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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Smith, Andrew Jackson 1815-1897 (search)
Smith, Andrew Jackson 1815-1897 Military officer; born in Bucks county, Pa., April 28, 1815; graduated at West Point in 1838; entered the dragoons; served in the war against Mexico and against the Indians in Oregon (1855-60); and when the Civil War broke out he was promoted major of cavalry. He was chief of cavalry in the Department of the Missouri in the spring of 1862, and in the Department of the Mississippi from March to July. He was one of the most active and useful officers in the Southwest, commanding divisions in Missouri and Arkansas, in the Vicksburg and Red River campaigns, and afterwards (1864) in driving Price out of Missouri, and assisting Thomas against Hood at Nashville. He was in the Mobile campaign, early in 1865. For his services during the war he was brevetted major-general and commissioned colonel of the 7th United Andrew Jackson Smith. States Cavalry. He resigned in May, 1869, and died in St. Louis, Mo., in 1897.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Spring Hill, engagement at (search)
between National troops under General Schofield and a Confederate army under General Hood. Hood had made a rapid march upon Columbia in the hope of gaining the rear Hood had made a rapid march upon Columbia in the hope of gaining the rear of Schofield, then at Pulaski; but Schofield returned to Columbia, thus checking Hood's plan. For several days the two armies remained near each other at Columbia. Hood's plan. For several days the two armies remained near each other at Columbia. On the 28th Hood made another attempt to gain Schofield's rear by a movement to Spring Hill; but General Stanley, who was sent with his division and a large part of Hood made another attempt to gain Schofield's rear by a movement to Spring Hill; but General Stanley, who was sent with his division and a large part of his artillery to Spring Hill, reached that place in time to prevent the Confederates from occupying it. During the afternoon of Nov. 29 Stanley's and Hood's advanced Hood's advanced troops had a considerable engagement, which resulted in further checking Hood's plans. At night the National troops left Spring Hill for Franklin, where a notable ba resulted in further checking Hood's plans. At night the National troops left Spring Hill for Franklin, where a notable battle was fought. See Franklin, Battle of..
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Thomas, George Henry 1816-1870 (search)
vember, 1862, he commanded the 14th Corps of the Army of the Cumberland, doing eminent service in the battles of Stone River and Chickamaugua (qq. v.). In October, 1863, he George Henry Thomas. was placed in command of the Department and Army of the Cumberland, and was promoted brigadier-general, United States army. He was in the battle of Missionary Ridge (q. v.), and did signal service in the Atlanta campaign, when he took post at Nashville and defended Tennessee against the invasion of Hood. For this service he was made a major-general, and received the thanks of Congress, and from the legislature of Tennessee a gold medal. In February, 1868, he was offered the brevet of lieutenant-general by President Johnson, but he declined to receive it. He died in San Francisco, Cal., March 28, 1870. On Nov. 19, 1879, an exquisitely wrought equestrian statue of General Thomas, in design and execution by J. Q. A. Ward, was unveiled at the national capital, with very imposing ceremonies, s
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Twining, William Johnson 1839-1882 (search)
Twining, William Johnson 1839-1882 Military officer; born in Indiana, Aug. 2, 1839; graduated at the United States Military Academy, and was commissioned a first lieutenant of engineers in 1863; and served through the remainder of the Civil War as assistant engineer in the Department of the Cumberland and as chief engineer of the Department of the Ohio. He was engaged in the invasion of Georgia, in the operations against General Hood's army in Tennessee, in the battles at Franklin and Nashville, and in the operations in North Carolina; was made captain of engineers in 1868; major in 1877; and was brevetted major and lieutenantcolonel of volunteers for gallantry during the war. After the war he served as assistant Professor of Engineering at the United States Military Academy in 1865-67; chief engineer of the Department of Dakota, commissioner for the survey of the United States boundaryline in 1872-76, and as commissioner of the District of Columbia in 1878-82. He died in Washin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
ly 9, 1864 Repulse of General Early at Fort Stevens, 6 miles from Washington......July 12, 1864 Gold reaches 285 per cent., the maximum......July 16, 1864 Hood supersedes Johnston in defence of Atlanta......July 17, 1864 President calls for 500,000 volunteers for one, two, or three years......July 18, 1864 On July 5. George H. Pendleton, of Ohio, nominated on the second ballot for Vice-President......Aug. 31, 1864 Battles of Jonesborough, Ga.......Aug. 31–Sept. 1, 1864 Hood evacuates Atlanta, Ga.......Sept. 1, 1864 Gen. John H. Morgan killed at Greenville, Tenn.......Sept. 4, 1864 General McClellan's letter accepting nomination,dies at Washington, D. C.......Dec. 10, 1864 Fort McAllister, Savannah, Ga., captured by Hazen's division of Sherman's army......Dec. 13, 1864 Thomas defeats Hood at Nashville, Tenn......Dec. 15-16, 1864 President Lincoln calls for 300,000 volunteers to make up deficiency in call July 18, 1864. If not obtained before Feb
ected six Thomas Hutchinson to his son, then in England, 29 May, 1766. of the ablest friends of the people in the board. John Adams: Diary in Works, II. 204. He had the legal right to do so; and the Legislature submitted without a murmur. Samuel Adams to Arthur Lee, 19 April, 1771. Here the altercation should have terminated. But on the following day, Bernard—an abject coward, See the Journal of Captain Conner of the Romney, and the letters of the Romney, and the letters Commodore Hood, &c., &c., as well as the Boston Gazette.—Grenville Papers, IV. 375. where courage was needed, and now insolent when he should have been conciliatory—sought to constrain Chap. XXV.} 1766. May. the election of Hutchinson, Oliver, and two others, Bernard to the Lords of Trade, 7 July, 1766. and accused the House of having determined its votes from private interests and resentment and popular discontent, disguised under the borrowed garb of patriotism. It were to be wished, he contin<
any thing to get them sent; and he used to protest he wished the people of the Province could have a sight of all his letters to the Ministry, that they might become convinced of his friendship. Town of Boston's Appeal to the world, 22. At the same time he was constantly entreating the Secretary to conceal his correspondence. To ensure the arrival of an armed force, the Com- Chap. XXXII.} 1768. March missioners of the Customs applied directly to the Naval Commander at Halifax, Commodore Hood to Mr. Grenville, Halifax, July 11, 1768, in Grenville papers, IV. 306. and also sent a second memorial to the Lords of the Treasury. They said that a design had certainly been formed to bring them on the eighteenth of March to Liberty Tree, and oblige them to renounce their commissions. The Governor and magistracy, they add, have not the least authority or power in this place. The mob are ready to be assembled on any occasion. Every officer who exerts himself in the execution of his
not only in the town, but throughout the province. Harrison and Hallowell to Commissioners, 14 June, 1768; Letters to the Ministry, 136. On the fifteenth of Chap XXXIV} 1768. June. June, the Commissioners of the Customs wrote to Gage and to Hood, demanding further protection; for, said they, the leaders of the people of Boston will urge them to open revolt. The Commissioners to Gen. Gage and Commodore Hood, 15 June, 1768. Letters to the Ministry, 137. To the Lords of ,the TreasuryCommodore Hood, 15 June, 1768. Letters to the Ministry, 137. To the Lords of ,the Treasury they reported a long concerted and extensive plan of resistance to the authority of Great Britain, breaking out in acts of violence sooner than was intended; and they gave their opinion that nothing but the immediate exertion of military power would prevent an open revolt of the town of Boston, and probably of the Provinces. Commissioners to the Lords of the Treasury, 16 June, 1768. If there is not a revolt, wrote Bernard to Hillsborough, the leaders of the Sons of Liberty must falsify t
anchored near the Romney, Captain Smith to Commodore Hood, 5 Oct. 1768. off Castle William, in the hope t Hillsborough, 126. Lieut. Colonel Dalrymple to Commodore Hood, 4-5 Oct. 1768. and to take the whole upon himsnon, effected their landing Captain Smith to Commodore Hood, 5 Oct. 1768. L. Col. Dalrymple to Gage, Berna and thereby secured all their arms. Dalrymple to Hood, 4 Oct. 1768. I will keep possession of this towthe Ministry, 94, 5 October, 1768; Dalrymple to Commodore Hood, 4 October, 1768; Captain Smith to Commodore HoCommodore Hood, 5 October, 1768. After two days reflection, the Council consented to the appointment of a commissary, , than which nothing can be more uncertain. While Hood meditated embarking for Boston to winter there, CCommodore Hood to Mr. Stephens, Secretary of the Admiralty; Halifax, 12 Oct. 1768. Gage came from New-York to d barracks at the Castle were filled. Gage to Commodore Hood, 18 Oct. 1768. The Governor and the Sheriff
s far from a solution as ever. Choiseul to Du Chatelet, Ver sailles, 24 Dec. 1768. At Boston the attempt was made to spread terror by threats of seizing the popular leaders. They expect a voyage to England against their inclination; wrote Hood, Hood to Stephens, 12 Dec. 1768. In Letters to the Ministry, 113. who had the chief command of Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. the ships in the harbor. But Samuel Adams, whom it was especially desired to take off for treason, unawed by the menaces Hood to Stephens, 12 Dec. 1768. In Letters to the Ministry, 113. who had the chief command of Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. the ships in the harbor. But Samuel Adams, whom it was especially desired to take off for treason, unawed by the menaces of arbitrary power, Boston Gazette, 5 Dec. 1768. pursued his system without fear or faltering. I must, said he, Boston Gazette, 5 Dec. 1768. tell the men, who on both sides of the Atlantic charge America with rebellion, that military power will never prevail on an American to surrender his liberty; and through the press he taught the public that a standing army, Vindex, in Boston Gazette, 19 Dec. 1768. kept up in the Colonies in time of peace without their consent, was as flagrant a vi
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