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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 89 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 86 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 83 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 80 4 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 71 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 58 4 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 55 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 55 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 53 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Leonidas Polk or search for Leonidas Polk in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
came in sight, which proved to be a part of Bowen's division, advancing in line of battle to the support of a battery that seemed to be hard pressed, and was pouring a stream of fire into the enemy at short range. Recognizing my old friend, Cad. Polk, of Columbia, Tenn., who was the Adjutant of an Arkansas regiment, I at once fell into line with his regiment. As we crossed a little ravine and ascended the slope of the hill, the battery retired under a heavy fire of musketry through our ranks men were dropping like slaughtered beeves on both sides. A gallant officer was riding along the Confederate lines giving orders and inspiring the men by his valorous deeds and heroic courage in the face of death. It was Colonel Richmond, of General Polk's staff. My nerves grew steadier, and advancing to the front, I found myself all at once fighting in the ranks of the old One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Tennessee regiment. There was no time to look for my company, so raising my gun I took del
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 72 (search)
ary and required discipline, General Bragg, with Hardee and Polk's corps, crossed the Tennessee river at Harrison's Ferry, ns march in the rear of Buell, he sent Withers's division of Polk's corps to intercept him, whilst he, with the remainder of s stationed the division of General Smith, and had left General Polk, as the senior or ranking Major-General, in command. Oisville with Smith's troops, sufficiently supported, whilst Polk was ordered to make a flank movement, so successful in the s to be found in every household, cabinet and council. General Polk saw fit (and it may have been best; it is not for me tond hence General Bragg realized a sad disappointment by General Polk's conduct in the full fruition of his hopes—on the 4th y early dawn the next morning the left under Hardee (he and Polk being the two corps commanders) would begin the attack, conpivot. The balance of the army to our right, being part of Polk's and the entire force of Breckinridge, to remain stationar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
g's report, page 19) the right commanded by Lieutenant-General Polk, the left wing by Lieutenant-General Longst furious, but had the orders of General Bragg to General Polk, issued on the night of the 19th, to move on themy to await his advance and to move forward when he (Polk) had become engaged, been carried out, it is believeGeneral Bragg says in his letter of February 8th, if Polk had carried out his orders our independence might haday's sunrise, It was 10 o'clock A. M. before General Polk made the attack. (General Bragg's letter, February 8, 1873.) for which falterings General Polk was a few days thereafter removed from the command of his corproper to state here that some assign as a reason why Polk did not move and attack as ordered, was that he ascertained that Longstreet's right lapped his (Polk's) left front, and to have advanced would have resulted in the slaughter of our own men. General Polk's assigned reasons for his delay appears in part in the reports of
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