hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 70 results in 21 document sections:

1 2 3
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 2, chapter 143 (search)
HecataeusHecataeus died soon after the Persian war. the historian was once at Thebes , where he made a genealogy for himself that had him descended from a god in the sixteenth generation. But the priests of Zeus did with him as they also did with me (who had not traced my own lineage). They brought me into the great inner court of the temple and showed me wooden figures there which they counted to the total they had already given, for every high priest sets up a statue of himself there during his lifetime; pointing to these and counting, the priests showed me that each succeeded his father; they went through the whole line of figures, back to the earliest from that of the man who had most recently died. Thus, when Hecataeus had traced his descent and claimed that his sixteenth forefather was a god, the priests too traced a line of descent according to the method of their counting; for they would not be persuaded by him that a man could be descended from a god; they traced descent thr
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 2, chapter 166 (search)
The Kalasiries are from the districts of Thebes , Bubastis, Aphthis, Tanis, Mendes, Sebennys, Athribis, Pharbaïthis, Thmuis, Onuphis, Anytis, Myecphoris (this last is in an island opposite the city of Bubastis)— from all of these; their number, at its greatest, attained to two hundred and fifty thousand men. These too may practise no trade but war, which is their hereditary calli
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 3, chapter 10 (search)
lmed and laid in the burial-place built for him in the temple. While his son Psammenitus was king of Egypt, the people saw an extraordinary thing, namely, rain at Thebes of Egypt, where, as the Thebans themselves say, there had never been rain before, nor since to my lifetime; for indeed there is no rain at all in the upper partst Thebes of Egypt, where, as the Thebans themselves say, there had never been rain before, nor since to my lifetime; for indeed there is no rain at all in the upper parts of Egypt; but at that time a drizzle of rain fell at Thebes .In modern times there is sometimes a little rain at Thebes (Luxor); very little and very seldom. t Thebes of Egypt, where, as the Thebans themselves say, there had never been rain before, nor since to my lifetime; for indeed there is no rain at all in the upper parts of Egypt; but at that time a drizzle of rain fell at Thebes .In modern times there is sometimes a little rain at Thebes (Luxor); very little and very seldom.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 3, chapter 25 (search)
ring from the Fish-eaters, ordering the Greeks who were with him to await him where they were, and taking with him all his land army. When he came in his march to Thebes , he detached about fifty thousand men from his army, and directed them to enslave the Ammonians and burn the oracle of Zeus; and he himself went on towards Ethioy desert, some did a terrible thing, taking by lot one man out of ten and eating him. Hearing this, Cambyses feared their becoming cannibals, and so gave up his expedition against the Ethiopians and marched back to Thebes , with the loss of many of his army; from Thebes he came down to Memphis, and sent the Greeks to sail away. y desert, some did a terrible thing, taking by lot one man out of ten and eating him. Hearing this, Cambyses feared their becoming cannibals, and so gave up his expedition against the Ethiopians and marched back to Thebes , with the loss of many of his army; from Thebes he came down to Memphis, and sent the Greeks to sail away.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 3, chapter 26 (search)
So fared the expedition against Ethiopia. As for those who were sent to march against the Ammonians, they set out and journeyed from Thebes with guides; and it is known that they came to the city of Oasis,Oasis means simply a planted place; Herodotus makes it a proper name. What he means here is the “Great oasis” of Khargeh, about seven days' journey from Thebes , as he says. inhabited by Samians said to be of the Aeschrionian tribe, seven days' march from Thebes across sandy desert; this place is called, in the Greek language, Islands of the Blest. Thus far, it is said, the army came; after that, except for the Ammonians themselves and those who heard Thebes across sandy desert; this place is called, in the Greek language, Islands of the Blest. Thus far, it is said, the army came; after that, except for the Ammonians themselves and those who heard from them, no man can say anything of them; for they neither reached the Ammonians nor returned back. But this is what the Ammonians themselves say: when the Persians were crossing the sand from Oasis to attack them, and were about midway between their country and Oasis, while they were breakfasting a great and violent south wind
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 4, chapter 181 (search)
nted by wild beasts, and beyond this wild beasts' haunt runs a ridge of sand that stretches from Thebes of Egypt to the Pillars of Heracles.Herodotus' description is true in so far as it points to thom Egypt to northwestern Africa; the starting-point of which, however, should be Memphis and not Thebes . But his distances between identifiable places are nearly always incorrect; the whole descriptit away toward the desert and inland from the wild beasts' country. The first on the journey from Thebes , ten days distant from there, are the Ammonians, who follow the worship of the Zeus of Thebes ;Thebes ; for, as I have said before, the image of Zeus at Thebes has the head of a ram. They have another spring of water besides, which is warm at dawn, and colder at market-time, and very cold at noon; anThebes has the head of a ram. They have another spring of water besides, which is warm at dawn, and colder at market-time, and very cold at noon; and it is then that they water their gardens; as the day declines, the coldness abates, until at sunset the water grows warm. It becomes ever hotter and hotter until midnight, and then it boils and bubb
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 5, chapter 53 (search)
Thus the sum total of stages is one hundred and eleven. So many resting-stages, then, are there in the journey up from Sardis to Susa. If I have accurately counted the parasangs of the royal road, and the parasang is of thirty furlongs' length, which assuredly it is, then between Sardis and the king's abode called MemnonianMemnon was the legendary king of the “eastern Ethiopians,” or Assyrians. When tradition began to place the Homeric Ethiopians in Libya, Memnon, the Ethiop king, came to be associated with Thebes in Egypt. there are thirteen thousand and five hundred furlongs, the number of parasangs being four hundred and fifty. If each day's journey is one hundred and fifty furlongs, then the sum of days spent is ninety, neither more nor les
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book I, section 131 (search)
When Hyrcanus and Antipater were thus deprived of their hopes from the Arabians, they transferred the same to their adversaries; and because Pompey had passed through Syria, and was come to Damascus, they fled to him for assistance; and, without any bribes, they made the same equitable pleas that they had used to Aretas, and besought him to hate the violent behavior of Aristobulus, and to bestow the kingdom on him to whom it justly belonged, both on account of his good character and on account of his superiority in age. However, neither was Aristobulus wanting to himself in this case, as relying on the bribes that Scaurus had received: he was also there himself, and adorned himself after a manner the most agreeable to royalty that he was able. But he soon thought it beneath him to come in such a servile manner, and could not endure to serve his own ends in a way so much more abject than he was used to; so he departed from Diospolis.
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 3, line 509 (search)
tes. Your battaile is with such As are but Meicocks in effect: and yet ye doe so much In conquering them, that by the deede the olde renowne ye save, Which from your fathers by discent this present time ye have. If fatall destnies doe forbid that Thebae long shall stande, Would God that men with Canon shot might raze it out of hande. Would God the noyse of fire and sworde did in our hearing sound. For then in this our wretchednesse there could no fault be found. Then might we justly waile our hese Ceremonies lately now begonne. Hath King Atrisius heart inough this fondling for to hate That makes himselfe to be a God? and for to shut the gate Of Argus at his comming there? and shall this rover make King Penthey and the noble towne of Thebae thus to quake? Go quickly sirs (these wordes he spake unto his servaunts) go And bring the Captaine hither bound with speede. Why stay ye so? His Grandsire Cadmus, Athamas and others of his kinne Reproved him by gentle meanes but nothing coul
s at Thebes, Alabastron, and elsewhere, but especially the former, are found chairs of almost all kinds which modern ingenuity has revived. Thrones, couches, sociables, folding, reclining, lazyback; leather-seated, cane-seated, split-bottom, made of ebony, inlaid with metals and ivory, with carved backs, sides, and legs; with claw-feet and foot-pads, and upholstered with gorgeous coverings resembling the rich stuffs of modern luxury. Egyptian Fauteuils (from the tombs of the Kings), Thebes, Africa, 1500 B. C. Fig. 1235 shows how little in the way of luxury was left to be desired in the chair line. The back consisted of a frame, receding gradually and terminating at its summit in a graceful curve supported from without by perpendicular bars. Over the chair was placed a handsome pillow of colored linen or wool, painted leather, or gold and silver tissue. The upper figure has an elaborately carved frame, the legs of which are formed of crossed swords, to which are tied captive
1 2 3