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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 108 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 87 1 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 82 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 76 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 74 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 74 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 73 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 72 0 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 70 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 69 15 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Yorktown (Virginia, United States) or search for Yorktown (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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e retreat was most ably conducted. Until this day, (Monday,) the enemy seems constantly to have operated upon the supposition that our army was intending to retire to the Pamunkey. They had been deluded into this belief by the Seventeenth New-York and Eighteenth Massachusetts regiments, together with part of the First, Second and Sixth Regular cavalry, which had been sent out of Old Church on Thursday morning, to impress the enemy with that notion. (Par parenthese, they retired safely to Yorktown, and are now at Malvern Hill.) But our true object must now have become apparent, and it was vitally necessary to get the trains through before the enemy could push columns down the Charles City, Central and New-Market roads. But until eight o'clock in the morning, we had no knowledge of any but the Quaker road to the point at which we now aimed — Hardin's Landing and Malvern Hill, in Turkey Bend. Sharp reconnoissance, however, had found another, and soon our tremendous land-fleet was sail
not to be less than four hundred rounds per gun. Seventh. A siege-train of fifty pieces. This was subsequently expanded for special service at the siege of Yorktown to very nearly one hundred pieces, and comprised the unusual calibres, and enormously heavy weight of metal, of two two hundred-pounders, five one hundred-pounde must be added the field-artillery of Franklin's division of McDowell's corps, (four batteries of twenty-two guns,) which joined a few days before the capture of Yorktown, but was not disembarked from its transports for service until after the battle of Williamsburgh; and the field-artillery of McCall's division of McDowell's corpd a degree of proficiency highly creditable. Special detailed reports have been made and transmitted by me of the general artillery operations at the siege of Yorktown, and, by their immediate commanders, of the services of the field-batteries at the battles of Williamsburgh, Hanover Court-House, and those severely contested on
not to be less than four hundred rounds per gun. Seventh. A siege-train of fifty pieces. This was subsequently expanded for special service at the siege of Yorktown to very nearly one hundred pieces, and comprised the unusual calibres, and enormously heavy weight of metal, of two two hundred-pounders, five one hundred-pounde must be added the field-artillery of Franklin's division of McDowell's corps, (four batteries of twenty-two guns,) which joined a few days before the capture of Yorktown, but was not disembarked from its transports for service until after the battle of Williamsburgh; and the field-artillery of McCall's division of McDowell's corpd a degree of proficiency highly creditable. Special detailed reports have been made and transmitted by me of the general artillery operations at the siege of Yorktown, and, by their immediate commanders, of the services of the field-batteries at the battles of Williamsburgh, Hanover Court-House, and those severely contested on
raph had reached the new quarters two hours in advance. When our troops are obliged to remain a few days in one position, wires are immediately run from Gen. McClellan's quarters to the headquarters of all commanders of divisions, thereby placing the entire section of country occupied by our troops under his instant control Assistance like this is surely valuable to our glorious cause, and, I am happy to say, it is fully appreciated by the General. Saturday previous to the evacuation of Yorktown, Gen. McClellan ordered me to run a wire into our Battery No. 6, in order to give him telegraphic communication from his headquarters, which were distant about one and a half miles. This battery laid half a mile in front of General Heintzelman, and within half a mile of a long chain of rebel batteries. The office at Battery No. 6 was to be located under ground, in a bombproof arrangement, in order to save the precious life of the manipulator, who would be in his hole before day break the n
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