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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 3 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 1 1 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 30 (search)
16th, we receive orders to move; pass through the works of the enemy to Resaca. Here we halt for dinner, then move on and camp four miles south of the town. The next day we pass through Calhoun. At the town of Adairsville the enemy holds his position till darkness again gives him an opportunity to escape. 18th, pass through Adairsville. On the 19th again came upon the enemy. One company is deployed as skirmishers, who push forward, driving the enemy before them, till near the town of Cassville; 1 sergeant is seriously wounded. At night form line and build works. Here we rest until noon of May 23, when we are moving southward; cross the Etowah River, and encamp about three miles south of it. The next day move on through mud and woods and rain and reach Burnt Hickory Ridge at about 2 a. m. of the 24th. The next morning at 9.30 have orders to move. We push on toward Dallas, while we hear heavy firing. Form line of battle, the Seventy-fifth in second line, and take no active pa
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
Kingstoll and encamped for the night. On the 19th drove the enemy about ten miles, passing through the village of Kingston. and encamped within one mile of Cassville, Ga. Our division was in front and had considerable skirmishing. May 20, built a line of works in front of the position we occupied the night before, and remained there during the day. May 21 and 22, still in camp near Cassville, Ga. May 23, left camp near Cassville at 1,30 p. m.; we reached Cartersville at 10 p. m. and encamped for the night. Moved on the morning of the 24th at 6 a. m., and marched nearly all day in a southerly direction, crossing the Etowah River about 4 p. in.; marchedCassville at 1,30 p. m.; we reached Cartersville at 10 p. m. and encamped for the night. Moved on the morning of the 24th at 6 a. m., and marched nearly all day in a southerly direction, crossing the Etowah River about 4 p. in.; marched about eight miles and encamped for the night. May 25, left camp at 6 o'clock and marched about five miles in a southerly direction, reaching camp about 10 p. m. May 26, left camp at 9.30 a. m., and marched in a southeasterly direction. We hastened to re-enforce General Hooker. The enemy having made a stand near Dallas, Cobb Co
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 33 (search)
he enemy some four miles, but after two hours fighting he again retreated, having been dislodged by a charge. At 8 p. m. firing ceased, when I was ordered to bivouac for the night. Nothing of importance took place from this until arriving about five miles this side of Kingston on the 19th, when we again encountered the enemy. I was ordered to form line and build works, which I did. Here I remained until 2 a. m. of the 25th, when I moved with brigade in eastern direction and camped near Cassville, which was then occupied by our troops. On the 26th we again moved in a southeast direction, after which nothing of importance took place until 5 p. m., when I crossed Pumpkin Vine Creek, near Dallas, and took position in rear of the Second Division. Here a slight skirmish occurred. I lay still until the morning of 26th. At 9 a.. m. the brigade took position in reserve, my regiment forming in rear of the Eighty-fourth Illinois, and supporting the battery of our brigade. On the morning
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
nd at 4 p.m. crossed the river and marched four miles, where we encamped for the night. On Tuesday, May 17, we marched at 8 a. m., and encamped within two miles of Adairsville. On Wednesday, May 18, the regiment marched at 6 a. m., passed through Adairsville, and six miles beyond encamped for the night. On Thursday, May 19, the regiment marched at 6 a. m.; came up with the enemy's rear guard at Kingston, where we commenced skirmishing, and so continued until the enemy was driven back to Cassville. This regiment lost during the day I enlisted man killed and 3 wounded. On Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, 20th, 21st, and 22d, the regiment lay in camp. On Monday, May 23, we marched west six miles, where we crossed the Etowah River, and continuing the march four miles farther encamped for the night. On Tuesday, May 24, the regiment moved out of camp at 6 a. m., and marched fifteen miles and encamped. On Wednesday, May 25, the regiment left camp at 10 a. m. and marched about eight mile
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
moved to rear and bivouacked for the night. In the fight the regiment lost I commissioned officer wounded, 1 enlisted man killed, and 29 enlisted men wounded. May 18, during the night the enemy evacuated his position in our immediate front. Marched at 8 a. m., passing through the village of Adairsville during the forenoon, camping at dark near the railroad. May 19, marched at 7 a. m., passed through Kingston at noon, formed line of battle about 3 p. mn., advanced to within two miles of Cassville, bivouacking at 10 p. m. Constant skirmishing during the day. Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball, in compliance with orders from General Thomas, relieved Colonel Sherman in command of the brigade May 22. The regiment remained at this point at rest until 12 noon of the 23d instant, when it marched in a southwesterly direction, crossing the Etowah River at 10 p. m., camping at midnight four miles beyond the river. May 24, marched at 6 a. m., moving slowly and with frequent halts, camping at 8 p. m.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
front. The artillery fire was evidently effective, for the enemy very soon began to withdraw. Our advance was immediately resumed. Within a mile and a half of Cassville the enemy was afresh encountered in an intrenched position. Our order of battle was promptly reformed, and the advance resumed with a view to forcing our way into Cassville, but darkness falling suddenly upon us rendered it necessary to desist from a farther advance against an intrenched position over unexplored ground. The Seventeenth Kentucky was deployed as skirmishers to cover the advance of its brigade, and suffered quite severely in the advance late in the afternoon, more than 20 cline bearing unmistakable evidence of the sharp fire to which it had been exposed. During the night of the 19th the enemy evacuated his works in the vicinity of Cassville, being the fourth intrenched position abandoned, and retired across the Etowah. Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, the 20th, 21st, and 22d of May, the troops rested
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
enemy was met in considerable force, this brigade being put in position on the right of the railroad, its right resting on the same and connecting on the left with General Hazen's brigade, to meet a threatened flank movement of the enemy, but did not become engaged, the enemy having fallen back during the night. The brigade continued its march with the division along the line of the railroad, passing through Adairsville on the 18th and Kingston on the 19th, to a point about one mile from Cassville, when the enemy was met in force. This brigade, being reserve for the division, was moved to different points that were threatened, but did not become engaged. The enemy having fallen back from this position on the night of the 19th, the troops remained in camp, taking rest and receiving necessary supplies, until the afternoon of the 23d, when, with twenty days rations in the supply train, it moved with the division and the entire army to the right, with a view to turning the enemy's pos
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 60 (search)
march. May 17, still following the enemy. May 18, took up position in front of the enemy; during the night of the 18th the [enemy] abandoned his intrenchments. May 19, took up line of march, passing through Kingston; overtook the enemy near Cassville intrenched; took up position, and built breastworks. May 20, 21, 22, remained in our works, the enemy in the mean time retreating southward; while remaining in our works near Cassville replenished our stores of rations, reduced baggage, and prCassville replenished our stores of rations, reduced baggage, and prepared to follow the enemy across the Etowah River to his stronghold at Atlanta. May 23, took up line of march southward, crossed the Etowah River. May 24, still going southward in pursuit. May 25, still in pursuit. May 26, deployed regiment as skirmishers; encountered the enemy's skirmishers. Casualties, 1 man wounded, since dead (see schedule, marked A). May 27, were relieved as skirmishers and immediately ordered to move to the left to form part of a column of attack on the enemy's works
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 63 (search)
he enemy had evacuated. On the 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th we were engaged in marching with pursuing column; nothing transpired worthy of mention, and having no casualties. On the evening of the 19th, the enemy being found in line of battle at Cassville, about twenty-six miles south of Resaca, the army formed line of battle and advanced upon them. Our position was on the left of the brigade in the first line, the brigade being in reserve to the Second and Third Brigades of the division, did not become closely engaged. During the night the enemy again left our front. Casualties this day, 1 enlisted man wounded. Our position remained unchanged at Cassville until the 23d, when we took up our line of march with the brigade. Marched ten miles south, crossing Etowah River, and encamped on Euharlee Creek at Milner's Mills. On 24th resumed marching; halted for the night after traveling twelve miles. On 25th continued our march, crossing Pumpkin Vine Creek, moving to the support of th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 64 (search)
about 200 yards in front, in which position we remained during the night. On the morning of the 18th, the enemy having retreated, we moved in a southerly direction, passing through Adairs---ville and Kingston on the 19th to within one mile of Cassville, where the enemy was met in force. The Fifteenth was formed in the third line as support where the line might be pressed, but did not become engaged. On the morning of the 20th we found that the enemy had evacuated his position. On the 23d a. the regiment, together with the brigade, moved to the right, taking twenty days rations in the supply train, to flank the left of the enemy's line at Allatoona Pass. We crossed the Etowah River on a wagon bridge about six miles southwest of Cassville, thence marching in a southerly direction through broken country, crossing Pumpkin Pine Creek. About 4 p. m. the 25th we heard heavy firing in front, which we found was caused by the enemy having hastily left his position in the Allatoona Moun
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