hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 60 results in 18 document sections:

1 2
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
ing a great nation. Certain it is, the Navy has been brought to so low an ebb that it almost seems as if this state of affairs had been produced by some concert of action. The best illustration of what the Navy had accomplished up to the close of the year 1863 is afforded by the official reports of the commanding officers of squadrons and single ships; but, as these cannot be embodied in a narrative of this kind, we must content ourselves with an abstract from the records. Acting-Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, in command of the North Atlantic squadron, ably seconded by the zeal of his officers, had penetrated the waters of Virginia wherever his gun-boats could reach, and had occupied the sounds of North Carolina to such an extent that the Confederates could be said to have no foothold in that quarter. Wilmington, near the mouth of the Cape Fear River, was really the only point in North Carolina where the enemy could boast that they had defied the Federal arms, and this point was foun
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
erior numbers. The whole country, although it lost men enough to have made a dozen large armies, gained greatly in prestige, and taught Europe that our people united were a match for all their powers combined. In February, 1864, Acting-Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, commanding the North Atlantic squadron, was in co-operation with Major-General B. F. Butler, who commanded the army of the James with his headquarters at Fortress Monroe. General Meade commanded the Army of the Potomac, with his headble vessels of the squadron. Pardon me if I have overstepped any line of duty or courtesy in this latter suggestion. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Benj. F. Butler, Major General Commanding. Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. This diplomatic communication of General Butler led to a long correspondence between Acting Rear-Admiral Lee and himself, which ended, as it should have done, in putting the obstructions in the cha
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 40: (search)
, with the expression of my views, to you the manner of executing it. All assaults are exposed service, but this assault has with much real risk less than appears. Wishing you success and promotion, I have the honor to be, etc., etc., S. P. Lee. To Captain Melancton Smith, U. S. Navy. In the coming times, these quaint dispatches of the year 1864, issued by the old salts of the Navy, will doubtless be looked upon much as we now regard the lucubrations of Admiral Benbow and his contin the sounds was reinforced by some additional vessels and placed under the command of Commander William H. Macomb, an officer fully competent to perform the duties required of him. North Atlantic Squadron, January 1, 1864. Acting-Rear-Admiral, Samuel P. Lee. Fleet-Captain, Lieutenant-Commander John S. Barnes. Steam frigate Minnesota--Flag-ship. Lieutenant-Commander, John H. Upshur; Lieutenant, Jos. P. Fyffe; Fleet Surgeon, W. Maxwell Wood; Assistant Surgeons, G. S. Franklin, W. S
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
ke, by his own account, was in the advance during the hardest of General Lee's fighting, having joined him with orders to press the fighting. From Lee he returned to General Banks at Pleasant Hill, and gave it as his opinion that Lee was in a dangerous position, at least eight milLee was in a dangerous position, at least eight miles from infantry support, in immediate presence of a superior force, and that he would be attacked by daylight. He thought Lee should be reiLee should be reinforced by one infantry brigade! but says nothing about Lee's being helped out of the scrape until the main body of the army should come up,Lee's being helped out of the scrape until the main body of the army should come up, notwithstanding Banks had expressed his surprise that the advance-guard had not been composed of infantry, cavalry and artillery. In all thelayed until the 13th, at which time the advance, under General A. L Lee, left Franklin, the whole column following soon after and arriving aas occupied without opposition on the 16th of the same month. General Lee, of my command, arrived at Alexandria on the morning of the 19th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
istress for the want of food to supply their armies, and at one time there was a prospect of their being starved into submission, even without victories by the Federal armies. In the early part of May there were on hand but two days rations for Lee's army at Richmond, and on the 23d of June only thirteen days rations, showing how the Navy had cut off the foreign supply; and to meet the demand, and keep the Confederate army from disbanding, the Commissary-General had to offer market rates for seen, and it was also recognized that, in order to obtain it, it would be necessary to break the blockade by some means then untried or unknown. Nor was the transportation adequate to the demands of the occasion. The supply of fresh meat to General Lee's army was precarious, and, if the army fell back from Richmond and Petersburg, there was every probability that it would cease to exist altogether. This condition of affairs was brought about by the vigilance of the Federal Navy, which wor
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
was assigned to the command of the North Atlantic squadron on the 5th instant; but the necessity of rest on the part of that distinguished officer renders it necessary that he should come immediately North. You will therefore, on the receipt of this order, consider yourself detached from the command of the Mississippi squadron, and you will turn over the command, temporarily, to Captain A. M. Pennock. As soon as the transfer can be made, proceed to Beaufort, N. C., and relieve Acting-Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, in command of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Take with you your personal staff, and a number of officers, not exceeding five, may be transferred from the Mississippi to the North Atlantic squadron. Under the above orders, Rear-Admiral Porter assumed command of the North Atlantic squadron, and visited City Point, Va., in company with Mr. Fox, Assistant-Secretary of the Navy, to confer with General Grant in regard to the necessary contingent of troops required to co-
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
the admiral and other officers. cases of individual feats of heroism. casualties. evacuation of forts along Cape Fear River. capture of Smithville. list of guns mounted in chain of forts. bombardment and capture of forts Anderson, strong and Lee. Scrimmage with infernal machines. capture of Wilmington, N. C. firing national salutes. additional reports of officers. operations after capture of Fort Fisher. Confederate gun-boats and their movements in James River. Miscellaneous operatnd well-directed fire,which was returned with great vigor for half an hour. The Confederate fire then gradually ceased. They left the fort and retreated to Wilmington. The Army Lieutenant-Commander John S. Barnes, Chief-of-staff with Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, and commanding U. S. S. Lenapee. in Cape Fear River, after the attack on Fort Fisher. came up half an hour afterwards and found the fort in possession of the Navy. In this day's fight the loss was only two killed and six wounded on the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 55: operations of the Mississippi Squadron in the latter part of 1864 and in 1865. (search)
Chapter 55: operations of the Mississippi Squadron in the latter part of 1864 and in 1865. Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee takes command. loss of the tin-clad Undine. burning of the gun-boats Towah, Key West and Elfin. operations of thederate property at Shreveport. list of vessels and officers of the Mississippi Squadron, 1865. Acting-rear-admiral. S. P. Lee, who followed Rear-Admiral Porter in October, 1864, in the command of the Mississippi Squadron, was not fortunate on hithanks for your cordial co-operation during the operations of the past thirty days. G. H. Thomas, Major-General. Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, Commanding Mississippi Squadron, Chickasaw, Alabama. These were about the last important events in the histoer of recruits in that quarter obtained for the Federal Army. Mississippi Squadron, January, 1865. Acting Rear-Admiral Samuel P. Lee, Commanding. Staff Lieutenant-Commander C. A. Babcock, Acting-Fleet-Captain; Lieutenant F. J. Naile
1 2