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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
royed, as an example to others. The war had been carried on by these worthless marauders in such a way that this course was found to be necessary to put a check on operations which had the effect of embittering both parties without in any way benefitting the Confederate cause. On the bodies of some of the guerillas who were killed in one of the attacks was found an oath of allegiance to the United States Government. A certain class of persons would take the oath of allegiance to the United States one day, to secure protection, and the next would be found firing upon unarmed vessels. The command of Lieutenant-Commander Fitch was increased as fast as the small stern-wheel merchant-steamers could be altered into gun-boats, the Navy Department having authorized Admiral Porter to purchase as many of these as he deemed requisite to put down the guerillas and protect loyal citizens, and a large number of naval vessels were soon in commission on the western waters. One requisition al
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
to the lake to ascertain the cause of it. She arrived at the mouth of the Atchafalaya, where she grounded and remained until midnight. Several of the crew of the Diana had escaped, and they informed the commanding officer of the Calhoun that the Diana had been captured near Petersonville. Acting-Master Jordan threw overboard part of his ballast, his coal, provisions, and even ammunition, and finally reached the bay at 2 A. M.; but the Diana was a prize to the enemy. Another of the United States vessels was lost a short time after, the Barrataria, Acting-Ensign Jas. T. Perkins, at the mouth of the Amite River, on Lake Mariposa She was on a reconnaissance with some army officers in Lake Mariposa, intending to examine the mouth of the Amite River. The pilot stated that there was always five feet of water there, but the vessel struck on a sunken snag and stuck fast. Everything possible was being done to relieve the vessel and get her off, when they were attacked by a force of con
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
ms. It is not only in regard to the men who fought the battles of the war that the public should be interested, but they should also be glad to understand the work done by those in official positions at headquarters in overcoming tiresome details, in fighting against ignorance and prejudice, or in providing for the thousand wants of fleets and ships, which, without proper forethought on their part, might have been paralyzed, perhaps in a time of great danger to the nation. When the United States was drawn into the dreadful contest, which brought sorrow and desolation to so many homes, the country was in no condition to go into a war of any kind. Had we become involved at that time with a fifth-rate naval power. we should have been humiliated beyond anything one can conceive; our cities would have been bombarded and laid waste, our commerce would have been driven from the ocean to seek shelter under some neutral flag, and our Navy, instead of being in condition to take the sea
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
ficer, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Lieutenant Napoleon Collins, U. S. N., United States Gun-boat Unadilla, Port Royal harbor. Letter commending the officers of the Curlew by Aclull. At daybreak two vessels were seen on our starboard-bow, one of which proved to be the United States steamer Isaac P. Smith, commanded by Lieutenant J. W. A. Nicholson, of the Navy. She descriope once more cheered the hearts of all on board the transport. Between 2 and 3 o'clock the United States frigate Sabine (Captain Ringgold) was within hail, and the assurance given that all hands wo, Commanding Battalion Marines, Southern Division. Flag-Officer Samuel F. Dupont, Commanding United States Naval Expedition, Southern Coast, U. S. N. America. The capture of Tybee Island, Georgiarbor, Nov. 25, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to inform the Department that the flag of the United States is flying over the territory of the State of Georgia. As soon as the serious injury to th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
crashed into the Federal vessels, with the reply, This is the Confederate States' steam-ram, Palmetto State. The order was given to fire, bgraphic despatch of the 13th instant, from the President of the United States, sent from Fortress Monroe. The Department will probably havtic Blockading Squadron. Lieutenant Napoleon Collins, U. S. N., United States Gun-boat Unadilla, Port Royal harbor. Letter commending thes were seen on our starboard-bow, one of which proved to be the United States steamer Isaac P. Smith, commanded by Lieutenant J. W. A. Nicholrts of all on board the transport. Between 2 and 3 o'clock the United States frigate Sabine (Captain Ringgold) was within hail, and the assus, Southern Division. Flag-Officer Samuel F. Dupont, Commanding United States Naval Expedition, Southern Coast, U. S. N. America. The cap I have the honor to inform the Department that the flag of the United States is flying over the territory of the State of Georgia. As soo
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
r space will not permit it. It is seldom that the sailors, who are so much exposed, have their names handed down in history, and it is a mistake commanders of vessels commit in failing to notice the gallant tars who, in all the wars which the United States has had with foreign nations, have performed acts of heroism that could not be excelled by the bravest officers. Lieutenant Lamson shows a praiseworthy example by commending the deeds of his gallant sailors as well as those of his officershe amenities of war were entirely forgotten on this occasion, and such wantonness could only insure retaliation on the first favorable opportunity. On the morning of June 4th, an expedition of 400 soldiers embarked at Yorktown on board the United States steamers Commodore Morris (Lieutenant-Commander Gillis), Commodore Jones (Lieutenant-Commander Mitchell), the army gun-boat Smith Briggs and the transport Winnissimmet. These vessels proceeded to Walkertown, about twenty miles above West
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
om Battery Gregg less than one mile, and by these two works it might be said to be covered. It was very plain to a mere tyro in engineering that Wagner was the key to the destruction of Sumter and the acquisition of the enemy's works on Sullivan's Island. A new era had dawned in engineering, and the clever enemy, with sand-bags and timber, had built a work far excelling anything in the shape of mortar, brick and stone, and had armed it with the heaviest guns at that time known in the United States. This was the fort (Wagner) which so far had defied the forces of both the Army and the Navy. It now became necessary to prosecute the siege of Wagner with patience and perseverance, as it was felt that the number of Union troops was inadequate to carry the work without throwing away the lives of the men and the useless expenditure of materials, therefore active operations were for the moment suspended. It was very evident that the fire of the naval vessels could silence Wagner's
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 37: operations of the East Gulf Squadron to October, 1863. (search)
at section of the country, the years spent in hunting the Indian in dismal swamps and forest fastnesses, had produced a class of people far more barbarous than the Indians themselves — men without any sentiment but a love of plunder, who placed no more value on human life than on the life of a dog. Yet they were intrepid and defied all laws, human and divine, and the only way to touch their understanding was by the most severe retaliation. On Friday, March 20th, an expedition left the United States bark Amanda, for the purpose of proceeding to the Ocklockonnee River, to cut out the schooner Forward, supposed to be loaded with cotton. The expedition was under the charge of Acting-Master R. J. Hoffner, and consisted of two boats and twenty-seven men, with a boat howitzer. Great difficulty was encountered in finding the mouth of the river, and the boats constantly grounded on oyster beds, over which they had to be hauled in the night for fear of discovery, but at daylight the entr
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
nd, for the first time in its history, the United States had a Navy commensurate with its importancd which operated very unjustly against the United States. The Government was obliged to acquiesce afloat, it excluded the naval ships of the United States from the principal ports of the world. Ascan commerce and then find protection from United States vessels-of-war within the jurisdiction of t were professedly in close amity with the United States. The Sumter, the very first Confederateates and hostile to the war-vessels of the United States; and, while giving aid and comfort to thosrmation of the intended movements of every United States vessel-of-war in those waters. Worse thanate, in regard to the lawful operations of United States vessels. It can easily be imagined, und as these, how difficult it would be for a United States vessel-of-war to capture one of these sea-assumed an intimacy with the commanders of United States vessels, and deceived them with false repo[2 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
itary movements in the coming campaign. The commissioners appointed for this purpose were Messrs. Thompson, of Mississippi, Holcombe, of Virginia, and Clay, of Alabama, who were to proceed to a convenient spot on the northern frontier of the United States, and to use whatever political opportunities the military events of the war might disclose. The commissioners succeeded in running the blockade from Wilmington, and reached Canada, only to find that the Northern sentiment in regard to the Contly increasing, and, in place of the raw volunteers of 1861, who could hardly handle a musket, the Union could boast of nearly a million of veteran soldiers. Grant was now called East to command, as Lieutenant-General, all the armies of the United States; while his most able coadjutor, General Sherman, with an army of veterans famous on many a field, was to commence his march through the South, and join Grant before the defences of Richmond. The military history of the year 1864 will show
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