upon General Warren he was at the head of the entire army with his corps; consequently he only threw forward one portion of D. P. Hill's corps, numbering in all about twelve thousand men
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
issued, without my knowledge, the order forming army corps and assigning the senior general officers to their command. First Corps, McDowell — Divisions: Franklin, McCall, and King; Second Corps, Sumner — Divisions: Richardson, Blenker, and Sedgwick; Third Corps, Heintzelman — Divisions: Porter, Hooker, and Hamilton; Fourth Corps, Keyes — Divisions: Couch, Smith, and Casey. The reserve artillery (Henry J. Hunt), the regular infantry (George Sykes), and regular cavalry (Philip St. George Cooke) and engineer troops were attached to headquarters.--Editors. My own views were that, as the command of army corps involved great responsibility and demanded ability of a high order, it was safer to postpone their formation until trial in the field had shown which general officers could best perform those vital functions. An incompetent division commander could not often jeopardize the safety of an army; while an unfit corps commander could easily lose a battle and frustrate the best-conce
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
oss (103d Pa.): w, 2. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Innis N. Palmer: 81st N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Jacob J. De Forest; 85th N. Y., Col. Jonathan S. Belknap; 92d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Hiram Anderson, Jr.; 93d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Benjamin C. Butler; 98th N. Y., Col. William Dutton. Artillery, Col. Guilford D. Bailey: 7th N. Y., Capt. Peter C. Regan; 8th N. Y., Capt. Butler Fitch; A, 1st N. Y., Capt. Thomas H. Bates; H, 1st N. Y., Capt. Joseph Spratt. advance-guard, Brig.-Gen. George Stoneman. Brig.-Gen. P. St. George Cooke and William H. Emory, brigade commanders. Cavalry: 8th Ill., Col. John F. Farnsworth; McClellan (11.) Dragoons, Maj. Charles W. Barker; 3d Pa., Col. William W. Averell; 1st U. S., Lieut.-Col. William N. Grier; 6th U. S., Maj. Lawrence Williams. Artillery, Lieut.-Col. William Hays: B and L, 2d U. S., Capt. James M. Robertson; M, 2d U. S., Capt. Henry Benson; C, 3d U. S., Capt. Horatio G. Gibson; K, 3d U. S., Capt. John C. Tidball. Advance-guard loss (mostly on May 4th) : k, 15
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stuart's ride around McClellan. (search)
ttempt to make a stand until they reached Old Church. Here their officers called a halt, and made an attempt to rally to defend their camp. Fitz Lee soon swept them out, and burned their camp. They made no other attempt to stand, and we heard no more of them as an organized body, but many prisoners were taken as we passed along. We had surprised them, taken them in detail, and far outnumbered them at all points. The Federal forces, as we afterward learned, were commanded by General Philip St. George Cooke, father-in-law to General Stuart, to whom the latter sent a polite message. The casualties in this skirmish were slight--one man killed on each side, and about fifteen or twenty wounded on the Confederate side, mostly saber-cuts. We halted for a short time at Old Church, and the people of the neighborhood, hearing of our arrival, came flocking out to greet us and wish us God-speed. They did not come empty-handed, but brought whatever they could snatch up on the spur of the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
son; 20th. N. Y., Col. Francis Weiss; 33d N. Y., Col. Robert F. Taylor; 49th N. Y., Col. Daniel D. Bidwell; 77th N. Y., Col. James B. McKean. Brigade loss: k, 12; w, 23; mn, 87 == 122. Artillery, Capt. Romeyn B. Ayres: E, 1st N. Y., Capt. Charles C. Wheeler; 1st N. Y., Capt. Andrew Cowan ; 3d N. Y., Capt. Thaddeus P. Mott; F, 5th U. S., Capt. Romeyn B. Ayres. Artillery loss: I, 3; w, 4; m, 15==22. Cavalry: I and K, 5th Pa., Capt. John O'Farrell. Loss: k, 1. cavalry reserve, Brig.-Gen. P. St. George Cooke. First Brigade: 6th Pa., Col. Richard H. Rush; 5th U. S. (5 co's), Capt. Charles J. Whiting (c), Capt. Joseph H. McArthur. Second Brigade, Col. George A. 11. Blake: 1st U. S. (4 co's), Lieut.-Col. William N. Grier; 6th U. S. (with Stoneman's command), Capt. August V. Kautz. Cavalry Reserve loss: k, 14; xw, 55; in, 85 == 154. [Brig.-Gen's George Stoneman and William H. Emory operated on the right flank of the army with a mixed command of infantry, cavalry, and artillery.] T
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
essed the belief that they were about to be attacked by bodies larger than their own, and objected to detaching any part of their troops. [See foot-note, p. 180.] From the cavalry scouts of Colonel John F. Farnsworth, Stoneman, and General P. St. George Cooke, whose forces stretched, in the order named, from Meadow Bridge north to the Pamunkey, reports came that Jackson was advancing slowly upon my flank. The outposts at Meadow Bridge, the extreme western front of Porter's line, were att message, telling him that he was selected because of the speed of his horse. He turned as if to go, and I went to attend to the field. Soon the Count returned, with tears in his eyes, and with choking utterance, expressive Brevet Major-General Philip St. George Cooke. From a photograph. of his care and affection, begged me again to send away his uncle. This also I did. Scarcely had the Prince left the second time when our cavalry fell back on us as I have related, our line was broken, and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The charge of Cooke's cavalry at Gaines's Mill. (search)
The charge of Cooke's cavalry at Gaines's Mill. by Philip St. George Cooke, Brevet Major-General, U. S. A. In The century for June, 1885, there is an article on the battle of Gaines's Mill, sigCooke, Brevet Major-General, U. S. A. In The century for June, 1885, there is an article on the battle of Gaines's Mill, signed by Fitz John Porter, in which appear singular errors of statement regarding the action of the Cavalry reserve, affecting also the conduct and reputation of its commander. He says [see p. 340 of ng to the south bank of the Chickahominy. The loss of the guns was due to the fact that some of Cooke's cavalry, which had been directed to be kept, under all circumstances, in the valley of the Chiroken and was fast disappearing before the first advance of the cavalry. Again he says: General Cooke was instructed to take position, with cavalry, under the hills in the valley of the Chickahont that the projectiles striking the ground raise a permanent cloud of dust. At that moment General Cooke charged at the head of his calvary; but that movement does not succeed, and his horsemen on
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Recollections of a participant in the charge. (search)
ire of musketry and artillery was poured upon them. Just before dark, when we could tell, by the sound of the musketry fire and by the constantly advancing yells of the charging foe, that he was getting near the guns in our front, General Philip St. George Cooke, commanding the cavalry, rode to our front. I was on the right of the front line of the first squadron, and I heard his order to Captain Whiting, commanding the five companies of our regiment that were present on the field. He said, Captain, as soon as you see the advancing line of the enemy rising the crest of the hill, charge at once, without any further orders, to enable the artillery to bring off their guns. General Cooke then rode back around the right of our squadron. Captain Whiting turned to us and said, Cavalry! Attention! Draw saber! then added something to the effect, Boys, we must charge in five minutes. Almost immediately, the bayonets of the advancing foe were seen, just beyond our cannon, probably n
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.47 (search)
uch acrimonious dispute among Federal officers, especially Generals Porter and Philip St. George Cooke, the latter commanding the cavalry on Porter's extreme left next to the Chickahominy. In order to protect the guns upon which Law and Hood were advancing, General Cooke withdrew a portion of his command from the low grounds near the river and ordered a charge by a battalion of the 5th United Sbeyond the stream along which his infantry line was originally formed, and severely censures General Cooke, charging him with throwing the artillery into confusion by retreating through it and prevenate advance. His statement as to the locality of the cavalry attack and his charges against General Cooke cannot be reconciled; for, had Cooke's cavalry attacked where General Porter says it did, itCooke's cavalry attacked where General Porter says it did, it would have been utterly impossible for its line of retreat to have passed anywhere near the position of the batteries, and its flight after the repulse could have had no effect whatever upon the los
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., With the cavalry on the Peninsula. (search)
red these streams formidable obstacles. Above this dismal landscape the fierce rays of the sun were interrupted only at night, or by deluges of rains, so that men and animals were alternately scorched and drenched. These conditions made cavalry operations in this region affairs of squadrons. The cavalry had been organized into a division under General George Stoneman, chief of cavalry, and distributed by assignment to the corps of the army, excepting the cavalry reserve under General P. St. George Cooke and that portion which was attached to general headquarters. During the month of the siege of Yorktown not an hour was lost which could be applied to cavalry instruction. Alertness and steadiness soon characterized our cavalrymen. No incident was fruitless. When grindstones were procured and the sabers of my regiment were sharpened at Hampton, it produced a similar effect upon the men. Few but cavalry names reached the ears of the army on the day of the evacuation and pursu
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