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The Daily Dispatch: April 13, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 28, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Hand-to-hand fighting at Spotsylvania. (search)
the rear of the works, were completely gnawed off by our converging fire, and about 3 o'clock in the day fell among the enemy with a loud crash. The stump of one of these trees is preserved in Washington. In his official report, Brigadier-General Samuel McGowan, who commanded a brigade in Wilcox's Confederate division, says: To give some idea of the intensity of the fire, an oak-tree twenty-two inches in diameter, which stood just in rear of the right of the brigade, was cut down by the conand broken foliage were strewn about. With much labor a. detail of Union soldiers buried the dead by simply turning the captured breastworks upon them. Thus had these unfortunate victims unwittingly dug their own graves. The Confederate General McGowan officially says: The trenches on the right in the Bloody Angle ran with blood and had to be cleared of the dead bodies more than once.--editors. The trenches were nearly full of muddy water. It was the most horrible sight I had ever witness
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate Army. (search)
16th N. C., Col. W. A. Stowe; 22d N. C.,----; 34th N. C., Col. W. L. J. Lowrance; 38th N. C., Lieut.-Col. John Ashford. McGowan's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Samuel McGowan: 1st S. C. (Prov. Army), Lieut.-Col. W. P. Shooter; 12th S. C., Col. John L. MilleBrig.-Gen. Samuel McGowan: 1st S. C. (Prov. Army), Lieut.-Col. W. P. Shooter; 12th S. C., Col. John L. Miller; 13th S. C., Col. B. T. Brockman; 14th S. C., Col. Joseph N. Brown; 1st S. C. (Orr's) Rifles, Lieut.-Col. G. McD. Miller. Thomas's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Edward L. Thomas: 14th Ga.,----; 35th Ga.,----; 45th Ga.,----; 49th Ga., Lieut.-Col. J. T. Jord The losses of these armies are only partially reported. In the Wilderness Ewell's corps lost 1250 killed and wounded; McGowan's brigade (Wilcox's division), 481 killed, wounded, and missing; Lane's brigade (Wilcox's division), 272 killed and wounare as follows: Ewell's corps (May 10th), 650, and (May 19th), 900; Edward Johnson's division (May 12th), over 2000; and McGowan's brigade (May 12th), 86 killed, 248 wounded, and 117 missing. The following summary, aggregating 3507, exhibits the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
. Simmons; 49th Ga., Col. John T. Jordan. Lane's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James H. Lane: 7th N. C., Col. E. G. Haywood; 18th N. C., Col. J. D. Barry; 28th N. C., Capt. T. V. Apperson; 33d N. C., Col. R. V. Cowan; 37th N. C., Lieut.-Col. W. G. Morris. McGowan's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Samuel McGowan: 1st S. C. (Prov. Army), Col. C. W. McCreary; 12th S. C., Lieut.-Col. T. F. Clyburn; 13th S. C., Col. Isaac F. Hunt; 14th S. C., Col. J. N. Brown; Orr's (S. C.) Rifles, Col. G. McD. Miller. Scales's BrigadeBrig.-Gen. Samuel McGowan: 1st S. C. (Prov. Army), Col. C. W. McCreary; 12th S. C., Lieut.-Col. T. F. Clyburn; 13th S. C., Col. Isaac F. Hunt; 14th S. C., Col. J. N. Brown; Orr's (S. C.) Rifles, Col. G. McD. Miller. Scales's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Alfred M. Scales: 13th N. C., Col. J. H. Hyman; 16th N. C., Col. W. A. Stowe; 22d N. C., Col. T. S. Gallaway; 34th N. C., Col. W. L. J. Lowrance; 38th N. C., Col. John Ashford. Mahone's division, Maj.-Gen. William Mahone. Sanders's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. C. C. Sanders: 8th Ala., Col. Y. L. Royston; 9th Ala., Col. J. H. King; 10th Ala., Col. W. H. Forney; 11th Ala., Col. G. E. Tayloe; 13th Ala., Col. James Aiken; 14th Ala., Col. L. Pinckard. Weisiger's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. D. A
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Appomattox campaign. (search)
45th Ga., Col. Thomas J. Simmons; 49th Ga., Maj. James B. Duggan. Lane's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James H. Lane: 18th N. C., Maj. Thomas J. Wooten; 28th N. C., Capt. T. J. Linebarger; 33d N. C., Col. Robert V. Cowan; 37th N. C., Maj. Jackson L. Bost. McGowan's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Samuel McGowan : 1st S. C. (Prov. Army), Lieut.-Col. Andrew P. Butler; 12th S. C., Capt. J. C. Bell; 13th S. C., Col. Isaac F. Hunt; 14th S. C., Lieut.-Col. Edward Croft; Orr's S. C. Rifles, Lieut.-Col. J. T. Robertson. ScBrig.-Gen. Samuel McGowan : 1st S. C. (Prov. Army), Lieut.-Col. Andrew P. Butler; 12th S. C., Capt. J. C. Bell; 13th S. C., Col. Isaac F. Hunt; 14th S. C., Lieut.-Col. Edward Croft; Orr's S. C. Rifles, Lieut.-Col. J. T. Robertson. Scales's Brigade, Col. Joseph H. Hyman: 13th N. C., Lieut.-Col. E. B. Withers; 16th N. C., Col. William A. Stowe; 22d N. C., Col. Thomas S. Galla-way; 34th N. C., Lieut.-Col. George M. Norment; 38th N. C., Col. John Ashford, Lieut.-Col. George W. Flowers. Mahone's division, Maj.-Gen. William Mahone. Forney's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William H. Forney: 8th Ala., Lieut.-Col. John P. Emrich; 9th Ala., Maj. James M. Crow; 10th Ala., Maj. Louis W. Johnson; 11th Ala., Capt. Martin L. Stewart; 13th Ala
icksburg, division composed of the brigades of Ransom and Cook. 55W. D. PenderN. CarolinaGen. R. E. LeeMay 27, 1863.May 27, 1863.   Died July 18, 1863, from wounds received at Gettysburg; division composed of his old brigade and the brigades of McGowan, Lane and Thomas, Army of Northern Virginia. 56A. P. StewartTennesseeGen. B. BraggJune 5, 1863.June 2, 1863. Jan. 25, 1864. Promoted Lieutenant-General June 23, 1864; division composed of the brigades of Brown, Johnson, Strahl and Clayton; afteand of all the cavalry in the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, East Louisiana and West Tennessee. 58Cadmus M. WilcoxTennesseeGen. R. E. LeeAug. 13, 1863.Aug. 3, 1863. Feb. 17, 1864. Division composed of the brigades of Generals Lane, Scales, McGowan and Thomas. 59J. F. GilmerN. CarolinaGen. BeauregardAug. 16, 1863.Aug. 16, 1863. Jan. 25, 1864. Chief of the Engineer Bureau. 60Wade HamptonS. CarolinaGen. R. E. LeeSept. 3, 1863.Aug. 3, 1863. Jan. 25, 1864. Promoted Lieutenant-General; divisi<
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Brigadier-Generals of the Confederate States Army, alphabetically arranged. (search)
297McCulloch, Benj.Texas May 1, 1861.May 1, 1861.March 18, 1862. In command of Texas; also at one time of a brigade composed of the regiments of Colonels Waterhouse, Flournoy, Fitzhugh and Allen. 298McCulloch, Henry E.TexasGen. Van DornMarch 18, 1862.March 14, 1862.April 23, 1863. Brigade composed of the 1st, 12th, 13th and 14th South Carolina regiments and Orr's Rifles [succeeded General Maxy Gregg in the command], Pender's division, A. P. Hill's corps, Army of Northern Virginia. 299McGowan, SamuelS. CarolinaGen. R. E. LeeApril 23, 1863.Jan. 17, 1863.Jan. 24, 1863. Killed March 7, 1862, at Pea Ridge; commanding Missouri brigade, Price's division, Van Dorn's army. 300McIntosh, James M.Florida Jan. 24, 1862.Jan. 24, 1862.Dec. 13, 1861. Promoted Major-General May 23, 1862; brigade composed of the 15th and 32d Virginia, the 5th and, 10th Louisiana and the 10th, 50th, 53d and 57th Georgia regiments and Manly's Light Battery, Army of Northern Virginia. 301McLaws, LafayetteGeorgiaGen. <
Heyward   13thSouth CarolinaReg.---12th South Carolina VolunteersInfantryCol. Jno. L. MillerFeb 27, 1863.  Col. R. G. M. Dunnovant   Col. Dixon Barnes   Col. Cad. Jones   Col. J. L. Miller   Col. E. L. Bookler   14thSouth CarolinaReg.---13th South Carolina VolunteersInfantryCol. B. T. Brockman   Col. O. E. Edwards   Col. J. F. Hunt   15thSouth CarolinaReg.---14th South Carolina VolunteersInfantryCol. Abner PerrinFeb. 20, 1863.Promoted Brigadier-General. Col. James Jones   Col. Samuel McGowan Promoted Brigadier-General. Col. J. N. Brown   16thSouth CarolinaReg.---15th South Carolina VolunteersInfantryCol. W. D. DeSaussureSept. 9, 1861.  Col. Jos. F. Gist   Col. W. McCutchen   17thSouth CarolinaReg.---16th South Carolina VolunteersInfantryCol. Jas. McCulloughApril 29, 1862.  Col. C. J. Elford   18thSouth CarolinaReg.---17th South Carolina VolunteersInfantryCol. Jno. H. MeansDec. 19, 1861.  Col. F. W. McMaster   19thSouth CarolinaReg.---1
h's brigade joined in the chase of Taylor's men, who had been scattered by the brigades of Archer, Field and Pender. General Taylor was mortally wounded, and his command driven across Bull Run. The Confederates took 200 prisoners, and inflicted, according to the itinerary of Taylor's brigade, a very severe loss in killed, wounded and missing. The short supply of rations upon which Confederate soldiers did hard marching and harder fighting is well illustrated by this sentence from Gen. Samuel McGowan's report: In the afternoon of that day, the brigade returned to the junction (Manassas), where three days rations were issued from the vast supply of captured stores; and the men for a few hours rested and regaled themselves upon delicacies unknown to our commissariat, which they were in good condition to enjoy, having eaten nothing for several days except roasting-ears taken by order from the cornfields near the road, and what was given by the generous citizens of the Salem valley to
. Stuart formed his lines with A. P. Hill's division in front. Pender and Thomas were on the left of the plank road, Pender's right resting on the road; Lane, McGowan and Archer were on the right of the road and in the order named from the left. Lane's left was on the road. Trimble's division, under Colston, composed the secoPender lost 700 men in a few hours. General Heth reports of Lane's assault: Lane's brigade, supported by the Fortieth and Forty-seventh Virginia regiments, and McGowan's brigade, advanced and charged the enemy (behind his breastworks) who was supported by twenty-nine pieces of artillery. I cannot conceive of any body of men ever being subjected to a more galling fire than this force. The brigades of Lane, McGowan and a portion of Heth's (Colonel Brockenbrough commanding), notwithstanding, drove the enemy from his works and held them for some time, but were finally compelled to fall back, which was unavoidable from the course that affairs had assumed on
d put in to relieve Heth. This brought the brigades of Lane and Scales into the thickest of the fight. Wilcox assigned Scales and Lane to the right of the road, McGowan to the road and Thomas to his left. The two brigades on the right, says Humphreys (Lane's and Scales'), passed through Heth's lines and advanced at differenthole brigade front by a charge of unsurpassed gallantry, but the salient was still held by the enemy, and a most deadly fire poured on his right flank. Davis and McGowan then went in, and these brigades held their ground until 3 o'clock, when all were withdrawn to the new line behind the salient. General Daniel was mortally wound.. . It was there that the somewhat celebrated tree was cut down by bullets, there that the bush and logs were cut to pieces and whipped into basket stuff. General McGowan, on the Confederate side, says: Our men lay on one side of the breastworks, the enemy on the other, and in many instances men were pulled over. The trenches
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