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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 13 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 19 1 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 18 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 18 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 17 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Gideon Welles or search for Gideon Welles in all documents.

Your search returned 191 results in 34 document sections:

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
Mitchell, and others. official letters of Gideon Welles, Mayor Monroe, and the city council of Newficer, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. Cficer, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. Cficer, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. Cficer, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. Cr obedient servant, T. Bailey, Captain. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington. ficer, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C, David D. Porter, Commanding Flotilla. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. List of Confe, David D. Porter, Commanding Flotilla. Hon. Gideon Welles. Secretary of the Navy. Letter of Congratulations. I am, respectfully, &c., Gideon Welles. Commander David D. Porter, Commanding Uni[6 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
re had passed away while the Senators were listening to Bailey's account, during which time Secretary Welles was employed in reading Farragut's report. It was not a long one, but did not clearly menttle to the Secretary of the Navy, instead of the one which was last issued to the fleet. Secretary Welles and those about him at once detected the difference between Farragut's report and Bailey's he forts, nevertheless he related it all in the simplest and most unpretending language. Secretary Welles, on reading Farragut's report, lost no time in writing a note to Senator Grimes, and sendinjust taken the floor, and was eulogizing the brilliant victory that had been reported, when Secretary Welles' note was put into his hand. He was taken all aback on reading it, and after finishing itsmiral on the list. Senator Grimes, in the kindness of his heart, went to him and showed him Mr. Welles' letter, and told him that he had better go to the Department at once and set the matter right
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
Farragut, Commanding Western Gulf Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. obd't serv't. D. G. Farragut, Flag-officer. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of Navy, Washington. United Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. United States Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. W. D. Porter, Commodore, United States Navy. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 26: siege of Vicksburg. (search)
re the surrender. In conclusion, I would state that the 9-inch guns of the Indianola were thrown overboard, and the 11-inch guns damaged by being loaded with heavy charges and solid shot, placed muzzle to muzzle and fired by a slow match, so that they were rendered useless. This was done in consequence of the sham monitor, sent from above, having grounded about two miles above the wreck of the Indianola. I have the honor to be, etc., George Brown, Lieut.-Commander U. S. Navy. Hon. Gideon Welles. Secretary of the Navy. Other means had now to be invented to get into the rear of the enemy or down the river in order to stop his supplies. The importance of this late move cannot be estimated. The communications between Texas and Vicksburg had been cut off, and the capture of so many steamers loaded with army stores for Port Hudson had sealed the fate of that place; they could not hold out, and Bank's Army would soon be free to march upon Vicksburg by the left shore of the r
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 29: siege of Vicksburg--continued. (search)
of Vicksburg. true history. harmony in Army and Navy co-operation. last words of Grant. detailed report of Rear-Admiral Porter. congratulatory letter of Secretary Welles. As the Army had marched from Bruensburg, and was well on the way to Vicksburg, Admiral Porter changed his station from Grand Gulf to the flag-ship Black s of surveyors. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Acting Rear-Admiral, Commanding Mississippi Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Congratulatory letter to Rear--Admiral Porter on the surrender of Vicksburg. Navy Department, July 13, 1nths of trial and hardship, and so daring under all circumstances, I tender, in the name of the President, the thanks and congratulations of the whole country, on the fall of Vicksburg. Very respectfully, etc., Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding Mississippi Squadron, Vicksburg, Miss.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
e battle to his (Lieutenant-Commander Prichett's) full knowledge of the situation and his skill in adapting the means within his command to the end to be attained. . . . . . . . . Permit me to add, sir, that I can conceive of no case wherein promotions would be more worthily bestowed than in that of Lieutenant-Commander Prichett, and it will give me great pleasure to learn that his services have received a proper reward. Prichett never received any reward save an eloquent letter from Mr. Secretary Welles, which that gentleman knew so well how to indite, but he had the satisfaction of not having dimmed the lustre of that 4th of July made so glorious by the capture of Vicksburg and the victory of Gettysburg. On the 9th of August the Mound City, Lieutenant-Commander Byron Wilson, while at Lake Providence, gave the enemy a severe lesson. Captain John McNeil, C. S. A., notorious raider, made a descent on Lake Providence with some seventy men, for the purpose of carrying off some mules,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
nected with the Navy Department to assist Secretary Welles. Paulding drives the secessionists out oto the rule. The Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Gideon Welles, was not a naval man in any sense of then-clads. It was absolutely necessary that Mr. Welles should have an adviser in his department whoetary of the Navy.until none but a person of Mr. Welles' placid temper or Mr. Fox's inflexible will nfluenced by such a procrastinating policy. Mr. Welles while Secretary of the Navy received his shantion to the civil branch of the Department, Mr. Welles was presiding over all and giving to each hihese documents will convince any one that Secretary Welles had abilities of no ordinary kind, and thg of the Navy Department, we shall regard Secretary Welles as the responsible head to whom all undery turrets large enough for 15-inch guns; and Mr. Welles, on hearing his story, agreed with him in hire, but owing to the wording of the law Mr. Secretary Welles did not feel himself authorized to reco[15 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
Lincoln and Admiral Dupont, and between Mr. Secretary Welles and Admiral Dupont. Admiral Dupont retd is succeeded by Rear-Admiral Dahlgren. Secretary Welles' letter to Rear-Admiral Dupont on his givrence to all others. In this matter, Mr. Secretary Welles and Mr. Fox showed good judgment, for tthere was of meeting its expectations: Secretary Welles to Rear-Admiral Dupont. Navy Departr-Admiral, Commanding S. A. B. Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington. ement from the command of the squadron, Mr. Secretary Welles wrote the Admiral the following letter,ding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. Cding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington. Ryour command. I am, respectfully, etc., Gideon Welles. Flag-Officer Samuel F. Dupont, Commandingding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington. [5 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
F. Dupont, Flag-Officer, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. P. S.--Bearer of dispatc F. Dupont, Flag-Officer, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington. Report of Lieutenant-Commander C. er, you will cause to be read to your command. I am, respectfully, etc., Gideon Welles. Flag-Officer Samuel F. Dupont, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadrfrom each Navy Yard at meridian on the day after the receipt of this order. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Flag-officer Dupont's report concerning the Mar F. Dupont, Flag-Officer, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington. Report of Major John Geo. Reynold F. Dupont, Flag-Officer, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Note.-The reports of the other commanding of
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
der enemy's guns. capture of Confederate artillery. commendation of Lamson and Cushing by Secretary Welles. capture and destruction of blockade-runners. operations in sounds of North Carolina. Cogallantry and execution and ability, scarcely surpassed by those of more age and experience. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Cushing also came in for a share of commendation for his success on the Nansemond, and Secretary Welles was no less enthusiastic in his praise than in the case of Lieutenant Lamson: Navy Department, May 4. 1863. Sir — Your gallantry and meritorious servicAccept my congratulations for yourself and the officers and men who were under your command. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Lieutenant W. B. Cushing, Commanding Steamer Commodore Barney. Tdds, and for his good conduct during the siege. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Graves and Acting-Master Welles were commended for faithful and efficient service, and were promoted in consequence. A
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