Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1767 AD or search for 1767 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), California (search)
, transported, or acquitted. The tribunal became a terror to evil-doers. Late in 1856 the vigilance committee in San Francisco surrendered its powers to the regularly constituted civil authority. California did not furnish any troops during the Civil War, owing to its isolated position. The Central Pacific Railroad was completed May 12, 1869, thus connecting California with the Mississippi Valley and the Atlantic seaboard. Since then the progress of the State has been phenomenal. From 1767 up to 1821, California being under Spanish rule, ten governors were appointed by that power. From 1822 until 1845, being under Mexican domination, her governors (twelve) were appointed from Mexico. From 1846 her governors have been as follows: California republic Governor. Name.Term. John C. Fremont 1846 Provisional or military governors under the United States. Name.Term. Corn. Robert F. Stockton1847 John C. Fremont1847 Gen. Stephen W. Kearny1847 Richard B. Mason1847 to 1849
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carleton, Sir Guy, Lord Dorchester 1724- (search)
and military officer; born in Stra- Guy Carleton. bane, Ireland, Sept. 3, 1724; entered the Guards at an early age, and became a lieutenant-colonel in 1748. He was aide to the Duke of Cumberland in the German campaign of 1757; was with Amherst in the siege of Louisburg in 1758; with Wolfe at Quebec (1759) as quartermaster-general; and was a brigadier-general at the siege of Belle Isle, where he was wounded. He was also quartermaster-general in the expedition against Havana in 1762, and in 1767 he was made lieutenant-governor of Quebec. The next year he was appointed governor. In 1772 he was promoted to major-general, and in 1774 was made governor-general of the Province of Quebec. In an expedition against the forts on Lake Champlain in 1775 he narrowly escaped capture; and at the close of the year he successfully resisted a siege of Quebec by Montgomery. The next spring and summer he drove the Americans out of Canada, and totally defeated the American flotilla in an engagement
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Columbia University, (search)
, and twenty private gentlemen. The college opened July 17, 1754, with a class of eight, under Dr. Johnson, sole instructor in the vestry-room of Trinity Church. The corner-stone of the college building was laid Aug. 23, 1756, on the block now bounded by Murray, Church, and Barclay streets and College Place. It faced the Hudson River and was the most beautifully situated of any college in the world. The first commencement was on June 21, 1758, when about twenty students were graduated. In 1767 a grant was made in the New Hampshire Grants of 24,000 acres of land, but it was lost by the separation of that part of Vermont from New York. In 1762 Rev. Myles Cooper was sent over by the Archbishop of Canterbury to become a fellow of the college. He was a strong loyalist, and had a pamphlet controversy with young Alexander Hamilton, one of his pupils. Cooper became president of the college, and so obnoxious were his politics that the college was attacked by the Sons of liberty and a mob
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cowdery, Jonathan 1767-1852 (search)
Cowdery, Jonathan 1767-1852 Surgeon; born in Sandisfield, Mass., April 22, 1767; appointed an assistant surgeon in the navy, Jan. 1, 1800; was on the frigate Philadelphia, which was stranded on the coast of Tripoli, Oct. 31, 1803; and held a prisoner by the Turks for nearly two years. After his return to the United States he published a history of his imprisonment. He died in Norfolk, Va., Nov. 20, 1852.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cutler, Ephraim 1767-1853 (search)
Cutler, Ephraim 1767-1853 Surveyor; born in Edgarton. Mass., in 1767; appointed agent of the Ohio Company in 1788; removed to Ohio in 1794; appointed judge of Common Pleas in 1795. He was the author of History of the first settlement of Amestown, Ohio, etc. He died in Amestown, O., in 1853. Cutler, Ephraim 1767-1853 Surveyor; born in Edgarton. Mass., in 1767; appointed agent of the Ohio Company in 1788; removed to Ohio in 1794; appointed judge of Common Pleas in 1795. He was the author of History of the first settlement of Amestown, Ohio, etc. He died in Amestown, O., in 1853.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dana, Francis, 1743-1811 (search)
Dana, Francis, 1743-1811 Jurist; born in Charlestown, Mass., June 13, 1743; son of Richard Dana; graduated at Harvard in 1762. He was admitted to the bar in 1767; was an active patriot; a delegate to the Provincial Congress in 1774; went to England in 1775 with confidential letters to Franklin; was a member of the executive council from 1776 to 1780; member of the Continental Congress from 1776 to 1778, and again in 1784; member of the board of war, Nov. 17, 1777; and was at the head of a committee charged with the entire reorganization of the army. When Mr. Adams went on an embassy to negotiate a treaty of peace and commerce with Great Britain, Mr. Dana was secretary of the legation. At Paris, early in 1781, he received the appointment from Congress of minister to Russia, clothed with power to make the accession of the United States to the armed neutrality. He resided two years at St. Petersburg, and returned to Berlin in 1783. He was again in Congress in the spring of 178
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dickinson, John, 1732-1808 (search)
aw in Philadelphia and at the Temple in London, and practised his profession in Philadelphia. In the Pennsylvania Assembly, to which he was elected in 1764, he showed great legislative ability, and was a ready and vehement debater. At the same time, he wrote much on the subject of British infringement on the liberties of the colonies. The most noted of these writings were papers (twelve in number) entitled Letters from a Pennsylvania farmer, etc., published in the Pennsylvania chronicle in 1767. Mr. Dickinson was a member of the first Continental Congress, and wrote several of the state papers put forth by that body. Considering the resolution of independence unwise, he voted against it and the Declaration, and did not sign the latter document. This made him unpopular. In 1777 he was made a brigadier-general of the Pennsylvania militia. He was elected a representative in Congress from Delaware in 1779, and wrote the Address to the States put forth by that body in May of that ye
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Duer, William, 1747-1799 (search)
Duer, William, 1747-1799 Statesman; born in Devonshire, England, March 18, 1747; in 1767 was aide to Lord Clive in India; came to America, and in 1768 purchased a tract of land in Washington county, N. Y.; became colonel of the militia, judge of the county court, member of the New York Provincial Congress, and of the committee of safety. He was one of the committee that drafted the first constitution of the State of New York (1777), and was a delegate in Congress in 1777-78; and he was secretary of the Treasury Board until the reorganization of the finance department under the national Constitution. He was assistant Secretary of the Treasury under Hamilton until 1790. Colonel Duer married (1779) Catharine, daughter of Lord Stirling. He died in New York City, May 7, 1799.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gardner, Charles K. 1787-1869 (search)
Gardner, Charles K. 1787-1869 Military officer; born in Morris county, N. J., in 1787; joined the army in May, 1808; served in the War of 1812, being present at the actions of Chrysler's Field, Chippewa, Niagara, and Fort Erie; was in the Treasury Department in 1850-67. His publications include A dictionary of commissioned officers who have served in the army of the United States from 1789 to 1853; A compendium of military tactics; and A permanent designation of companies, and Company books, by the first letters of the alphabet. He died in Washington, D. C., Nov. 1, 1869.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Granger, Gideon 1767-1822 (search)
Granger, Gideon 1767-1822 Statesman; born in Suffield, Conn., July 19, 1767; graduated at Yale College in 1787; became a lawyer; Postmaster-General in 1801-14. His publications include a Fourth of July oration, and Political essays. He died in Canandaigua, N. Y., Dec. 31, 1822.
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