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Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 9: agitation and repression. (search)
humiliation of a third refusal and must have listened with no little relief, to this blunt summary of the situation by Beriah Green, who was one of the six. If there is not timber amongst ourselves, quoth Green, big enough to make a president of, letGreen, big enough to make a president of, let us get along without one, or go home and stay there until we have grown up to be men. The next day Green was chosen, and established in a manner never to be forgotten by his associates that the convention did possess timber big enough to make a prGreen was chosen, and established in a manner never to be forgotten by his associates that the convention did possess timber big enough to make a president of. Narrow as were the circumstances of many of the members, the convention was by no means destitute of men of wealth and business prominence. Such were the Winslows, Isaac and Nathan, of Maine, Arnold Buffum, of Massachusetts, and Johnof the convention, culminated during the several readings of the Declaration of Sentiments. And when on the third day Beriah Green brought the congress to a close in a valedictory address of apostolic power and grandeur, and with a prayer so sweet,
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 10: between the acts. (search)
ruths to, masculine words. He protests against his condemnation by comparison. Every writer's style is his own — it may be smooth or rough, plain or obscure, simple or grand, feeble or strong, he contends, but principles are immutable. By his principles, therefore he would, be judged. Whittier, for instance,, he continues, is highly poetical, exuberant, and beautiful. Stuart is solemn, pungent, and severe. Wright is a thorough logician, dextrous, transparent, straightforward. Beriah Green is manly, eloquent, vigorous, devotional. May is persuasive, zealous, overflowing with the milk of human kindness. Cox is diffusive, sanguine, magnificent, grand. Bourne thunders and lightens. Phelps is one great, clear, infallible argumentdemonstration itself. Jocelyn is full of heavenlymindedness, and feels and speaks and acts with a zeal according to knowledge. Follen is chaste, profound, and elaborately polished. Goodell is perceptive, analytical, expert, and solid. Child (
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 14: brotherly love fails, and ideas abound. (search)
had been formed in the North every day for the last two years, and that in the single State of Ohio there were three hundred societies, one of which had a membership of four thousand names. The moral agitation was at its height. The National Society had hit upon a capital device for increasing the effectiveness of its agents and lecturers. This was to bring them together in New York for a few weeks' study of the slavery question under the direction of such masters as Theodore D. Weld, Beriah Green, Charles Stuart, and others. All possible phases of the great subject, such as, What is slavery? What is immediate emancipation? The consequences of emancipation to the South, etc., etc., pro-slavery objections and arguments were stated and answered. The agents and lecturers went forth from the convention bristling with facts, and glowing with enthusiasm to renew the crusade against slavery. Garrison, broken in health as he was, went on from Boston to attend this school of his discip
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
Indeed, we must have been a very stupid body if, among so many, and making common stock of all our minds, we could not make our sessions full of interest and pleasure. We held three meetings a day, scarcely allowing ourselves time to eat; and yet, when a fortnight had been thus incessantly occupied, it seemed as if we were but just entering upon the threshold of the great question of slavery—so exhaustless is the theme, so vast the relations involved in the well-being and freedom of man. Beriah Green, Weld, and Stuart were the chief speakers, although every one present participated more or less in the discussions. I spoke repeatedly, but very briefly as I am wont to do. You know that I always speak in public with reluctance, especially if my remarks be not written down—and to read is a slavish mode of speaking, if speaking it can be called (Ms. April 10, 1836, W. L. G. to G. W. Benson). The questions discussed were manifold—such as, What is slavery? What is immediate emancipation?<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
e. So far, therefore, all's well. Monday evening.—I have just returned from a large meeting of the colored friends in Zion's Church, very many of whom were induced to attend by knowing that I would be present. The meeting was addressed by Beriah Green, Alvan Stewart, Rev. Mr. Cross, Charles W. Denison, and myself. It was an John Cross. interesting occasion. The manner in which these dear colored friends throng around me is very affecting to my feelings. Their expressions of attachment ay man as Representative to Congress who is not in favor of the immediate abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia, etc. At the impressive Young Men's Convention held at Worcester, Lib. 8.159, 161, 162. Mass., in October, with Goodell, Beriah Green, and H. B. Stanton in attendance, nineteen resolutions on political action were reported from the business committee, whose chairman was Wendell Phillips, Mr. Garrison being one of his colleagues. They bound abolitionists to vote for no man n
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
Mr. Garrison, mindful of the long-winded tactics of his opponents) were limited to ten minutes, but there was no flagging. The question most discussed, and which occupied a day and a half, was as to allowing women delegates to sit and act with the Society. The opposition came chiefly from clergymen, and these from Massachusetts; Nathaniel Colver moving that the Lib. 9.82. committee enroll only men. With him voted his brother ministers Phelps, Orange Scott, George Storrs, George Allen, Beriah Green, La Roy Sunderland, among others, together with Birney and Lewis Tappan. Gerrit Smith, who was in the chair, and voted for the admission of women, thought that five to one were on his side, but Lewis Tappan called for the yeas and nays, which carried the vote over till the next forenoon, and gave a chance for rallying the opposition, and the final vote stood 180 yeas to 140 nays. Even then Phelps strove to obtain a declaration that the vote did not mean that women should speak, or act o
e, Samuel [1783-1861], type-founder, 1.73, (Greele & Willis), 220. Greeley, Horace [1811-1872], praises Journal of the Times, 1.113.—Portrait in Life. Green, Beriah, Rev. [b. Preston, Conn., Mar. 24, 1795; d. Whitesboro, N. Y., May 4, 1874], professor in Western Reserve College, 1.300; drops Colonization, 299; delegate to Nat in effigy, 461; address to 70 agents, 2.116, to colored people, N. Y., 210; at Worcester Convention, 245; opposes enrolment of women, 297.—Portrait in Sermons. Green, Duff [1794-1875], 2.79. Green, William [b. Stamford, Conn., Aug. 12, 1796; d. Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 21, 1881], a founder of N. Y. City A. S. Soc., 1.346, 381, Green, William [b. Stamford, Conn., Aug. 12, 1796; d. Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 21, 1881], a founder of N. Y. City A. S. Soc., 1.346, 381, and Nat. A. S. Convention, 398, committeeman, 399, prayer, 401; made Treas. Am. A. S. Soc. 415. Greener, Jacob, 1.145. Greener, Jacob C., 1.145, 149. Greener, Richard T., 1.145. Greener, Richard W., 1.145. Greenleaf, Simon [1783-1853], 1.302. Grew, Mrs. [probably Miss Anna], 2.47. Grew, Henry Rev. [b. Birmingham, Englan
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 8 (search)
rt and somewhat superficial. The pro-slavery side of the question has been eagerly sustained by theological reviews and doctors of divinity without number, from the half-way and timid faltering of Wayland up to the unblushing and melancholy recklessness of Stuart. The argument on the other side has come wholly from the Abolitionists; for neither Dr. Hague nor Dr. Barnes can be said to have added anything to the wide research, critical acumen, and comprehensive views of Theodore D. Weld, Beriah Green, J. G. Fee, and the old work of Duncan. On the constitutional questions which have at various times arisen,--the citizenship of the colored man, the soundness of the Prigg decision, the constitutionality of the old Fugitive Slave Law, the true construction of the slave-surrender clause,--nothing has been added, either in the way of fact or argument, to the works of Jay, Weld, Alvan Stewart, E. G. Loring, S. E. Sewall, Richard Hildreth, W. I. Bowditch, the masterly essays of the Emancip
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 7: Baltimore jail, and After.—1830. (search)
l notions and be guided by us (the clergy), we will make you the Wilberforce of America. Of a very different mould from Dr. Beecher was the young Unitarian minister who now allied himself with Mr. Garrison. One of the sweetest and gentlest of men, disliking controversy with all his soul, he did not for a moment shrink from the path of trial which now opened before him. On the Sunday following the delivery of Mr. Garrison's lectures, Mr. May occupied the pulpit of Rev. Mr. Young at Church Green, in Summer Street. Of course, he said, I could not again speak to a May's Recollections, pp. 20-22. congregation, as a Christian minister, and be silent respecting the great iniquity of our nation. The only sermon I had brought from my home in Connecticut that could be made to bear on the subject, was one on Prejudice—the sermon about to be published as one of the Tracts of the American Unitarian Association. So I touched it up as well as I could, interlining here and there words and s
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
ash their teeth, and, in the absence of any other defence, invoked the mob. It was in vain. The fire was kindled. When such men as the Tappans, Alvan Stewart, Gerrit Smith, General Fessenden, Theodore D. Weld, N. P. Rogers, President Storrs, Beriah Green, William Goodell, Joshua Leavitt, Amos A. Phelps, dropped the Colonization Society, Not all those mentioned by Mr. Wright waited for the publication of the Thoughts to discontinue their support of the Society. See, for Arthur Tappan, ante,, of England, will be related hereafter. At the time of the appearance of the Thoughts, Mr. Wright was Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in the Western Reserve College at Hudson, O.. and so a colleague of President Storrs and Professor Green (Lib. 3.2). It should be mentioned here that it was owing exclusively to the liberality of Isaac Winslow, of Portland, that Mr. Garrison was enabled to publish his Thoughts (Ms. Aug. 20. 1867, to Samuel May, Jr.) a moral victory was certai
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