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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of the Petersburg crater. (search)
, as the small fort immediately in front of the Fifth Corps was almost, if not entirely, abandoned for a while after the explosion of the mine, the men running away from it as if they feared that it was to be blown up also. Whether General Ledlie informed General Burnside of the condition of affairs as reported by me I do not know; but I think it likely, as it was not long after I had returned to the crater that a brigade of the Second Division (Potter's) under the command of Brigadier-General S. G. Griffin advanced its skirmishers and followed them immediately, directing its course to the right of the crater. General Griffin's line, however, overlapped the crater on the left, where two or three of his regiments sought shelter in the crater. Those on the right passed over the trenches, but owing to the peculiar character of the enemy's works, which were not single, but complex and involuted and filled with pits, traverses, and bomb-proofs, forming a labyrinth as difficult of pass
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., In the crater. (search)
I went through the crater to the wing of the fort where I had left the guns in charge of a sergeant, and while I was passing through a narrow entrance General Hartranft, who had preceded me, called to me to drop down and crawl in, as sharp-shooters were picking off every one passing that point, which was in full view of the enemy. I escaped their bullets, but the next officer who came received a serious if not mortal wound. In this wing of the fort were Generals Potter, Hartranft, and S. G. Griffin, and myself, with one or two other officers. Bartlett, who was in the pit of the crater, had received a shot, disabling his artificial leg, and he could not be carried to the rear. Colonel E. G. Marshall, commanding our brigade, was then on the outside of the fort. After remaining there some time and knowing that if the stay was prolonged we would go to Richmond and to Confederate prisons, or be killed, as the enemy were on the right flank and front of the crater then, I decided to ge
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
ut.-Col. Martin P. Avery; 50th Pa., Capt. George W. Brumm. Third Brigade, Lieut.-Col. Gilbert P. Robinson: 3d Md. (4 co's), Capt. Joseph F. Carter; 29th Mass., Capt. Charles T. Richardson; 57th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Julius M. Tucker; 59th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Joseph Colburn; 14th N. Y. Heavy Art'y, Maj. George M. Randall; 100th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Joseph H. Pentecost. Acting Engineers: 17th Mich., Lieut.-Col. Frederick W. Swift. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Robert B. Potter (on leave), Brig.-Gen. Simon G. Griffin. First Brigade, Col. John I. Curtin: 35th Mass., Col. Sumner Carruth; 36th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Thaddeus L. Barker; 58th Mass., Lieut.-Col. John C. Whiton; 39th N. J., Col. Abram C. Wildrick; 51st N. Y., Capt. Thomas B. Marsh; 46th Pa., Capt. Roland C. Cheeseman; 48th Pa., Lieut.-Col. George W. Gowan; 4th and 7th R. I., Lieut.-Col. Percy Daniels. Second Brigade, Col. Herbert B. Titus: 31st Me., Maj. George A. Bolton; 2d Md., Lieut.-Col. Benjamin F. Taylor; 56th Mass., Lieut.-Col.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 15.100 (search)
trations on our lines, but no real attack. Late in the afternoon it was ascertained that a large portion of their forces had passed through McDonough, ten miles or more to the east of us, and were nearer to Macon than we were. I fell back from Griffin at dark, and in less than twenty-four hours reached Forsythe, thirty-five miles distant, just in time to repel the advance of Sherman's cavalry and save the large depot of supplies at that place. In the meantime Sherman had commenced crossing tand, to the bank of the Ocmulgee, in rear of our fortifications. During the night Wheeler extricated his forces, and passed out to the south and east, thus again placing his cavalry on the flank and in front of Sherman. The militia had saved Griffin, Forsythe, and Macon; but as yet there had been no serious collision with the Federals. The face of the country was open, the roads were in good order, the weather was fine and bracing, the crops had been gathered, and were ready for use; in sh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. (search)
s division had been driven in, and both he and Crawford were falling back upon Griffin. Miles, of Humphreys's corps, was sent to reenforce Warren, and by noon the een should send Ayres down the Boydton plank and across by the Brooks road, and Griffin and Crawford by the Crump road, which runs from the White Oak road south to J.ouse. Ayres had his division on this road, having arrived about daylight, and Griffin had reached J. Boisseau's between 7 and 8 A. M. I had a full conference with Snd form in order of battle, with Ayres on the left, Crawford on his right, and Griffin in rear as a reserve. The corps was to wheel to the left, and make its attackrelieved Warren, directed him to report in person to General Grant, and placed Griffin in command of the Fifth Corps. I had sent frequent bulletins during the day tned to call him, was in advance thundering along with his cavalry, followed by Griffin and the rest of the Army of the Potomac, while Ord was swinging along toward B
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Warren at five Forks, and the court of inquiry. (search)
as formed accordingly: Ayres on the left, in three lines of battle; Crawford on the right, in three lines of battle; and Griffin's division in reserve in masses. This occupied till 4 P. M. The forward movement then began. General Ayres's division forests, and the greater distance to gain, he lost his connection with General Ayres. Into the interval thus left General Griffin's division was placed. These two divisions steadily drove in the enemy's left flank. General Crawford's division mhave reached Sheridan at 12 o'clock on the night of March 31st, as Grant had expected; but that Warren should have moved Griffin and Crawford at once, as ordered. Third. General Sheridan says: General Warren did not exert himself to get up hi exert himself to inspire. The court found that Warren was exerting himself to remedy the divergence of Crawford and Griffin, after Ayres changed front to the left, and thinks this was for him the essential point to be attended to, which also ex
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Appomattox campaign. (search)
; 18th N. H., Lieut.-Col. Joseph M. Clough; 14th N. Y. Heavy Art'y, Maj. George M. Randall; 100th Pa., Maj. Norman J. Maxwell. Acting Engineers: 17th Mich., Lieut.-Col. Frederick W. Swift. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Robert B. Potter, Brig.-Gen. Simon G. Griffin. First Brigade, Col. John I. Curtin: 35th Mass., Col. Sumner Carruth; 36th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Thaddeus L. Barker; 58th Mass., Lieut.-Col. John C. Whiton; 39th N. J., Col. Abram C. Wildrick; 51st N. Y., Capt. Thomas B. Marsh; 45th Pa., Capt. Roland C. Cheeseman, Lieut.-Col. Theodore Gregg; 48th Pa., Col. George W. Gowan, Lieut.-Col. Isaac F. Brannon; 7th R. I., Lieut.-Col. Percy Daniels. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Simon G. Griffin, Col. Walter Harriman: 31st Me., Lieut.-Col. Edward L. Getchell, Capt. Ebenezer S. Kyes; 2d Md., Lieut.-Col. Benjamin F. Taylor; 56th Mass., Maj. Zabdiel B. Adams, Col. Stephen M. Weld, Jr.; 6th N. H., Lieut.-Col. Phin. P. Bixby; 9th N. H., Capt. John B. Cooper; 11th N. H., Col. Walter Harriman, Ca
arlow's Second 18 277 295 83d Pennsylvania Griffin's Fifth 11 271 282 7th Wisconsin Wadsworthrlow's Second 12 198 210 9th Massachusetts Griffin's Fifth 15 194 209 81st Pennsylvania Barloow's Second 1339 210 15.6 83d Pennsylvania Griffin's Fifth 1808 282 15.5 22d Massachusetts Gr's Twelfth 1305 187 14.3 9th Massachusetts Griffin's Fifth 1654 209 12.6 10th Massachusetts Gon's Ninth 1178 159 13.4 22d Massachusetts Griffin's Fifth 1393 216 15.5 25th Massachusetts W Birney's Third 1238 158 12.7 4th Michigan Griffin's Fifth 1325 189 14.2 5th Michigan Birney'illcox's Ninth 1770 223 12.5 16th Michigan Griffin's Fifth 1929 247 12.8 17th Michigan Willcoibbon's Second 2575 361 14.0 44th New York Griffin's Fifth 1365 182 13.3 48th New York Terry'ow's Second 1608 208 12.9 83d Pennsylvania Griffin's Fifth 1808 282 15.5 84th Pennsylvania Hu's Second 1004 104 10.3 118th Pennsylvania Griffin's Fifth 1276 141 11.0 119th Pennsylvania W[6 more...]
s Second 59 63d New York Antietam Richardson's Second 59 76th Pennsylvania Fort Wagner Assault of July 11, 1864--not the main assault. Seymour's Tenth 59 83d Pennsylvania This regiment appears again in this same list. Spotsylvania Griffin's Fifth 59 96th Pennsylvania Spotsylvania Wright's Sixth 59 28th Illinois Shiloh Hurlbut's ------ 58 31st Illinois Fort Donelson McClernand's ------ 58 47th Pennsylvania Cedar Creek Dwight's Nineteenth 58 55th Pennsylvania Drewry' Smith's ------ 55 38th Illinois Stone's River Davis's Fourteenth 55 37th Wisconsin Petersburg Mine Willcox's Ninth 55 7th Ohio Cedar Mountain Augur's Twelfth 55 5th New York Gaines' Mill Sykes's Fifth 55 140th New York Wilderness Griffin's Fifth 55 155th New York Cold Harbor Gibbon's Second 55 9th New York Antietam Rodman's Ninth 54 21st New York Manassas Hatch's First 54 40th New York Wilderness Birney's Second 54 112th New York Cold Harbor Devens's Tenth 54 1
e officers killed during the war: Infantry. Regiment. Division. Corps. Officers Killed. 61st Pennsylvania Getty's Sixth 19 5th New Hampshire Barlow's Second 18 12th Massachusetts Robinson's First 18 48th New York Terry's Tenth 18 73d New York Hooker's Third 18 81st Pennsylvania Barlow's Second 18 145th Pennsylvania Barlow's Second 18 31st Maine Potter's Ninth 18 20th Massachusetts Gibbon's Second 17 14th Connecticut Gibbon's Second 17 62d Pennsylvania Griffin's Fifth 17 63d Pennsylvania Birney's Third 17 5th Michigan Birney's Third 16 16th Massachusetts Humphreys's Third 16 61st New York Barlow's Second 16 126th New York Barlow's Second 16 82d Ohio Schurz's Eleventh 16 100th Pennsylvania Stevenson's Ninth 16 6th Wisconsin Wadsworth's First 16 Heavy Artillery. 1st Maine Birney's Second 23 8th New York Gibbon's Second 19 A heavy artillery regiment had just twice as many line officers as an infantry regiment.
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