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honor to submit the following report of the movements of the Ninth army corps on the sixteenth instant, and their parts in the battle of Sharpsburgh on the seventeenth. On the evening of the fifteenth instant the Ninth army corps having been ordered away from the remainder of the right wing, was encamped in the rear of the extreme left of the whole line of the army of the Potomac, close to the hills on the south-east side of the valley of the Antietam, and on the left of the road from Rohersville to Sharpsburgh. In the afternoon of the sixteenth the whole corps, except Wilcox's division, was moved forward, and to the left and front, by command of Major-Gen. Burnside, in three columns, and took up a new position upon the rear slopes of the ridges on the left bank of the Antietam, the centre of the corps being nearly opposite the stone bridge over the stream on the above-mentioned road. The positions assigned the divisions of the command were as follows: The right front to be
honor to submit the following report of the movements of the Ninth army corps on the sixteenth instant, and their parts in the battle of Sharpsburgh on the seventeenth. On the evening of the fifteenth instant the Ninth army corps having been ordered away from the remainder of the right wing, was encamped in the rear of the extreme left of the whole line of the army of the Potomac, close to the hills on the south-east side of the valley of the Antietam, and on the left of the road from Rohersville to Sharpsburgh. In the afternoon of the sixteenth the whole corps, except Wilcox's division, was moved forward, and to the left and front, by command of Major-Gen. Burnside, in three columns, and took up a new position upon the rear slopes of the ridges on the left bank of the Antietam, the centre of the corps being nearly opposite the stone bridge over the stream on the above-mentioned road. The positions assigned the divisions of the command were as follows: The right front to be
ts and intentions of the enemy, which made it clear that it was necessary to force the passage of the South-Mountain range and gain possession of Boonsboro and Rohrersville before any relief could be afforded to Harper's Ferry. On the morning of the thirteenth I received a verbal message from Col. Miles, commanding at Harper's Porter (the latter having but one weak division present) were ordered to move by the old Sharpsburgh road, and Franklin to advance into Pleasant Valley, occupy Rohrersville, and to endeavor to relieve Harper's Ferry. Burnside and Porter, upon reaching the road from Boonsboro to Rohrersville, were to reenforce Franklin or move on Rohrersville, were to reenforce Franklin or move on Sharpsburgh, according to circumstances. Franklin moved toward Brownsville, and found there a force largely superior in numbers to his own, drawn up in a strong position to receive him. Here the total cessation of firing in the direction of Harper's Ferry indicated but too clearly the shameful and premature surrender of that post
. Anderson, was to move by Boonsborbugh and Rohrersville to carry the Maryland Heights. The signal efferson and Burkittsville upon the road to Rohrersville. I have reliable information that the mounit as soon as practicable, and debouch upon Rohrersville in order to cut off the retreat of or destrm passing the ford, you will then return by Rohrersville on the direct road to Boonsborough, if the ack. If it has succeeded, take the road to Rohrersville, to Sharpsburg and Williamsport, in order e you occupy with your command the road from Rohrersville to Harper's Ferry, placing a sufficient force at Rohrersville to hold that position in case it should be attacked by the enemy from Boonsborouguntain in Pleasant Valley, three miles from Rohrersville, Sept. 15, 8.50 A. M. general: My commanered one of his brigades and one battery to Rohrersville, or to the strongest point in its vicinity.rigade in sight. As soon as I am sure that Rohrersville is occupied I shall move forward to attack
scene of joy. The secession expedition had been an entire failure in that quarter; they received no recruits of the slightest consequence and no free — will offerings of any kind. It was soon ascertained that the main body of the enemy's forces had marched out of the city on the two previous days, taking the roads to Boonsborough and Harper's Ferry, thereby rendering it necessary to force the passes through the Catoctin and South Mountain ridges, and gain possession of Boonsborough and Rohrersville, before any relief could be extended to Col. Miles at Harper's Ferry. On the 13th an order fell into my hands issued by Gen. Lee, which fully disclosed his plans, and I immediately gave orders for a rapid and vigorous forward movement. The following is a copy of the order referred to: headquarters, Army of Northern Virginia, Sept. 9, 1862. Special Orders, No. 191. The army will resume its march to-morrow, taking the Hagerstown road. Gen. Jackson's command will form the ad
he latter command at that time consisting of but one weak division, Sykes's) by the old Sharpsburg road; and Gen. Franklin to move into Pleasant Valley, occupy Rohrersville by a detachment, and endeavor to relieve Harper's Ferry. Gens. Burnside and Porter, upon reaching the road from Boonsborough to Rohrersville, were to reinfoRohrersville, were to reinforce Franklin or to move on Sharpsburg, according to circumstances. Franklin moved towards Brownsville and found there a force of the enemy, much superior in numbers to his own, drawn up in a strong position to receive him. At this time the cessation of firing at Harper's Ferry indicated the surrender of that place. The ca and Williamsport road; the second on the Keedysville and Sharpsburg turnpike, some two and a half miles below; the third about a mile below the second, on the Rohrersville and Sharpsburg road; and the fourth near the mouth of Antietam creek, on the road leading from Harper's Ferry to Sharpsburg, some three miles below the third.
373-375 ; immediate advance to, impracticable, 385, 466 ; advance to, from Harrison's Landing, 491-497. Rich Mountain, W. Va., 61-63. Ricketts, Gen. T. B., in Pope's campaign, 509 ; South Mountain, 579-581 ; Antietam, 590. Roach, Col., 302. Robertson, Capt., at Gaines's Mill, 415, 417 ; Antietam, 601, 602. Robinson, Capt., 340. Rodgers. Corn., 287 ; at Yorktown. 314 ; Malvern. 429, 434 436, 437. Rodman, Gen. I. P., at South Mountain, 577, 578 ; Antietam, 603-605, 613. Rohrersville, Md., 561-564. 572, 584. Rosecrans, Gen. W. S., in W. Va. campaign. 59. Rossell, Col., 443. Rucker, Col. D. H., 128. Rush, Col., 303, 574. Russell, Maj. W. W., 123. Sackett, Gen. D. B., 124, 603 ; letters, 609-611. Sand-Box, Va., 254. 292. Saunders, Capt., 322. Savage's Station, Va., 366, 378, 379, 423, 424 ; battle of, 426-428. Sawtelle, Capt., 128 ; report on transports, 500. Scammon, Gen. E. P., at South Mountain, 576 ; Antietam, 603, 605, 606. Scott, Gen. W., com
dge, as it was called after Antietam, bears the name of a noted Federal general — not because of the brilliant maneuver which he vainly tried to execute in his efforts to cross it, but rather because of the gallant resistance offered here by the Confederates. General Toombs, with two Georgia regiments (the Second and the Twentieth) stood off a greatly superior force during the 16th and the greater part of the 17th of September. This bridge (on the road from Sharpsburg to Porterstown and Rohersville) was not forced till late in the afternoon, when Burnside, after a series of delays and ineffectual attempts, managed to throw his troops across Antietam Creek. The battle, however, was then practically decided. Toombs' forces saved the Confederate right wing--to him Lee and Longstreet gave the highest praise. a loss of two thousand, over three hundred left dead on the ghastly field. Franklin now sent forward some fresh troops and after obstinately fighting, the Federals finally held
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 9 (search)
ll troops arriving from New York and Fort Monroe are sent directly to Harpers Ferry unless you order differently. You will have forces sufficient to render your victory certain. My only fear now is that the enemy may escape by crossing the river. Middletown, July 9, 1863, 11 A. M. Meade to Halleck: The Army is moving in three columns, the right column having in it three Corps. The line occupied to-day with the advance will be on the other side of the mountains, from Boonsboro to Rohrersville. Two Corps will march without their artillery, the animals being completely exhausted, many falling on the road. The enemy's infantry were driven back yesterday evening from Boonsboro, or rather they retired on being pressed, towards Hagerstown. I am still under the impression that Lee's whole force is between Hagerstown and Williamsport, with an advance at Middleburg, on the road to Greencastle, observing Couch. The state of the river and the difficulty of crossing has rendered it
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 19: the battle of Antietam; I succeed Sedgwick in command of a division (search)
n The two columns of the Army of the Potomac, fighting their way through Turner's Gap and Crampton Pass and pressing their pursuit of Lee, debouched into the valley west of the mountains; one appeared at Boonsboro and the other southward at Rohrersville. The stretch of valley from Boonsboro to the Potomac is named the Antietam Valley, because the Antietam, a small river which runs near Hagerstown and a little east of Sharpsburg, enters the Potomac a few miles below. The general course of th trend. One other important highway divided the southeast angle of the other two bisecting roads; from Sharpsburg, as an apex, this road crossed the Antietam at Burnside's bridge and forked when it reached higher ground; the upper fork led to Rohrersville and the other ran south into the Harper's Ferry road. A few miles above the regular crossing was a zigzag country road --sometimes named the diagonal. It intersected the Antietam at Newkirk and passed from pike to pike. As the Antietam Ri
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