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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 6 6 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 5 5 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. 4 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 3 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. 3 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1794 AD or search for 1794 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 156 results in 137 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Belknap, Jeremy, 1744- (search)
Belknap, Jeremy, 1744- Clergyman; born in Boston, June 4, 1744; was graduated at Harvard College in 1762; studied theology; taught school four years; was pastor of a church in Dover. N. H., from 1767 to 1786, and of the Federal Street Church, in Boston, from April 4, 1787, until his death. June 20, 1798. He founded the Massachusetts Historical Society; was an overseer of Harvard College; was a patriot during the war for independence, an opponent of African slavery, and a promoter of literature and science. He published a History of New Hampshire, 3 volumes (1784-92); a collection of Psalms and hymns (1795); The Foresters, a work of wit and humor (1792); American biography, 2 volumes (1794-98), besides sermons and other religious-writings.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Benson, Egbert, 1746-1833 (search)
Benson, Egbert, 1746-1833 Jurist; born in New York City, June 21, 1746; was graduated at King's College (now Columbia University) in 1765; took an active part in political events preliminary to the war for independence; was a member of the Committee of Safety, and, in 1777, was appointed the first attorney-general of the State of New York. He was also a member of the first State legislature. He was a member of the Continental Congress from 1784 to 1789, and of the new Congress from 1789 to 1793, also from 1813 to 1815. From 1789 to 1802, he was a regent of the New York University, judge of the Supreme Court of New York (1794-1801), and of the United States Circuit Court. He was the first president of the New York Historical Society. Judge Benson was the author of a Vindication of the captors of Major Andre;, and a Memoir on Dutch names of places. He died in Jamaica, Long Island, Aug. 24, 1833.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brackenridge, Hugh Henry, 1748-1816 (search)
Brackenridge, Hugh Henry, 1748-1816 Jurist; born in Scotland in 1748; was graduated at Princeton in 1771, in the same class with James Madison. He and Philip Freneau together wrote The rising glory of America, a dialogue which formed a part of the graduating exercises. During the Whiskey Insurrection in 1794 he used all his influence to bring about a settlement between the government and the rebels. He also wrote Incidents of the insurrection in Western Pennsylvania in defence of his action. He died in Carlisle, Pa., June 25, 1816.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brant, John, 1794- (search)
Brant, John, 1794- Indian chief; son of Joseph Brant; born in the Mohawk village on the Grand River, in Canada, Sept. 27, 1794; took up arms for the British when the War of 1812-15 broke out. and led a party of Indians at the battle of Queenston (q. v.). He was then only eighteen years of age, and was conspicuous for his bravery. He had received a good English education at Ancaster and Niagara, and was a diligent student of English authors. Young Brant was an ardent lover of nature. was manly and amiable, and was in every respect an accomplished gentleman. On the death of his father, he became the principal chief of the Six Nations, although he was the fourth and youngest son. Brant was engaged in most of the military events on the Niagara frontier during the war; and at its close he and his young sister Elizabeth occupied John Brant. the homestead at the head of Lake Ontario, and there dispensed a generous hospitality. He went to England in 1821 on business for the Six Na
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bryant, William Cullen, 1794-1878 (search)
Bryant, William Cullen, 1794-1878 Poet; born in Cummington, Mass., Nov. 3, 1794. He communicated rhymes to the county newspaper before he was ten years of age. His father was a distinguished physician and man of letters, and took great pains in the instruction of his son. His poem on The embargo, written at the age of thirteen, evinced great precocity of intellect. Young Bryant called the embargo act a terrapin policy --the policy designed by it of shutting up the nation in its own shell, as it were, like the terrapin with its head. In that poem he violently assailed President Jefferson. and revealed the intensity of the opposition to him and his policy in New England, which made even boys bitter politicians. Alluding to Jefferson's narrow escape from capture by Tarleton in 1781, his zeal for the French, and his scientific researches, young Bryant wrote: And thou, the scorn of every patriot name, Thy country's ruin, and her council's shame! Poor, servile thing! derision
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Butler, John, 1776-1794 (search)
Butler, John, 1776-1794 Tory leader; born in Connecticut; was in official communication with the Johnsons in the Mohawk Valley before the Revolutionary War, and was colonel of a militia regiment in Tryon county, N. Y. In 1776 he organized a band of motley marauders — white men and Indians, the former painted and behaving like savages. He was in command of them in the battle of Oriskany (q. v.), and of 1.100 men who desolated the Wyoming Valley in July, 1778. He fought Sullivan in the Indiand of them in the battle of Oriskany (q. v.), and of 1.100 men who desolated the Wyoming Valley in July, 1778. He fought Sullivan in the Indian country in central New York, in 1779, and accompanied Sir John Johnson in his raid on the Schoharie and Mohawk settlements in 1780. After the war, Butler went to Canada, and was rewarded by the British government with places of emolument and a pension. He died in Niagara in 1794. His son, Walter, was a ferocious Tory. and was killed during the wa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Callender, James Thompson 1792-1813 (search)
Callender, James Thompson 1792-1813 Editor and author; born in Scotland. He published in Edinburgh, in 1792, a book called Political progress of Great Britain, which so offended the authorities that he was banished from the kingdom, and went to Philadelphia, where he published the Political register in 1794-95, and the American annual register for 1796-97. He was a violent and unscrupulous opponent of Washington's administration, and delighted in abusing Hamilton and other Federalist leaders. For a season he enjoyed the friendship of Jefferson. The latter became disgusted with Callender, when the former, becoming Jefferson's enemy, calumniated him fearfully. He published the Richmond Recorder, in which he made fierce attacks upon the character of Washington and Adams. He died in Richmond, Va., in July, 1813.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Child, David Lee 1794-1874 (search)
Child, David Lee 1794-1874 Abolitionist; born in West Boylston, Mass., July 8, 1794; graduated at Harvard College in 1817: was later admitted to the bar. In 1830 he was editor of the Massachusetts journal, and while holding a seat in the legislature opposed the annexation of Texas; afterwards he issued a tract on the subject entitled Naboth's Vineyard. In 1836 he published ten articles on the subject of slavery, and in the following year, while in Paris, addressed a memoir to the Societepour l'abolition d'esclavage. He also forwarded a pamphlet on the same subject to the Eclectic review in London. In 1843-44 he edited (with his wife) the Anti-slavery standard in New York. He died in Wayland, Mass., Sept. 18, 1874.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clarke, Elijah 1774-1799 (search)
Clarke, Elijah 1774-1799 Military officer; born in North Carolina; went to Georgia in 1774, where he became a captain in 1776, and fought both British and Indians on the frontiers. He was an active leader in the war for independence, and was largely instrumental in the capture of Augusta, Ga., in 1781. He fought many battles and made several treaties with the Indians; but in 1794 he was accused of a design to establish an independent government among the Creeks, where he had settled in violation of law. He died in Wilkes county, Ga., Dec. 15, 1799.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cobbett, William 1762-1835 (search)
Cobbett, William 1762-1835 Journalist; born in Farnham, Surrey, England, March 9, 1762; was the self-educated son of a farmer, and in early manhood was eight years in the army, rising to the rank of sergeant-major. He obtained his discharge in 1791, married, and came to America in 1792, when he became a pamphleteer, bookseller, and journalist, having established Peter Porcupine's gazette in 1794. He attacked Dr. Rush, of Philadelphia, because of his treatment of yellow-fever cases, especially of his blood-letting. Rush prosecuted him for libel, and obtained a verdict for $5,000 damages. That suit had been brought to a trial on the day of Washington's death (Dec. 14, 1799), and Cobbett remarked that it was a singular coincidence that while the great patriot was dying in consequence of the too free use of the lancet, he should be mulcted in a verdict of $5,000 for exposing and ridiculing the dangerous practice in yellow fever. In anticipation of the verdict, Cobbett stopped the
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