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Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 40 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 38 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 36 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 32 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 32 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Suppliant Women (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 28 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 22 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 20 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 14 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. You can also browse the collection for Egypt (Egypt) or search for Egypt (Egypt) in all documents.

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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of the English Ambassadour to M. Harvie Millers, appointing him Consull for the English nation in Alex andria, Cairo , and other places of Egypt . (search)
A letter of the English Ambassadour to M. Harvie Millers, appointing him Consull for the English nation in Alex andria, Cairo , and other places of Egypt . HAVING to appoint our Consull in Cayro, Alexandria, Egypt , and other parts adjacent, for the safe protection of body and goods of her Majesties subjects; being well perswaded of your sufficient abilitie; in her Majesties name I doe elect and make choise of you, good friend Harvie Millers, to execute the same worshipfull office, as shall beEgypt , and other parts adjacent, for the safe protection of body and goods of her Majesties subjects; being well perswaded of your sufficient abilitie; in her Majesties name I doe elect and make choise of you, good friend Harvie Millers, to execute the same worshipfull office, as shall be required for her Majesties better service, the commodity of her subjects, and my contentation : having and injoying for merit of your travell in the premisses the like remuneration incident to the rest of ours in such office in other parts of this Empire. Requiring you (all other affaires set aside) to repaire thither with expedition, and attend upon this your charge, which the Almighty grant you well to accomplish. For the due execution whereof, we heerewith send you the Grand Signiors Patent
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Notes concerning the trade in Alexandria. (search)
Notes concerning the trade in Alexandria. ALEXANDRIA in Egypt is a free port, and when a man commeth within the castles, presently the Ermyn sends aboord to have one come and speake with him, to know what goods are aboord: and then hee will set guards aboord the ship to see all the goods discharged. And then from the Ermin you goe to the Bye, onely for that he will inquire newes of you, and so from thence to the Consuls house where you lie. The Venetians have a Consul themselves. But all other nations goe to the French nations Consul, who will give you a chamber for your selves apart, if you will so have it. The customs inward of all commodities are ten in the hundred, & the custome is paid in wares also that you buy: for the same wares in barter you pay also ten in the hundred, at the lading of the wares. But if you sell for mony, you pay no more custome but the ten aforesaid, and one and a half in the hundred, which is for the custome of the goods you lade for th
A commaundement for Egypt . SCITO quod orator Reginae Angliae in porta mea existens libellum supplicem ad portam nostram mittens significavit, quod cum ex Ægypto Consul eorum abesset, Consul illie Gallicus existens, Vento nuncupatus, quamvis ante haec tempora ne manus in Anglos mitteret mandatum nostrum fuerit datum, Angli sub vexillo & tutela nostra sunt inquiens, mandatum Caesareum vili existimans, non cessavit perturbare Anglos. Quare scito quod Reginae Angliae privilegium nostrum est datum. Juxta illud privilegium Anglis nulla ratione Consul Gallicus Consulatum agat, neve manus immittat, mandatum nostrum postulavit ejus legatus. Quare mando, ut contra privilegium nostrum Consul Gallicus Anglis injuriam non inferat, neve Consulatum agat. Judici Ægypti literae nostrae sunt date : hanc ob causam mando tibi quoque, ut juxta illud mandatum nostrum, contra privilegium nostrum Anglis Gallum Consulatum agere nunquam patiare. Sic scito, & insigni meo fidem adhi
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A description of the yeerely voyage or pilgrimage of the Mahumitans, Turkes and Moores unto Mecca in Arabia . (search)
dore her, reverence her, and finally have canonized her for a Saint, affirming that shee did many miracles. The third is called Zavia della Innachari, who was one of the foure Doctors in the law. The fourth is called Imamsciafii, where is buried Sciafii the second Doctor of this law. Of the other two Doctors one is buried in Damasco , the other in Aleppo. The fift & last famous monument is Giamalazar, that is, the house of Lazarus: and this is the generall University of the whole kingdome of Egypt . In this place Anno 1566 in the moneth of January by misfortune of fire were burned nine thousand bookes of great value, as well for that they were written by hand, as also wrought so richly with golde, that they were worth 300 and 400 ducats a piece, one with another. And because it could never be knowen yet how this fire beganne, they have and doe holde the same for a most sinister augurie, and an. evident and manifest signe of their utter ruine. The houses of Cairo without are very faire
dore her, reverence her, and finally have canonized her for a Saint, affirming that shee did many miracles. The third is called Zavia della Innachari, who was one of the foure Doctors in the law. The fourth is called Imamsciafii, where is buried Sciafii the second Doctor of this law. Of the other two Doctors one is buried in Damasco , the other in Aleppo. The fift & last famous monument is Giamalazar, that is, the house of Lazarus: and this is the generall University of the whole kingdome of Egypt . In this place Anno 1566 in the moneth of January by misfortune of fire were burned nine thousand bookes of great value, as well for that they were written by hand, as also wrought so richly with golde, that they were worth 300 and 400 ducats a piece, one with another. And because it could never be knowen yet how this fire beganne, they have and doe holde the same for a most sinister augurie, and an. evident and manifest signe of their utter ruine. The houses of Cairo without are very faire
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voiage made out of England unto Guinea and Benin in Affrike, at the charges of certaine marchants Adventurers of the Citie of London, in the yeere of our Lord 1553. (search)
Cape de Bona Speranza: and on the other side with the sea of sand, called Mare de Sabione, a very dangerous sea lying between ye great citie of Alcair, or Cairo in Aegypt, and the country of Aethiopia: In the which way are many unhabitable deserts, continuing for the space of five dayes journey. And they affirme, that if the sayd Christian Emperor were not hindered by those deserts (in the which is great lacke of victuals, & especially of water) he would or now have invaded the kingdom of Egypt , and the citie of Alcair. The chiefe city of Ethiopia , where this great emperor is resident, is called Amacaiz, being a faire citie, whose inhabitants are of the colour of an Olive. There are also many other cities, as the city of Sava upon the river of Nilus, where the Emperour is accustomed to remaine in the Sommer season. There is likewise a great city named Barbaregaf, and Ascon, from whence it is said that the Queene of Saba came to Hierusalem to heare the wisedom of Salomon. This cit
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The English Voyages, Navigations, and Discoveries (intended for the finding of a North-west passage) to the North parts of America, to Meta incognita, and the backeside of Gronland , as farre as 72 degrees and 12 minuts: performed first by Sebastian Cabota, and since by Sir Martin Frobisher, and M. John Davis, with the Patents, Discourses, and Advertisements thereto belonging. (search)
t Cheinies: Let the way be voyde of all difficulties, yet doeth it not follow that wee have free passage to Cathayo. For examples sake: You may trend all Norway , Finmarke, and Lappeland, and then bowe Southward to Saint Nicholas in Moscovia: you may likewise in the Mediterranean Sea fetch Constantinople, and the mouth of Tanais : yet is there no passage by Sea through Moscovia into Pont Euxine, now called Mare Maggiore. Againe, in the aforesaid Mediterranean sea, we saile to Alexandria in Egypt , the Barbarians bring their pearle and spices from the Moluccaes up the Red sea or Arabian gulph to Sues, scarcely three dayes journey from the aforesayd haven: yet have wee no way by sea from Alexandria to the Moluccaes, for that Isthmos or litle straight of land betweene the two seas. In like maner although the Northerne passage be free at 61 degrees of latitude, and the West Ocean beyond America , usually called Mar del Zur, knowen to be open at 40. degrees elevation from the Island Jap
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine other reasons, or arguments to proove a passage by the Northwest, learnedly written by M. Richard Willes Gentleman. (search)
t Cheinies: Let the way be voyde of all difficulties, yet doeth it not follow that wee have free passage to Cathayo. For examples sake: You may trend all Norway , Finmarke, and Lappeland, and then bowe Southward to Saint Nicholas in Moscovia: you may likewise in the Mediterranean Sea fetch Constantinople, and the mouth of Tanais : yet is there no passage by Sea through Moscovia into Pont Euxine, now called Mare Maggiore. Againe, in the aforesaid Mediterranean sea, we saile to Alexandria in Egypt , the Barbarians bring their pearle and spices from the Moluccaes up the Red sea or Arabian gulph to Sues, scarcely three dayes journey from the aforesayd haven: yet have wee no way by sea from Alexandria to the Moluccaes, for that Isthmos or litle straight of land betweene the two seas. In like maner although the Northerne passage be free at 61 degrees of latitude, and the West Ocean beyond America , usually called Mar del Zur, knowen to be open at 40. degrees elevation from the Island Jap
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