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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 7 7 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 6 6 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. 4 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 4 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 3 3 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1795 AD or search for 1795 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Belknap, Jeremy, 1744- (search)
Belknap, Jeremy, 1744- Clergyman; born in Boston, June 4, 1744; was graduated at Harvard College in 1762; studied theology; taught school four years; was pastor of a church in Dover. N. H., from 1767 to 1786, and of the Federal Street Church, in Boston, from April 4, 1787, until his death. June 20, 1798. He founded the Massachusetts Historical Society; was an overseer of Harvard College; was a patriot during the war for independence, an opponent of African slavery, and a promoter of literature and science. He published a History of New Hampshire, 3 volumes (1784-92); a collection of Psalms and hymns (1795); The Foresters, a work of wit and humor (1792); American biography, 2 volumes (1794-98), besides sermons and other religious-writings.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bennett, James Gordon, 1795-1872 (search)
Bennett, James Gordon, 1795-1872 Founder of the New York Herald; born in New Mill, Scotland, Sept. 1, 1795; died in New York. June 1, 1872. Intending to enter upon the ministry in the Roman Catholic Church, he studied theology in Aberdeen some time, but, abandoning the intention, he went to British America, arriving at Halifax. N. S., in 1819, where he taught school. He made his way to Boston, where he became a proof-reader, and in 1822 he went to New York, and thence to Charleston, where he made translations from the Spanish for the Charleston Courier. Returning to New York he became proprietor (1825) of the New York Courier, but did not succeed. After various editorial and journalistic adventures in New York and Pennsylvania. Mr. Bennett. in May, 1835. began the pubication of the New York Herald. His method was a new departure in journalism. The Herald obtained an immense circulation and advertising patronage. The profits of the establishment, at the time James Gor
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bonneville, Benjamin L. E., 1795-1878 (search)
Bonneville, Benjamin L. E., 1795-1878 Explorer; born in France about 1795; was graduated at West Point in 1815; engaged in explorations in the Rocky Mountains in 1831-36. Washington Irving edited his journal entitled Adventures of Captain Bonneville, U. S. A., in the Rocky Mountains and the far West. He served throughout the Mexican War, and was wounded at the battle of Churubusco. In 1865 he was brevetted brigadier-general for long and faithful service. He died at Fort Smith, Ark., June, Benjamin L. E., 1795-1878 Explorer; born in France about 1795; was graduated at West Point in 1815; engaged in explorations in the Rocky Mountains in 1831-36. Washington Irving edited his journal entitled Adventures of Captain Bonneville, U. S. A., in the Rocky Mountains and the far West. He served throughout the Mexican War, and was wounded at the battle of Churubusco. In 1865 he was brevetted brigadier-general for long and faithful service. He died at Fort Smith, Ark., June 12, 1878.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boone, Daniel, 1735-1820 (search)
m, and taken to Chillicothe, beyond the Ohio, and thence to Detroit. Adopted as a son in an Indian family, he became a favorite, but managed to escape in June following, and returned to his fort and kindred. In August, about 450 Indians attacked his fort, which he bravely defended with about fifty men. At different times two of his sons were killed by the Indians. Boone accompanied General Clarke on his expedition against the Indians on the Scioto, in Ohio, in 1782, soon after a battle at the Blue Licks. Having lost his lands in Kentucky in consequence of a defective title, he went to the Missouri country in 1795, and settled on the Osage Woman River, where he continued the occupations of hunter and trapper. Again he was deprived of a large tract of land in Missouri, obtained under the Spanish authority, by the title being declared invalid. He died in Charette, Boone's Fort. Mo., Sept. 26, 1820. Boone's remains, with those of his wife, rest in the cemetery near Frankfort, Ky.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Breckenridge, John, 1760-1806 (search)
Breckenridge, John, 1760-1806 Statesman; born in Augusta county. Va., Dec. 2, 1760; was admitted to the bar in 1785; elected to Congress in 1793 but did not accept, having determined to remove to Kentucky, where he settled near Lexington. He was appointed attorney-general of Kentucky in 1795. In 1798 he met Jefferson and Nicholas at Monticello and prepared the famous Kentucky resolutions of 1798, of which Jefferson claimed the authorship. In 1801 he was elected to the United States Senate, and resigned in 1805 to become Attorney-General under President Jefferson, which office he filled about four months. He died in Lexington, Ky., Dec. 14, 1806.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Butler, Zebulon, -1795 (search)
Butler, Zebulon, -1795 Military officer; born in Lyme, Conn., in 1731; served in the French and Indian War and in the expedition to Havana in 1762, when he became a captain. He settled in the Wyoming Valley, Pa., in 1769, and was there when the valley was invaded bv Tories and Indians under Col. John Butler, in 1778. In defence of the inhabitants, he commanded the feeble force there, but was unable to prevent the massacre that took place. The next year he accompanied Sullivan in his expedition into the Indian country in central New York, and served during the remainder of the war. He died in Wilkesbarre, Pa., July 28, 1795.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Callender, James Thompson 1792-1813 (search)
Callender, James Thompson 1792-1813 Editor and author; born in Scotland. He published in Edinburgh, in 1792, a book called Political progress of Great Britain, which so offended the authorities that he was banished from the kingdom, and went to Philadelphia, where he published the Political register in 1794-95, and the American annual register for 1796-97. He was a violent and unscrupulous opponent of Washington's administration, and delighted in abusing Hamilton and other Federalist leaders. For a season he enjoyed the friendship of Jefferson. The latter became disgusted with Callender, when the former, becoming Jefferson's enemy, calumniated him fearfully. He published the Richmond Recorder, in which he made fierce attacks upon the character of Washington and Adams. He died in Richmond, Va., in July, 1813.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carmichael, William 1776-1795 (search)
Carmichael, William 1776-1795 Diplomatist; born in Maryland, date uncertain; was a man of fortune. He was in Europe in 1776, and assisted Silas Deane in his political and commercial operations in France. He also assisted the American commissioners in Paris. In 1778-80 he was in Congress, and was secretary of legation to Jay's mission to Spain. When the latter left Europe (1782) Carmichael remained as charge d'affaires, and retained the office for several years. In 1792 he was associated with William Short on a commission to negotiate with Spain a treaty concerning the navigation of the Mississippi. Sparks's Diplomatic correspondence contains many of his letters. He died in February, 1795.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chickasaw Indians, (search)
and after a while their pole, in the interior of Alabama, remained upright, and there they settled. De Soto passed a winter among them (1540-41), when they numbered 10,000 warriors. These were reduced to 450 when the French seated themselves in Louisiana. Wars with the new-comers and surrounding tribes occurred until the middle of the eighteenth century. They favored the English in the Revolution, when they had about 1,000 warriors. They joined the white people against the Creeks in 1795, and always remained the friends of the pale faces; and, in 1818, they had ceded all their lands north of the State of Mississippi. Some of the tribe had already emigrated to Arkansas. In 1834 they ceded all their lands to the United States, amounting to over 6,400,000 acres, for which they received $3,646,000. Then they joined the Choctaws, who spoke the same language, and became a part of that nation. During their emigration the small-pox destroyed a large number of their tribe. They
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chippewa Indians, (search)
The French established missionaries among them, and the Chippewas were the firm friends of these Europeans until the conquest of Canada ended French dominion in America. In 1712 they aided the French in repelling an attack of the Foxes on Detroit. In Pontiac's conspiracy (see Pontiac) they were his confederates; and they sided with the British in the war of the Revolution and of 1812. Joining the Miamis, they fought Wayne and were defeated, and subscribed to the treaty at Greenville in 1795. In 1816 they took part in the pacification of the Northwestern tribes, and in 1817 they gave up all their lands in Ohio. At that time they occupied a vast and undefined territory from Mackinaw along the line of Lake Superior to the Mississippi River. The limits of this territory were defined by a treaty in 1825, lands to the United States for equivalent annuities. All but a few bands had gone west of the Mississippi in 1851; and in 1866 the scattered bands in Canada, Michigan, on the b
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