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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 5, chapter 108 (search)
he following events took place. When Onesilus of Salamis was besieging the Amathusians, news was brought him that Artybius, a Persian, was thought to be coming to Cyprus with a great Persian host. Upon hearing this, Onesilus sent heralds all through Ionia to summon the people, and the Ionians, after no long deliberation, came withliberation, came with a great force. So the Ionians were in Cyprus when the Persians, crossing from Cilicia, marched to Salamis by land, and the Phoenicians were sailing around the headland which is called the keys of Cyprus.“The promontory (Cap St. Andre) at the end of the long tongue of land now ‘the Carpass’” (How and Wells). liberation, came with a great force. So the Ionians were in Cyprus when the Persians, crossing from Cilicia, marched to Salamis by land, and the Phoenicians were sailing around the headland which is called the keys of Cyprus.“The promontory (Cap St. Andre) at the end of the long tongue of land now ‘the Carpass’” (H
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 5, chapter 109 (search)
In this turn of affairs, the tyrants of Cyprus called together the generals of the Ionians, and said to them: “Ionians, we Cyprians offer you the choice of engaging either the Persians or the Phoenicians. If you want to draw up your army on land and try your strength against the Persians, then it is time for you to disembark and in your ships to contend with the Phoenicians. If, however, you desire rather to engage the Phoenicians, do so, but whichever you choose, see to it that Ionia and Cyprus become free.” To this the Ionians answered, “We were sent by the common voice of Ionia to guard the seas, not to deliver our ships to men of Cyprus and encounter ere sent by the common voice of Ionia to guard the seas, not to deliver our ships to men of Cyprus and encounter the Persians on land. We will attempt then to bear ourselves bravely in the task which was given us. It is for you to prove yourselves valiant men, remembering what you suffered when you were enslaved by the Media
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 5, chapter 113 (search)
It was in this way that Artybius the Persian general, together with his horse, fell. While the rest were still fighting, Stesenor the ruler of Curium, allegedly an Argive settlement, played the traitor with great company of men under him. The war-chariots of the Salaminians immediately followed their lead, and the Persians accordingly gained the upper hand over the Cyprians. So the army was routed, and many were slain, among them Onesilus, son of Chersis, who had contrived the Cyprian revolt, as well as the king of the Solians, Aristocyprus son of Philocyprus, that Philocyprus whom Solon of Athens, when he came to Cyprus, extolled in a poem above all other tyrants.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 5, chapter 115 (search)
This the Amathusians did, and have done to this day. When, however, the Ionians engaged in the sea-battle off Cyprus learned that Onesilus' cause was lost and that the cities of Cyprus, with the exception of Salamis which the Salaminians had handed over to their former king Gorgus, were besieged, they sailed off to Ionia without delay. Soli was the Cyprian city which withstood siege longest; the Persians took it in the fifth month by digging a mine under its walls. This the Amathusians did, and have done to this day. When, however, the Ionians engaged in the sea-battle off Cyprus learned that Onesilus' cause was lost and that the cities of Cyprus, with the exception of Salamis which the Salaminians had handed over to their former king Gorgus, were besieged, they sailed off to Ionia without delay. Soli was the Cyprian city which withstood siege longest; the Persians took it in the fifth month by digging a mine under its walls.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 7, chapter 98 (search)
After the admirals, the most famous of those on board were these: from Sidon, Tetramnestus son of Anysus; from Tyre, Matten son of Siromus; from Aradus, Merbalus son of Agbalus; from Cilicia, Syennesis son of Oromedon; from Lycia, Cyberniscus son of Sicas; from Cyprus, Gorgus son of Chersis and Timonax son of Timagoras; and from Caria, Histiaeus son of Tymnes, Pigres son of Hysseldomus, and Damasithymus son of Candaules.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The woorthy voiage of Richard the first, K. of England into Asia, for the recoverie of Jerusalem out of the hands of the Saracens, drawen out of the booke of Acts and Monuments of the Church of England, written by M. John Foxe. (search)
ene of Sicily, and Berengaria the king of Navars daughter, with two ships were driven to the Ile of Cyprus. The king making great mone for the ships of his sister, and Berengaria his wife that sh whom he should marry, who at length were found safe and merry at the port of Lymszem in the Ile of Cyprus, notwithstanding the two other ships, which were in their company before in the same haven, rom his keepers, was againe at defiance with the King: whereupon king Richard besetting the Iland of Cyprus round about with shippes and gallies, did in such sort prevaile, that the subjects of the lof Tripolis. These things thus done, and all set in order touching the possession of the Ile of Cyprus, the keeping whereof he committed to Radulphe soone of Godfrey Lord Chamberlaine, being then the first day of June upon the fift of the saide moneth, king Richard departed from the Ile of Cyprus, with his shippes and gallies toward the siege of Achon, and on the next morrowe came to Tyrus
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. John Locke to Jerusalem. (search)
t we drew to the East end of the Iland. The 9 and 10 we sayled along with a prosperous winde and saw no land. The 11 in the morning, we had sight of the Iland of Cyprus, and towards noone we were thwart the Cape called Ponta Malota, and about foure of the clocke we were as farre as Baffo, and about sunne set we passed Cavo Bihen as tarying upon his owne businesse, he would colour it with the delay of the pilgrimes. The 14. day in the morning we set saile, and lost sight of the Island of Cyprus, and the 15. day we were likewise at Sea, and sawe no land: and the 16. day towards night, we looked for land, but we sawe none. But because we supposed our and not being able to rise againe died there. The 23. 24. and 25. we sailed our direct course with a small gale of winde, and this day we had sight of the Island of Cyprus. The first land that we discovered was a headland called Cavo de la Griega, and about midnight we ankered by North of the Cape. This cape is a high hil, long
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyages and Navigations of the English nation to Virginia , and the severall discoveries therof chiefly at the charges of the honourable Sir Walter Ralegh knight, from 33 to 40 degrees of latitude: together with the successe of the English colonies there planted: as likewise a description of the Countrey, with the Inhabitants, and the manifold commodities. Whereunto are annexed the patents, letters, discourses, &c. to this part belonging. (search)
ne also of this Countrey of Virginia, extending some wayes so many hundreds of leagues, as otherwise then by the relation of the inhabitants wee have most certaine knowledge of, where yet no Christian prince hath any possession or dealing, cannot but yeelde many kinds of excellent commodities, which we in our discovery have not yet seene. What hope there is els to bee gathered of the nature of the Climate, being answerable to the Iland of Japan, the land of China , Persia , Jury, the Ilands of Cyprus and Candy, the South parts of Greece , Italy and Spaine, and of many other notable and famous Countreys, because I meane not to be tedious, I leave to your owne consideration. Whereby also the excellent temperature of the aire there at all seasons, much warmer then in England , and never so vehemently hot, as sometimes is under and betweene the Tropikes, or neere them, cannot be knowen unto you without further relation. For the holsomnesse thereof I neede to say but thus much: th
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe and true report of the new found land of Virginia : of the commodities there found, and to be raised, aswell merchantable as others: Written by Thomas Heriot, servant to Sir Walter Ralegh, a member of the Colony, and there imployed in discovering a full twelvemoneth. (search)
ne also of this Countrey of Virginia, extending some wayes so many hundreds of leagues, as otherwise then by the relation of the inhabitants wee have most certaine knowledge of, where yet no Christian prince hath any possession or dealing, cannot but yeelde many kinds of excellent commodities, which we in our discovery have not yet seene. What hope there is els to bee gathered of the nature of the Climate, being answerable to the Iland of Japan, the land of China , Persia , Jury, the Ilands of Cyprus and Candy, the South parts of Greece , Italy and Spaine, and of many other notable and famous Countreys, because I meane not to be tedious, I leave to your owne consideration. Whereby also the excellent temperature of the aire there at all seasons, much warmer then in England , and never so vehemently hot, as sometimes is under and betweene the Tropikes, or neere them, cannot be knowen unto you without further relation. For the holsomnesse thereof I neede to say but thus much: th
ne also of this Countrey of Virginia, extending some wayes so many hundreds of leagues, as otherwise then by the relation of the inhabitants wee have most certaine knowledge of, where yet no Christian prince hath any possession or dealing, cannot but yeelde many kinds of excellent commodities, which we in our discovery have not yet seene. What hope there is els to bee gathered of the nature of the Climate, being answerable to the Iland of Japan, the land of China , Persia , Jury, the Ilands of Cyprus and Candy, the South parts of Greece , Italy and Spaine, and of many other notable and famous Countreys, because I meane not to be tedious, I leave to your owne consideration. Whereby also the excellent temperature of the aire there at all seasons, much warmer then in England , and never so vehemently hot, as sometimes is under and betweene the Tropikes, or neere them, cannot be knowen unto you without further relation. For the holsomnesse thereof I neede to say but thus much: th
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