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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 38 (search)
between Mr. Memminger and Mr. Seddon. famine. a victory in Louisiana. Vice-President Stephens's speech. victory of Gen. Forrest. capture of Plymouth, N. C. Gen. Lee's bill of fare. April 1 Cloudy all day, with occasional light showers. No war news; but the papers have an account of the shooting of an infant by someflour for her family, white and black. Mr. Secretary Benjamin sent over, to-day, for passports to the Mississippi River for two secret agents. What for? Gen. Lee has made regulations to prevent cotton, tobacco, etc. passing his lines into the enemy's country, unless allowed by the government. But, then, several in author they are dying like sheep. April 7 A bright spring day. We look for startling news from the Rappahannock in a few days. Longstreet will be there. Gen. Lee writes that the fortifications around Richmond ought to be pushed to completion: 2000 negroes are still at work on them. April 8 Bright and warm — really a
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 40 (search)
Received a, letter from Custis. He is at Gen. Custis Lee's headquarters on ordnance duty. A prett It is believed here by the croakers that Gen. Lee has lost much of his influence, from the mome be the speediest way of relieving Richmond. Gen. Lee, however, knows best. At the conclave of changed his base-disappearing from the front of Lee in the night. He is supposed to be endeavoringutler on the south side. A. dispatch from Gen. Lee says Gen. Hampton has defeated Sheridan. as strong as ever. This is true generalship in Lee. But Grant can get more men. June 15 Cleamarch have been ruined; but our army is intact: Lee's losses altogether, in killed and wounded, notthe contest on the south side of the river. If Lee's army were broken, I doubt whether it would evmand by order of the President. At all events, Lee is at Petersburg. Sheridan's raiders are neervice, at hard labor on the fortifications, Custis Lee's brigade of clerks, who were assured, when [7 more...]
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 46 (search)
meditating an evacuation of the city. Gen. Custis Lee was at the department to-day, after the cgovernment is to be removed to Lynchburg. Gen. Lee has induced the President and Secretary of Wa in the departments, and it is whispered that Gen. Lee was governed in the matter by the family of tany misfortunes, and openly declare in favor of Lee as Dictator. Another month, and he may be unfortunate or unpopular. His son, Gen. Custis Lee, has mortally offended the clerks by putting them dee had but 8000 reliable men. The Georgians in Lee's army are more or less demoralized, and a rewae an abandonment of the cause. It is said Gen. Lee is to be invested with dictatorial powers, soin the picture. It is still believed that Gen. Lee is to be generalissimo, and most people rejoi in position, favor the scheme. To-morrow Gen. Lee's army is to be feasted with turkeys, etc. const Sherman now, who is still in Georgia! Gen. Lee writes that Grant is concentrating (probably [2 more...]
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 47 (search)
g among the people. Nearly all desire to see Gen. Lee at the head of affairs; and the President is C., petition the government to send a corps of Lee's army to save their State and Georgia from deve emergency. I have not seen it, but believe Gen. Lee has some such understanding with the Presidenrich having bought exemptions or details! Gen. Lee writes on the 8th instant, that the troops saspreads that Richmond is to be evacuated. Gen. Lee writes for the Secretary's sanction to send other have the odium than that it should fall on Lee! The Commissary General approves Lee's measureeasily manage Congress, by a few letters from Gen. Lee. But will the potency of his cabinet feed Lend they may be depleted by spring; and if so, Gen. Lee may be able to make another grand campaign win secret session has passed a resolution making Lee generalissimo. It is again said Mr. Seddon reating the office of commander-in-chief (for Gen. Lee), and recommending that Gen. Johnston be rein[33 more...]
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 48 (search)
Xlvii. February, 1865 Gen. Lee appointed General-in-chief. progress of Sherman. the markets. letter from Gen. Butler. return of the peace commissioners. the situation. from Gen. Lee. use of negroes as soldiers. patriotism of the women. pardon of deserters. the passport system. oh for peace! Gen. Lee on negrGen. Lee. use of negroes as soldiers. patriotism of the women. pardon of deserters. the passport system. oh for peace! Gen. Lee on negro soldiers. Conventions in Georgia and Mississippi. February 1 Clear and pleasant; subsequently thawing and foggy. Gen. R. E. Lee has been appointed General-in-Chief by the President, in response to the recent action of Congress and the clamorous demands of the people. It is to be hoped he will, nevertheless, remain in peGen. Lee on negro soldiers. Conventions in Georgia and Mississippi. February 1 Clear and pleasant; subsequently thawing and foggy. Gen. R. E. Lee has been appointed General-in-Chief by the President, in response to the recent action of Congress and the clamorous demands of the people. It is to be hoped he will, nevertheless, remain in person at the head of the Army of Virginia, else the change may be fraught with disaster, and then his popularity will vanish! He has not been fortunate when not present with the troops under his command, as evidenced by Early's defeat and Jones's disaster in the Valley last year. A general must continue to reap successes if he re
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XLIX. April, 1865 (search)
rue! Yesterday Gen. Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia. His son, Custis Lee, and other generals, had surrendered a few days previously. The men are parosent, he never would have consented to it; and I doubt if he will ever forgive Gen. Lee. April 11 Cloudy and misty. It is reported that Gen. Johnston has surrendered his army in North Carolina, following the example of Gen. Lee. But no salutes have been fired in honor of the event. The President (Davis) is supposed to be The salute some say was in honor of Johnston's surrenderothers say it was for Lee's-and others of Clay's birthday. April 13 Raining. Long trains of supply aknow too well what military occupation is. No intelligent person supposes, after Lee's surrender, that there will be found an army anywhere this side of the Mississiident Lincoln was appointed for illuminations and rejoicings on the surrender of Lee. There is no intelligence of the death of Mr. Seward or his son. It was a dastar
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 27: Gettysburg-Second day. (search)
dea. I told General Pendleton that you and General Lee were together the greater part of the day usideration, was rejected. Four years with General Lee. Colonel Taylor claims that the attack bywell on the afternoon of the 1st an order. General Lee says,--The strong position which the enemy or Law's brigade to join its division. But General Lee called for the two divisions, and had callere without it. Colonel Taylor says that General Lee urged that the march of my troops should beeneral and the two confidential officers of General Lee's staff for their testimony in the case, anought from Frederick the first account that General Lee had of the definite whereabouts of the enemy; of the excitement at General Lee's Headquarters among couriers, quartermasters, commissaries, et news brought by the scout. That afternoon General Lee was walking with some of us in the road in ing, you left your Headquarters and rode to General Lee's, where I found you sitting with him after[6 more...]
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
ill at Fredericksburg Controverted points casualties of the three days fight organization of the forces engaged. General Lee has reported of arrangements for the day,-- The general plan was unchanged. Longstreet, reinforced by Pickett's threecentre by a column to be composed of McLaws's and Hood's divisions reinforced by Pickett's brigades. Four years with General Lee, W. H. Taylor, page 103. I thought that it would not do; that the point had been fully tested the day before, by more and arrangement of the assault by the Confederate right, artillery fire was heard on our extreme left. It seems that General Lee had sent orders to General Ewell to renew his battle in the morning, which was intended, and directed, as a co-operatinder put a battery of nine guns under the ridge and out of the enemy's fire to be used with the assaulting column. General Lee said that the attack of his right was not made as early as expected,--which he should not have said. He knew that I d
waiting at Rice's Station, a corps of Confederate infantry under General Ewell, composed of Anderson's, Kershaw's, and Custis Lee's divisions. Stagg's brigade and Miller's battery, which, as I have said, had been left at the forks of the Deatonsvilcavalry, found himself suddenly beset by this new danger from his rear. To meet it, he placed Kershaw to the right and Custis Lee to the left of the Rice's Station road, facing them north toward and some little distance from Sailor's Creek, supporti directions the Sixth Corps had been following my route of march since the discovery, about 9 o'clock in the morning, that Lee had decamped from Amelia Court House. Grant had promptly informed me of this in a note, saying. The Sixth Corps will go ut two miles, part of the Sixth Corps following to clinch a victory which not only led to the annihilation of one corps of Lee's retreating army, but obliged Longstreet to move up to Farmville, so as to take a road north of the Appomattox River towa
s of cars at the depot loaded with supplies for Lee's army; these had been sent from Lynchburg, in depot, feeling their way along, in ignorance of Lee's exact position. As he had the original despak pains to dwell upon the pitiable condition of Lee's army, he had little difficulty in persuading y beyond the village the bivouac undoubtedly of Lee's army. The troops did not seem to be disposedr that while such discussions are going on, General Lee should have continued his march and attempting. I will entertain no terms except that General Lee shall surrender to General Grant on his arrneral Meade's lines back on the road over which Lee had been retreating. General Longstreet rentox Station and established a line intercepting Lee: cavalry headquarters, April 8, 1865-9:20 P. Me re-entered General Grant was writing; and General Lee, having in his hand two depatches, which I er the fighting had been stopped, notifying General Lee that some of his cavalry in front of Crook [25 more...]
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