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a company at the beginning of the Confederate war, being chosen captain of his company, and on regimental organization elected colonel of the First Arkansas Confederate infantry. His subsequent achievements gave him high rank and an honorable name in that eventful struggle. On September 12, 1862, Colonel Fagan was promoted to brigadier-general in the provisional army of the Confederate States. He commanded a brigade composed of the Arkansas regiments of Colonels Brooks, Hawthorn, Bell and King, in the siege of Helena, in all 1,339 men, and lost 435 in the determined assaults of his command on Hindman's hill. His gallantry in this bloody engagement was warmly commended by Gen. T. H. Holmes. General Fagan's command was operating in southern Arkansas during the Federal campaign against Shreveport in 1864, and after Banks' defeat at Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, General Fagan, in command of a cavalry division comprising the Arkansas brigades of W. L. Cabell, T. P. Dockery and W. A. Cr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Company I, 61st Virginia Infantry, Mahone's Brigade, C. S. A. (search)
. Evans. Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg: Revil W. Custis, James E. Mears, and one who deserted. Wilderness: Elvin K. Casey. Shady Grove: Wm. Mason. Spotsylvania: Joseph King and Thomas Butt, who was mortally wounded. Turkey Ridge: George King and Ammon Peek. Frazier's Farm: Captain C. R. McAlpine. Crater: Lieutenant John Hobday, J. D. White, sergeant Richard White. Johnson's Farm: John C. Miller. Roll of honor. Major Charles R. McAlpine, Captain John Hobday, sergeanteant Ammon Peek, October 27, 1864, Burgess' Mill. Sergeant Charles Evans, October 19, 1864, Johnson's Farm. Sergeant Laban T. Godwin, October 19, 1864, Johnson's Farm.. Private Denward Hyslop, October 19, 1s864, Johnson's Farm. Private George King, October 19, 1864, Johnson's Farm. Private Thomas Peel, October 19, 1864, Johnson's Farm. Private Elias W. Cherry, July 4, 1863, Gettysburg. Private Joseph F. Hewlett, July 4, 1863, Gettysburg. Private Joseph F. Mears, May 29,
June 29, 1837 Hardy, JohnFeb. 9, 1846 39 Hatch, ReubenApr. 9, 1770 Hathaway, Edward K. July 7, 1844 5-10 Son of A. K. Hathaway, the school teacher, who lived on Ashland street.—F. A. W. Heyward, Henry Ware Nov. 30, 1838 6 Jacobs, WalterJuly, 1822 NAMETIMEAGE Jewell, Henry W.June 1, 184724-6 Johnson, JohnJuly 25, 18318 Keefe, Patrick (canal)July 5, 184814 King, John FobesOct. 10, 183520 Lost at sea, son of Capt. John King, who lived at the head of Stearns avenue. Capt. George King, another son, was lost at sea.—F. A. W. Lameul, FrancisSept. 13, 184621 Learned, ThomasDec. 15, 182060 Loring, WilliamSept. 5, 18408 Monson, NathanJune 13, 1817 Pratt, —— Capt.Aug. 31, 180267 Ramsdill,—–July 7, 1803 July 7, 1803 Reed, Captain HenryOct. 12, 182643 Richards, Stephen A. (in canal)June 13, 18423-6 Richardson, JamesJuly 16, 184824 Richardson, John (canal)Feb. 13, 18248 Robbins, JamesApr. 29, 1771 Smith, Francis A.July 6, 182827 Stearns, DanielJuly 2, 18
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 17., An old Medford school boy's reminiscences. (search)
er bothered the boys. I should like one of those great apples now. Perhaps all this beautiful scene is now spoiled by the dam below or by the great sewer construction. I have not seen it for sixty years. Boating on the river was good. Captain King, who originally lived in the house later of Major Geo. L. Stearns, moved to a house near the river a little off South street, and set up a fine able boat. She was schooner rigged, a style best for shortening sail in our twisting river. His ke the little fellows aboard and go as far as Malden bridge where we caught big fish. Sometimes he would go up into the lower lake, though he disliked the trouble of passing under the canal aqueduct and the Weir bridge. But it all ended when George King went to sea, and later became a shipmaster himself, and then I built a boat of my own when I was about fourteen. She was a sort of flat bottomed scow but had a keel fastened on. A rake tail served as a mast. The sail was a sprit sail, easily
Prize Fights. --A prize fight between John Woods and George King, took place Wednesday, in the neighborhood of New York. Woods was the victor, by a "foul" fall on the part of King, after a contest of fifty-five rounds, lasting one hour and fifteen minutes. Woods, though receiving considerable bruising, concluded almost every round by knocking down or throwing his adversary. William O'Neill of Worcester, Mass., and Michael Fritz, of Providence, fought a prize fight for $1,000, near Portl"foul" fall on the part of King, after a contest of fifty-five rounds, lasting one hour and fifteen minutes. Woods, though receiving considerable bruising, concluded almost every round by knocking down or throwing his adversary. William O'Neill of Worcester, Mass., and Michael Fritz, of Providence, fought a prize fight for $1,000, near Portland, Me., on Monday. After a plucky contest of four hours and twenty minutes, Fritz received a foul blow from his adversary, and was declared the winner.
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