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Confederate cavalry leaders General Jeb Stuart leader of the Virginia cavalry Brigadier- Ninth Virginia Cavalry in Fitz Lee's Brigade under Stuart. Major-General Thomas L. Rosser, C. S. A. In Fifth Virginia Cavalry in Fitz Lee's brigade under Stuart Brigadier-General William E. Jones, C. S. A.: ace Army of the Valley. One of the regiments that Stuart eluded: lancers in the Federal cavalry. A glance men who endeavored to curb the Confederate leader, Stuart, and the resources behind them. The usual armament of this crack Pennsylvania regiment tried to catch Stuart and his fleet command. At Tunstall's Station, Virgsburg, Maryland, an hour early. On the occasion of Stuart's famous raid on Chambersburg, in October, 1862, Gecommand, were all scouring the country in search of Stuart, who was encumbered with many captured horses, but way to Gettysburg. But until the day of his death, Stuart often managed so that the Union cavalry came too ea
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of operations of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
l at Hanover Junction was opportune. General Lee was still at Spotsylvania Courthouse, thirty-five miles north. The railroad from Hanover Junction was that to which he looked for supplies of all kinds and communication with Richmond. Knowing this, General Grant had sent Sheridan, with a large cavalry force, to make a raid in Lee's rear and to destroy his communications — particularly to burn the large bridge over the South Anna river, near Hanover Junction. It was in this raid that General Jeb Stuart was killed. Breckinridge's arrival secured the bridge, and Sheridan returned without having effected other material damage. On the 22d of May, General Lee, having fallen back from Spotsylvania, arrived at Hanover Junction, and in person thanked and complimented General Breckinridge for his victory. In fact the whole Army of Northern Virginia was full of his praise. The veterans of Lee and Jackson greeted him with cheers whenever he came within sight, and wherever he moved among t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Social life in Richmond during the war. [from the Cosmopolitan, December, 1891. (search)
d learned Judah P. Benjamin: the silver-tonged orator, William L. Yancey, of Alabama; the profound logician and great constitutional lawyer, Ben. Hill, of Georgia; the able, eloquent, and benevolent Alexander H. Stephens, also of Georgia; the voluble but able Henry S. Foote, of Mississippi; the polished William Porcher Miles, of South Carolina; ex-President John Tyler, of Virginia; the present Senator Vest, of Missouri, and the proximity of the army to Richmond rendered it possible for General Jeb Stuart, A. P. Hill, John Bankhead Magruder, Joseph E. Johnston, and other officers of distinction to contribute their contingent to its brilliant intellectual life during that sanguinary period. Benjamin, Stephens, Yancey and Hill. I have never known a man socially more fascinating than Judah P. Benjamin. He was in his attainments a veritable Admiral Crichton, and I think, excepting G. P. R. James, the most brilliant, fascinating conversationalist I have ever known. He was a great so
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Nineteenth of January. (search)
tal day, to recount the valor and patriotism of their greatest chieftain, whose noblest aspiration in life found its completest realization in the doing of his duty to his God and to his fellow man. There is no danger, comrades, that the men who wore the gray will ever prove recreant to the principles that actuated them in time of war, but there is danger that our children may, and so we wish on these recurring anniversaries to tell of the chivalrous deeds of such leaders as Lee, Jackson, Stuart, and Pickett, and to teach coming generations that the soldiers of the Southern Confederacy were not rebels, but were Americans who loved constitutional liberty as something dearer than life itself. The orator. Dr. R. L. Mason, rector of Grace Episcopal church, who is a member of Lee Camp, was then introduced and offered a fervent prayer. Rev. George H. Ray, pastor of Union-Station Methodist Church, also an old veteran, was presented to the assemblage as the orator of the day. He s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the statue of General Ambrose Powell Hill at Richmond, Virginia, May 30, 1892. (search)
t it is for me always a peculiar pleasure to attend a Confederate gathering in historic, battle-scarred heroic old Richmond, and to mingle with the men who followed Lee and Jackson and Longstreet and Ewell and A. P. Hill [great applause], and Jeb Stuart; the men who composed the Army of Northern Virginia, the noblest army of heroic patriots that ever marched under any flag, or fought for any cause, in all the tide of time. A happy task to discharge. And yet a still greater happiness is mnd became as well known throughout the Army of Northern Virginia as its first loved commander. Of this regiment General Lee said: It is a splendid body of men. General Ewell said: It is the only regiment in my command that never fails. General Jeb Stuart said: It always does exactly what I tell it. And General Early said: They can do more hard fighting and be in better plight afterwards than any troops I ever saw. From Harper's Ferry to Appomattox this splendid body of men carried the b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
Baltimore, Md., sun, December, 1901.] How General Jeb. Stuart lost his life in Recapturing a borrowed Maryland Battery. Shortly after midnight I received the following from General Jeb Stuart, who was then at Taylorsville, a mile and a half disock A. M., 1864. To Colonel B. T. Johnson: Colonel,—General Stuart directs me to say that he would be glad to obtain one is interposed between the enemy and Hanover Junction. General Stuart will return the battery as soon as the present emergenhey had orders to start at 12 o'clock to-night (over). General Stuart is now moving down the Telegraph road, and desires youing this request I rode at once to Taylorsville to see General Stuart. He was lying flat on his back, his head on a saddle, army in guns, horses, harness, and men, and that I wanted Stuart to be very careful of the one I sent him, which was the pis. During the morning I received the following from General Stuart, which was, I think, the last word he ever wrote, for
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.25 (search)
Baltimore, Md., sun, December, 1901.] How General Jeb. Stuart lost his life in Recapturing a borrowed Maryland Battery. Shortly after midnight I received the following from General Jeb Stuart, who was then at Taylorsville, a mile and a half disock A. M., 1864. To Colonel B. T. Johnson: Colonel,—General Stuart directs me to say that he would be glad to obtain one is interposed between the enemy and Hanover Junction. General Stuart will return the battery as soon as the present emergenhey had orders to start at 12 o'clock to-night (over). General Stuart is now moving down the Telegraph road, and desires youing this request I rode at once to Taylorsville to see General Stuart. He was lying flat on his back, his head on a saddle, army in guns, horses, harness, and men, and that I wanted Stuart to be very careful of the one I sent him, which was the pis. During the morning I received the following from General Stuart, which was, I think, the last word he ever wrote, for
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