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Browsing named entities in Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. You can also browse the collection for England (Arkansas, United States) or search for England (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A compendious and briefe declaration of the journey of M. Anth. Jenkinson, from the famous citie of London into the land of Persia, passing in this same journey thorow Russia , Moscovia, and Mare Caspium, alias Hircanum, sent and imployed therein by the right worshipfull Societie of the Merchants Adventurers, for discoverie of Lands, Islans, &c. Being begun the foureteenth day of May, Anno 1561, and in the third yere of the reigne of the Queenes Majestie that now is: this present declaration being directed and written to the foresayd Societie. (search)
ervitors of the Court, to cary before me, for none of my company or servants might be suffered to enter into the Court with me, my interpreter onely excepted. Thus comming before his Majestie with such reverence as I thought meete to be used, I delivered the Queenes Majesties letters with my present, which hee accepting, demaunded of mee of what countrey of Franks I was, and what affaires I had there to doe? Unto whom I answered that I was of the famous Citie of London within the noble Realme of England, and that I was sent thither from the most excellent and gracious soveraigne Lady Elizabeth Queene of the saide Realme for to treate of friendship, and free passage of our Merchants and people, to repaire and traffique within his dominions, for to bring in our commodities, and to carry away theirs to the honour of both princes, the mutuall commoditie of both Realmes, and wealth of the Subjects, with other wordes here omitted. He then demaunded me in what language the letters were writ
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, An Act for the corporation of Merchants adventurers for the discovering of new trades, made in the eight yeere of Queene Elizabeth. Anno 1566. (search)
f Merchants adventurers for the discovering of new trades, made in the eight yeere of Queene Elizabeth. Anno 1566. WHEREAS divers very good Subjects of this Realme of England in the latter ende of the reigne of the late right high and mightie prince our Soveraigne Lord king Edward the sixt, at the gracious encouragement, and rightnture, and to their exceeding great charges, for the glory of God, the honor and increase of the revenues of the Crowne, and the common utilitie of the whole Realme of England, set forth three ships for the discovery by Sea, of Isles, lands, territories, dominions, and Seigniories unknowen, and by the Subjects of the sayd late kingded also, and be it enacted, that no maner of person or persons shall from henceforth carrie or transport, or cause to bee carried or transported out of this Realme of England, any maner of clothes or karsies into any of the partes where the said fellowship and societie is priviledged to trade by this Act, before the same clothes
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Notes concerning this fourth voyage into Persia, begun in the moneth of July 1568. gathered by M. Richard Willes from the mouth of Master Arthur Edwards, which was Agent in the same. (search)
any such countrey? But when Edwards saw that none of them had any intelligence of that name, he named it Inghilterra , as the Italians call England. Then one of the noble men said Londro, meaning thereby London, which name is better knowen in far countries out of Christendom, then is the name of England. When Edwards heard him name Londro, he said that that was the name of the chiefe citie of England, as was Teveris of the chiefe city of Persia. He asked him many things more, as of the realme of England, marvelling that it should be an Island of so great riches and power, as Edwards declared unto him: of the riches & abundance of our merchandize he further understood by our traffike in Moscovia and other countreis. He demanded also many things of the Queenes majestie, and of the customes and lawes of the realme: saying oftentimes in his owne language, Bara colla, (that is to say) Well sayd. He asked also many things of king Philip, & of his wars against the Turke at Malta . Then he d
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The deposition of M. William Burrough to certaine Interrogatories ministred unto him concerning the Narve, Kegor, &c. to what king or prince they doe appertaine and are subject, made the 23 of June, 1576. These articles seeme to have bene ministred upon the quarel between Alderman Bond the elder, and the Moscovie company, for his trade to the Narve without their consent. (search)
m, that there is not any such river or creek of fresh water which falleth out of the said countrey of Lappia into the sea, between the said abbey Pechingo, and the bay of S. Nicholas, but they are all and every of them farmed out, and the Emperour receiveth the rent for them. Item, whether as well before, as also within the memorie of men, till the time of the graunt of the said letters patents any of the English merchants (saving the merchants of the said societie) subjects of this realme of England, have commonly exercised or frequented businesse or trade in the said villages or townes called the Narve, Kegor, Pechingo, and Cola, or in any of them, or in any ports or territories of the said Emperour of Russia. To this Interrogatorie the Deponent answereth, that the subjects of this realme before the graunt of the said letters patents did not commonly exercise, neither frequent or trade to any of the said places called the Narve, Kegor, Pechingo or Cola, or to any of them.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Queenes Majesties letters to the Lord Boris Pheodorowich. (search)
ne and continued towards us, whereof our princely nature will never be unmindfull. We have bene also from time to time made acquainted by our chiefe and principall Counsellour William Lord Burghley, Lord high Treasurour of our Highnesse Realme of England, of your letters which have passed betweene your Lordship and him, concerning the entercourse of our Merchants trafficke in your Countreys, and of the honourable offices done by your Lordship with the Emperour in favour of our sayd Marchantlour and directour of the state of so great a Monarchie, whereby your advice and direction is followed in all things that doe concerne the same, we have given order to our sayd principall Counsellour William Lord Burghley, treasurour of our Realme of England, that as any occasion shall arise to the hinderance of the entercourse betweene these Countreyes, or of the priviledges graunted by his Majestie to our merchants, that he may by advertisement treat with your Lordshippe thereupon: which we b
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The miraculous victory atchieved by the English Fleete, under the discreet and happy conduct of the right honourable, right prudent, and valiant lord, the L. Charles Howard, L. high Admirall of England, &c. Upon the Spanish huge Armada sent in the yeere 1588. for the invasion of England, together with the wofull and miserable successe of the said Armada afterward, upon the coasts of Norway , of the Scottish Westerne Isles, of Ireland , of Spaine, of France, and of England, &c. Recorded in Latine by Emanuel van Meteran in the 15. booke of his history of the low Countreys. (search)
is minde, and having consulted thereabout with the Pope, set foorth and undertooke against England and the low Countreys. To the end that he might subdue the Realme of England, and reduce it unto his catholique Religion, and by that meanes might be sufficiently revenged for the disgrace, contempt and dishonour, which hee (having 34evill at all passages lay in ambush like a thiefe, no whit regarding such letters of safe conduct. Some there be which affirme that the Pope had bestowed the realme of England with the title of Defensor fidei, upon the king of Spaine, giving him charge to invade it upon this condition, that hee should enjoy the conquered realm, ao the sea of Rome. To this purpose the said Pope proffered a million of gold, the one halfe thereof to be paied in readie money, and the other halfe when the realme of England or any famous port thereof were subdued. And for the greater furtherance of the whole businesse, he dispatched one D. Allen an English man (whom hee had ma
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Divers of the honourable family of the Beauchamps, with Robert Curtoys sonne of William the Conqueror, made a voyage to Jerusalem 1096. Hol. pag. 22. vol. 2. (search)
Divers of the honourable family of the Beauchamps, with Robert Curtoys sonne of William the Conqueror, made a voyage to Jerusalem 1096. Hol. pag. 22. vol. 2. POPE URBANE calling a councell at Clermont in Auvergne , exhorted the Christian princes so earnestly to make a journey into the Holy land, for the recovery thereof out of the Saracens hands, that the saide great and generall journey was concluded upon to be taken in hand, wherein many noble men of Christendome went under the leading of Godfrey of Bouillon & others, as in the Chronicles of France, of Germanie, and of the Holy land doeth more plainely appeare. There went also among other divers noble men foorth of this Realme of England, specially that worthily bare the surname of Beauchampe.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of William Longespee Earle of Sarisburie into Asia, in the yeere 1248, and in the 32 yeere of the reigne of Henry the third, king of England. (search)
would suffer him) would in his owne person visit the Holy land: which matter was opened and debated in the Parliament of France held in the yeere 1247. Where at length it was concluded, that the king according to his vow should take his journey into Asia, and the time thereof was also prefixed, which should be after the feast of S. John Baptist the next yeere ensuing. At which time William Longespee a worthie warrior, with the bishop of Worcester and certaine other great men in the Realme of England (mooved with the example of the Frenchmen) prepared themselves likewise to the same journey. It fell out in this enterprise, that about the beginning of October, the French king assaulted and tooke Damiata, being the principall fort or hold of the Saracens in all Egypt , Anno 1249. and having fortified the Citie with an able garrison left with the Duke of Burgundie, he remooved his tents from thence to goe Eastward. In whose armie followed William Longspee, accompanied with a pi
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyage of Prince Edward the sonne of king Henry the third into Asia in the yeere 1270. (search)
lord John Voisie, And doe you also faithfully love your Lord and Prince? Who answered both, Yea undoubtedly. Then sayth he, take you away this gentlewoman and lady (meaning his wife) and let her not see her lord and husband, till such time as I will you thereunto. Whereupon they tooke her from the princes presence, crying out, and wringing her hands. Then sayd they unto her, Be you contented good Lady & Madame, it is better that one woman should weepe a little while, then that all the realme of England should weepe a great season. Then on the morrow they cut out all the dead and invenimed flesh out of the princes arme, and threw it from them, and sayd unto him: how cheereth your Grace, we promise you within these fifteene dayes you shall shew your selfe abroad (if God permit) upon your horsebacke, whole and well as ever you were. And according to the promise he made the prince, it came to passe, to the no little comfort and admiration of all his subjects. When the great Souldan
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A preparation of a voyage of King Henrie the fourth to the Holy land against the infidels in the yere 1413, being the last yere of his reigne: wherein he was prevented by death: written by Walsingham, Fabian, Polydore Virgile, and Holenshed. (search)
that I shall die here in this chamber, according to the prophesie of mee declared, that I should depart this life in Jerusalem. Afterward, King Henry, calling to minde, that nothing ought to be more highly esteemed by any man, then to doe the utmost of his indevour for the performance of justice, which tendeth to the good and benefite of mankinde; altogether abandoning civill warre (wherewith he was ashamed to see, how Christians at all times were dishonourably busied) entered into a more deepe consideration of well governing his Realme of England, of waging warre against the common enemie, and of recovering, in processe of time, the citie of Jerusalem, yea, and was providing a navie for the same purpose, whenas in the very midst of this his heroicall action and enterprise, he was surprised with death: for falling into a sudden disease, he could not be cured by any kinde of physicke. He deceased at Westminster in the 46 yeare of his age, which was in the yeere of our Lord, 1413.
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