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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 21, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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any side of any question in order to injure this country. Mr. Roebuck stated the true reason of this feeling when he said that it was jealousy of our growing power; and in that statement Mr. Mosburk fully represented the British people. All we asked was for Europe to let us alone, and we would take care that Europe did let us alone England might upbraid us for being slow, out she should remember the history of the Crimes They forget the battle of Alma, on September 14, and didn't capture Sebastopol until a year afterward, and after losing more men than they originally landed. We had fought better than the Allies in the Crimes, and should fight it out regardless of what Europe said [Applause.] Our first duty in sustaining the Government was to sustain its friends in the State canvass — the nominees of the Syracuse Convention on the 24th inst. He closed with an eulogy upon the American flag. After an address from Mr. Francis Lambert, the meeting adjourned. The difficulty wit
Gibraltar and Charleston. The only naval and military operations of modern times which can at all compare with those directed against Charleston were those of Sebastopol, in 1853-'4, and those of Gibraltar, in 1781-'82. The slage of Sebastopol, with all its incidents, is fresh in the recollection of the present generation. The attack on Gibraltar, although it formed the closing scene of our first Revolutionary war, has long been consigned to its shelf in history, where it sleeps among thSebastopol, with all its incidents, is fresh in the recollection of the present generation. The attack on Gibraltar, although it formed the closing scene of our first Revolutionary war, has long been consigned to its shelf in history, where it sleeps among the neglected records of the past. Yet it was one of the most memorable events of the eighteenth century, although that century witnessed the opening scenes of the great French Revolution. The grand combined attack upon Gibraltar, by the whole power of Spain and France took plate on the 13th day of September, 1781. There were no iron-clads in those days of wooden walls, but the allies had, through the ingenuity and perseverance of the Chevalier d'aroon, the most renowned engineer of his day
either the natural or political world — a thunder storm or a battle — would bring with it some relief to the insufferable tedium of the life which this community is leading. It will not be many days, we very much suspect, before we shall have both. We think is scarcely within the range of possibility that things can remain much longer stationary at Vicksburg. Grant is said to have pushed his trenches fearfully near to our works, but as yet we are under no apprehensions. We remember Sebastopol. We remember that it was defended from the side on which it was attacked by earthworks hastily constructed, when the enemy was within a day's march of the place. We remember that Pelissier had to push his parallels within twenty yards of the Russian works, before he dared to rush, even with the grenadiers of the Imperial Guard, upon that " feu d' enfer" which be described so feelingly, and which, at that day, had never been equalled. Remembering all this, and taking into consideration t
The situation in the Southwest capture of Berwick Bay by Gen. Dick and the advance of our forces so near Orleans, are certainly circumstances to inspire the Southern heart tions of pleasure, especially as Banks to be dependent, in a great mean the country in the neighborhood of bay for his supplies, and this capture the transit. Yet every eye still con on Vicksburg — that glorious city already rivalled the fame of Sara surpassed that of Sebastopol.-- the importance of the place, from stance of its commanding the river, while it is held by us, preventing ration of our mighty empire into two parts, the pride of the whole Confederate enlisted in its behalf from the lantry with which it has been defended it fall at last — to see that tattered flag so long waved amidst the smoke of down by the hand of a Yankee foe-- noble defenders prisoners with the Yankee would be to wound the sensibilities Republic in the tenderest part. The soldier defend, the officers that comman
ement. Nothing equal to it was performed at Sebastopol. That the enlightened public of Boston o such magnificent design was carried out at Sebastopol. On the 27th instant, the rebels Longst. No such magnificent scheme was devised at Sebastopol. The rebels having cut my telegraph wirlaim that no such signal lights were used at Sebastopol. On the 28th, the rebel Generals Ewell sians nor Allies did anything of the kind at Sebastopol. On the 29th I resolved to toll the eneuch a thing was only of weekly recurrence at Sebastopol. On the 30th, I let the rebel Jackson aolled the rebels on. None of the Generals at Sebastopol acted so unfairly as did these four rebel Geoll the rebels on.--When the belligerents at Sebastopol gained a brilliant battle they held the fiel, therefore, different from anything done at Sebastopol. I flatter myself that I have seriously criheir guns. Nothing of this kind was done at Sebastopol. I am now on the banks of the majestic [1 more...]
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