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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 9 9 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 9 9 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 9 9 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 9 9 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 8 8 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 8 8 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 8 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 7 7 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The booke made by the right worshipful M. Robert Thorne in the yeere 1527. in Sivil, to Doctour Ley, Lord ambassadour for king Henry the eight, to Charles the Emperour, being an information of the parts of the world, discovered by him and the king of Portingal: and also of the way to the Moluccaes by the North. (search)
nne over the line Equinoctiall Southwarde to the Cape of the maine land of the Indians, called the Cape of Saint Augustine, and from this Cape Southwards to the straites of Todos Santos, in the which navigation to the said straites is 1700. or 1800 leagues; and from these Straites being past them, they returne towarde the line Equinoctiall to the Islands of Spicerie, which are distant from the saide Straites 4200. or 4300. leagues. The navigation of the Portingals to the said Islandes is departing from Portingall Southward towarde the Cape Verde, and from thence to another Cape passing the line Equinoctial called Capo de bona speransa, and from Portingal to the Cape is 1800 leagues, and from this Cape to the Islands of Spicerie of the Emperour is 2500. leagues. So that this navigation amounteth all to 4300. leagues. So that (as afore is sayd,) if between our New found lands or Norway , or Island, the seas toward the North be navigable, we should goe to these Islands a short
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine briefe advises given by Master Dee, to Arthur Pet, and Charles Jackman, to bee observed in their Northeasterne discoverie, Anno 1580. (search)
ees difference onely of longitude very neere East and West, and about the latitude of 70. degrees and two thirde parts: From Colgoieve to Vaigats 200. miles for 10. degrees difference onely in longitude, at 70. degrees of latitude also: From Vaigats to the promontorie Tabin 60. degrees difference of longitude (the whole course, or shortest distance being East and West) in the latitude likewise of 70. degrees, maketh 1200. miles: then is summa totalis from Wardhouse to Tabin 600. leagues, or 1800. English miles. Therefore allowing in a discovery voiage for one day with another but 50. English miles, it is evident that from Wardhouse to Tabin, the course may bee sailed easily in sixe and thirtie dayes: but by Gods helpe it may be finished in much shorter time, both by helpe of winde prosperous, and light continuall for the time requisit thereunto. When you are past Tabin, or come to the longitude of 142. degrees, as your chart sheweth, or two, three, foure, or five degrees furthe
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
de Mendoca viceroy of these realmes: who hath chosen me to be chiefe ensigne-bearer of an army which departed from hence to scoure the coast. For here we have newes of the enemy, which is comming upon the coast: for wee have stayed for their comming these foure moneths the same way which they must come, in a haven called Arica , which is the first entry of Peru . So I have 90 pezos a moneth, besides other profits, at nine reals the pezo; & foure shares at nine reals the pezo. So that I have 1800 pezos every yere of pay: for the viceroy is my dere friend, and maketh great account of me. And I have alwayes 400 ducats in my chest to goe like a man. I beseech God send us quietnesse. But yet it is the part of a gentleman to serve the king his master in these actions. And thus I rest. From the harbour of Arica the tenth of March 1590.I kisse your worships hands, and am at your commandement Don John de Miramontes Suasola. There are foure great galeons of 350 tunnes a piece, w
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine Spanish Letters intercepted by shippes of the worshipfull Master John Wattes written from diverse places of the islandes and of the maine land as well of Nueva Espanna, as of Tierra Firma and Peru , containing many secrets touching the aforesaid countreys, and the state of the South Sea, and the trade to the Philippinas. (search)
de Mendoca viceroy of these realmes: who hath chosen me to be chiefe ensigne-bearer of an army which departed from hence to scoure the coast. For here we have newes of the enemy, which is comming upon the coast: for wee have stayed for their comming these foure moneths the same way which they must come, in a haven called Arica , which is the first entry of Peru . So I have 90 pezos a moneth, besides other profits, at nine reals the pezo; & foure shares at nine reals the pezo. So that I have 1800 pezos every yere of pay: for the viceroy is my dere friend, and maketh great account of me. And I have alwayes 400 ducats in my chest to goe like a man. I beseech God send us quietnesse. But yet it is the part of a gentleman to serve the king his master in these actions. And thus I rest. From the harbour of Arica the tenth of March 1590.I kisse your worships hands, and am at your commandement Don John de Miramontes Suasola. There are foure great galeons of 350 tunnes a piece, w
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of Don John de Miramontes Suasola to Don John Garcias de Penalosa from Arica on the coast of Peru the tenth of March 1590. (search)
de Mendoca viceroy of these realmes: who hath chosen me to be chiefe ensigne-bearer of an army which departed from hence to scoure the coast. For here we have newes of the enemy, which is comming upon the coast: for wee have stayed for their comming these foure moneths the same way which they must come, in a haven called Arica , which is the first entry of Peru . So I have 90 pezos a moneth, besides other profits, at nine reals the pezo; & foure shares at nine reals the pezo. So that I have 1800 pezos every yere of pay: for the viceroy is my dere friend, and maketh great account of me. And I have alwayes 400 ducats in my chest to goe like a man. I beseech God send us quietnesse. But yet it is the part of a gentleman to serve the king his master in these actions. And thus I rest. From the harbour of Arica the tenth of March 1590.I kisse your worships hands, and am at your commandement Don John de Miramontes Suasola. There are foure great galeons of 350 tunnes a piece, w
nd by North, and the distance betweene them is 220 leagues. Item, From the West end of Java minor unto the East end of Java major, the course is West and by North, and East & by South, and the distance betweene them is 18 leagues: in the which course there lieth one iland betweene them, which iland is in length 14 leagues. Item, From the East end of Java major unto the cape of Buena Esperanza, the course is West and by South, and Westsouthwest, and the distance betweene them is 1800 leagues. Item, That Cape Falso standeth 30 leagues to the Eastward of Cape de Buena Esperanza, & off the sayd Cape Falso you shal have shoalding 20 leagues off in 80 or 90 fadoms, & the course is from Cape Falso unto the cape of Buena Esperanza Westnorthwest and Eastsoutheast. A note of the distance and course from the cape of Buena Esperanza unto the Northwards.ITEM, From the cape of Buena Esperanza unto the iland of Santa Helena, the course is Northwest, and Northwest and by West, and
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine rare and special notes most properly belonging to the voyage of M. Thomas Candish next before described; concerning the heights, soundings, lyings of lands, distances of places, the variation of the Compasse, the just length of time spent in sayling betweene divers places, and their abode in them, as also the places of their harbour and anckering, and the depths of the same, with the observation of the windes on severall coastes: Written by M. Thomas Fuller of Ipswich, who was Master in the desire of M. Thomas Candish in his foresaid prosperous voyage about the world. (search)
nd by North, and the distance betweene them is 220 leagues. Item, From the West end of Java minor unto the East end of Java major, the course is West and by North, and East & by South, and the distance betweene them is 18 leagues: in the which course there lieth one iland betweene them, which iland is in length 14 leagues. Item, From the East end of Java major unto the cape of Buena Esperanza, the course is West and by South, and Westsouthwest, and the distance betweene them is 1800 leagues. Item, That Cape Falso standeth 30 leagues to the Eastward of Cape de Buena Esperanza, & off the sayd Cape Falso you shal have shoalding 20 leagues off in 80 or 90 fadoms, & the course is from Cape Falso unto the cape of Buena Esperanza Westnorthwest and Eastsoutheast. A note of the distance and course from the cape of Buena Esperanza unto the Northwards.ITEM, From the cape of Buena Esperanza unto the iland of Santa Helena, the course is Northwest, and Northwest and by West, and
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A note of our course kept from the iland Sebojon unto the Southwards. (search)
and the distance is 100 leagues, and betweene them setteth a great current unto the Eastward. Item, From the cape of Batochina unto the West head of Java minor, the course is Southwest and by South, Northeast and by North, and the distance betweene them is 220 leagues. Item, From the West end of Java minor unto the East end of Java major, the course is West and by North, and East & by South, and the distance betweene them is 18 leagues: in the which course there lieth one iland betweene them, which iland is in length 14 leagues. Item, From the East end of Java major unto the cape of Buena Esperanza, the course is West and by South, and Westsouthwest, and the distance betweene them is 1800 leagues. Item, That Cape Falso standeth 30 leagues to the Eastward of Cape de Buena Esperanza, & off the sayd Cape Falso you shal have shoalding 20 leagues off in 80 or 90 fadoms, & the course is from Cape Falso unto the cape of Buena Esperanza Westnorthwest and Eastsoutheast.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, CASTOR, AEDES, TEMPLUM (search)
the imperial temple previous to 1899, see Richter, Jahrb. d. Inst. 1898, 87-114; also Reber, 136-142; D'Esp. Fr. i. 87-91; ii. 87; for the results of the excavations since 1899, CR 1899, 466; 1902, 95, 284; BC 1899, 253; 1900, 66, 285; 1902, 28; 1903, 165; Mitt. 1902, 66-67; 1905, 80; for general discussion of the temple, Jord. i. 2. 369-376; LR 271-274; HC 161-164; Thed. 116-120, 210- 212; DE i. 175-176; WR 268-271; DR 160-170; RE Suppl. iv. 469- 471; Mem. Am. Acad. v. 79-102 The conclusions of this article are based on inaccurate drawings. ; ASA 70; HFP 37, 38). This temple was standing in the fourth century, but nothing is known of its subsequent history, except that in the fifteenth century only three columns were visible, for the street running by them was called via Trium Columnarum (Jord. ii. 412, 501; LS i. 72, and for other reff. ii. 69, 199, 202; DuP 97). In the early nineteenth century it was often wrongly called the Graecostasis or the temple of Jupiter Stator.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, AUREA, DOMUS (search)
y have therefore come down to us in a very fair state of preservation, especially as regards the paintings, though those of the west wing, which has been more completely opened up, have perished since their discovery in 1811 ; whereas those of the east wing, though known far earlier, have been far less exposed to the air. The ruins indeed have been known since the early Renaissance, and were visited by many of the artists of the time, and by their successors right onwards till the early nineteenth century. Many of their signatures are actually preserved, including that of Giovanni da Udine, the assistant of Raphael in the Loggia of the Vatican and elsewhere (Jahrb. d. Inst. 1913, 140-158). The paintings are all of them on a small scale (III. 21), with little figures painted or in stucco relief, often with stucco framing, and they must always have been difficult to see in the lofty rooms of the Golden House, to which, though well enough suited for ' columbaria,' this style of decorati
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