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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Federal Atrocities in the Civil war. From the New Orleans, La., Picayune, August 10, 1902. (search)
that humanity must have marched backward for eighteen centuries. Mr. Sibley must have read American history to very little purpose if he wound go back more than a half century to find prototypes of General Smith wearing the uniform of the United States and issuing orders to kill noncombatants and burn their homes. Nor were they criticised in Congress nor court-martialed for those acts of violence. But the victims in these cases were only white citizens of the southern part of the UnitedUnited States, and not brown-skinned Filipinos. It is not for the purpose of reopening old sores, now happily healed, but to show that General Jacob H. Smith is not the only modern Duke of Alva, that these facts are recited. General Smith had an illustrious example. General W. T. Sherman said: War is hell; and General Sherman knew, for he certainly endeavored to make it so. On October 29, 1864, General Sherman issued the following official order, viz.: headquarters Military Division of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.65 (search)
mercenaries from all parts of the world was constantly flowing, and to secure something like equal treatment to the Confederate States, especially as regarded their navy. French commercial interests, I well knew; made the mercantile world lean towarch I read, to be presented to Napoleon III, quoting the third article of the treaty of Paris, ceding Louisiana to the United States, etc., etc. There was no other paper prepared than Governor Allen's letter, and since the correspondent of the Wasfleets at New York and San Francisco—with orders, as afterward transpired, to place themselves at the disposal of the United States Government—cut at least some figure in Lord Palmerston's philosophy. So much for history! The wonderful array of e time west of the Mississippi River that the Confederacy was doomed, and the effort was to preserve the part of the United States west of the river to the PacificOcean as a slaveholding Confederacy. Of course, if the European nations adopted the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hanover Grays. (search)
Hanover Grays. A Roll of this gallant Organization—a long death list. The following is the roll of Company I, 15th Virginia Volunteers Infantry (Hanover Grays), Corse's Brigade, Pickett's Division, Longstreet's Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. This company was organized at Old Church, Hanover County, Va., in December of 1859, and mustered into the service of the Confederate States at Richmond, Va., April 23, 1861, and continued in service until the surrender at Appomattox Courthouse, in April, 1865. Captain, B. W. Talley, served from April 23, 1861, to April, 1862; now dead. First Lieutenant, Thaddeus Foster, served from April 23, 1861, to April, 1862; now dead. Second Lieutenant, William Boyd, served from April 23, 1861, to April, 1862; now dead. Captain James D. Waid, served from April 23, 1862, to 1865. First Lieutenant, George P. Haw, served from April 23, 1862, to 1865; lost an arm. Second Lieutenant, John W. Davidson, served from April 23, 1862, to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), In Memoriam. (search)
e of the Southern Historical Society, it has lost by death two of its highly valued members, who not only in signal service in the field, in the Army of the Confederate States, but in enkindling reverence for the just cause since, have commended themselves by their example, not alone to us, but world-wide to those who hold truth and fidelity in regard. Richard Launcelot Maury, Colonel Confederate States Army, born in Fredericksburg, Va., in 1842; died at Richmond, Va., October 14, 1907; son of Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury, the Pathfinder of the Seas, and by double line of that fugitive Huguenot band of exiles for conscience sake, whose influence is th the rank of colonel. Since the war he has been a successful practitioner of law at Richmond, Va. Wilfred E. Cutshaw, Lieutenant-Colonel of Artillery Confederate States Army; born at Harper's Ferry, W. Va., January 25, 1838; died at Richmond, Va., December 19, 1907; of sturdy Scotch and steadfast English blood—his mother be
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
125 Christian M D., Col. W. B., 62 Cold Harbor, Battle of, 191 Confederate Memorial Literary Society, 258 Confederate States Cotton bonds: Failure to sell in 1862, 201 Fictitious Value of in 1869, 203 Confederate States Naval Steamers 23Confederate States Naval Steamers 239 242 Confederate States Navy Surviving Officers of, 290 Confederates Buried at Vicksburg, 53 Conway Dr. W. B 160 Cutshaw, Col. W. E., Tribute to 372 De Leon, T. C., 167 Dickens, Capt. J. N. L., 284 Dinkins, Captain James 60,109 DConfederate States Navy Surviving Officers of, 290 Confederates Buried at Vicksburg, 53 Conway Dr. W. B 160 Cutshaw, Col. W. E., Tribute to 372 De Leon, T. C., 167 Dickens, Capt. J. N. L., 284 Dinkins, Captain James 60,109 Dranesville, Federal Victory at in 1861, 69 Duke, Gen. Basil W., 160 Egerton Capt. W. B. 21 Ellsworth, G. A., Telegraph Operator, 118 Ewing D. D., Rev. Daniel B., 85 F Company, Richmond, Va., 59, 372 Farragut, How mosquitos prevente. G, 24th Regiment 352 Roll of Co. 115th Regiment 363 Roll of Co. A, 49th Regiment, 298 Vicksburg, Siege of, 47; Confederate States dead in Cemetery at, 53 Walker, Gen James A., 83 Walker Major John Stewart 123 Wallace Gen. H. H L.. 310
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